Policies

Acceptance and Refusal of Authorisations Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.1

Children are adequately supervised at all times

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children for harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations


Regs

92

Medication record

93

Administration of medication

99

Children leaving the education and care service

102

Authorisation for excursions

160

Child enrolment records to be kept by approved provider

161

Authorisations to be kept in enrolment record

168

Education and care services must have policies and procedures

Aim

Our service aims to provide clear and transparent policies and procedures for authorisations. This helps staff and parents understand exactly what they need to do.

Related Policies

Administration of Medication Policy
Enrolment Policy
Excursion Policy
Photography Policy
Physical Safety (Workplace, Learning and Administration) Policy

Implementation

  • Where activities require authorisation, either to comply with national regulations, or to comply with our service policies, our service requires that the authorisation is provided in writing and is dated. These activities include:
    • Administration of medication
    • Administration of medical treatment, dental treatment, general first aid products and ambulance transportation.
    • Excursions including regular outings.
    • Incursions.
    • Taking of photographs by people who aren’t educators
    • Water based activities
    • Enrolment of children including naming of authorised nominees and persons authorised to consent to medical treatment or trips outside the service premises
  • The format of written authorisations required under the national law must comply with the regulations. Please see specific policies for more information.
  • Our service does not accept verbal authorisations in any circumstances except in situations requiring:
    • Emergency administration of medication, including emergencies involving anaphylaxis or asthma

Source

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 2/1/2014 Date for next review: 2/1/2015

Additional Needs Policy

NQS


QA3

3.1.3

Facilities are designed or adapted to ensure access and participation by every child in the service and to allow flexible use, and interaction between indoor and outdoor space.

QA5

5.1.2

Every child is able to engage with educators in meaningful, open interactions that support the acquisition of skills for life and learning.

5.1.3

Each child is supported to feel secure, confident and included.

QA6

6.3.2

Continuity of learning and transitions for each child are supported by sharing relevant information and clarifying responsibilities.

6.3.3

Access to inclusion and support assistance is facilitated.

National Regulations


Regs

155

Interactions with children

156

Relationships in groups

157

Access for parents

EYLF


LO1

Children feel safe, secure, and supported

Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self identities

Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect

Aim

To provide each child regardless of their additional needs and abilities with a supportive and inclusive environment that allows each child to fully participate in their education and care at the service. Educators will remain positive, open-minded and honest at all times when working with families and external support professionals to most positively meet the additional needs of each child being educated and cared for at the service.

Related Policies

Child Protection Policy
Continuity of Education and Care Policy
Enrolment Policy
Orientation for Children Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
HIV AIDS Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy

Implementation

As per the National Quality Standard, our service positively responds to and welcomes children with additional needs who -

  • are Aboriginals or Torres Strait Islanders
  • are recent arrivals in Australia
  • have a culturally and linguistically diverse background
  • live in isolated geographic locations
  • are experiencing difficult family circumstances or stress
  • are at risk of abuse or neglect
  • are experiencing language and communication difficulties
  • have a diagnosed disability—physical, sensory, intellectual or autism spectrum disorder
  • have a medical or health condition
  • demonstrate challenging behaviours and behavioural or psychological disorders
  • have developmental delays
  • have learning difficulties
  • are gifted or have special talents
  • have other extra support needs.

We understand that additional needs arise from different causes, and that causes require different responses any child may have additional needs from time to time.
We recognise that additional needs may be temporary or for a lifetime.

Learning Environments

  • The service environment and equipment will be designed or adapted to ensure access and participation by every child in the service to support the inclusion of children with additional needs.
  • The indoor and the outdoor environment will be suitable for children with additional needs.
  • The service will ensure the program and curriculum meets the needs of children with additional needs. Learning materials and equipment such as books and games will reflect positive inclusion and children with additional needs in the community.
  • The service will work with external professionals and families to ensure that learning environments are most suited to each child with additional needs and children and families from culturally diverse backgrounds. We will also involve children in this process. And where appropriate, the service will keep a copy of any specific plans or instructions provided by external resource providers and professionals for children with additional needs.
  • Children may have sensory sensitivities to pressure, texture, smell , noise, visual expectation of the environment or colour which may need to be considered in the environment.
  • Children will be encouraged to feel safe and secure during their education and care at the service by developing trusting relationships with educators, other children and the community.

Positively Promoting Each Child’s Personal Ability

Our service wants children to develop to the best of their personal ability. Our philosophy highlights our commitment to equity and fairness for all children. Every child in our service is an individual and we aim to promote and encourage this by:

  • Our commitment to ensuring each child is able to fully participate in their education and care at the service.
  • Helping children to develop ease with and have a respect for physical, racial, religious and cultural differences.
  • Enabling children to develop autonomy, independence, competency, confidence and pride.
  • To provide all children with accurate and appropriate material that provides information about the additional needs of others.
  • Providing educators of a high calibre who encourage children to experience active any energetic play in order to develop their physical potential.
  • Presenting children with a wide range of male and female work roles, both within the home and the workplace, including nurturing roles.
  • Encouraging children to develop friendships with each other based on mutual trust and respect.
  • Including in our program and curriculum, and the physical environment, an awareness of cross-cultural and non-discriminatory practices.
  • Using a program that is based on a child’s development and that is also relevant to the children’s life experiences, interests and social skills.
  • Encouraging parents from non-English speaking backgrounds to contribute their knowledge and culture to the service to enhance the program.
  • Making it clear to children through all educators that it is not acceptable for a child to say or do unfair thing to another person and that if this does occur a staff member will firmly step in.
  • Educators will familiarise themselves with, and share knowledge about, the specific communication needs of each child. This will include verbal and non-verbal communication skills and cues. Where applicable, this may include things such as sign language and or learning key words in the child’s home language.

Professional Support Services for Children

  • Our service will not hesitate to access external professional support services for children with additional needs.
  • Educators will liaise with the Nominated Supervisor to ensure the needs of each child are met throughout their education and care at the service.
  • The service will use the Enrolment Form to gather information about children with additional needs. Educators will encourage families to update this information throughout the year and families are responsible for passing on information from any professional support services accessed outside of the service. This will promote the continuity of learning for each child.
  • Information gathered about children with additional needs may be used to develop an individual support plan that will kept on file at the service and shared with families, the child’s medical practitioners and/or professional support services and where appropriate the child’s local school if known by the family.
  • The service will work with local schools to help children with additional needs transition. We are open to sharing information about the additional needs of children to promote continuity of learning.
  • Educators will remain positive, open-minded and honest at all times.
  • The Inclusion Support Agency (ISA) is funded by the Australian Government. The service can lodge an application for Special Needs Subsidy Support (SNSS) funding for additional support workers through the ISA. Funding will be granted when the child meets specific criteria. SNSS workers will help the service with the integration of children with additional needs and will assist staff in putting together an individual program for each child. Australian government funding is necessary in continuing the availability of support through ISA’s and SNSS Workers. Information is available from DEEWR at the following website –

Professional Development for Educators

  • Our service will access professional development for educators to help the service meet the needs of each child with additional needs.

Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed:2.1.2014 Date for next review: 2/1/2015

Administration of Authorised Medication Policy

NQS


QA2

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations


Reg

90

Medical conditions policy

91

Medical conditions policy to be provided to parents

92

Medication record

93

Administration of medication

94

Exception to authorisation requirement - anaphylaxis or asthma emergency

95

Procedure for administration of medication

96

Self-administration of medication

EYLF


LO3

Children are happy, healthy, safe and connected to others.

Educators promote continuity of children’s personal health and hygiene by sharing ownership of routines and schedules with children, families and the community

Educators discuss health and safety issues with children and involve them in developing guidelines to keep the environment safe for all

Aim


The service and all educators can safely administer any medication as necessary to children with the written authority of the child’s parents. It is important to follow strict procedures to promote the health and wellbeing of each child using the service.

Related Policies

Emergency Service Contact Policy
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
HIV AIDS Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Medical Conditions Policy

Implementation

  • The service will ensure each that the Administration of Authorised Medication Record is completed for each child using the service who requires medication. A separate form must be completed for each medication if more than one is required.
  • Medication may only be administered by the service with written authority signed by the child’s parent or other responsible individual named in the child’s enrolment record that is authorised by the child’s parents to make decisions about the administration of medication.
  • In the instance that the child’s registered medical practitioner prescribes a medication, the service must ensure the medication is administered appropriately.
  • Medication must be provided by the child’s parents including the following -
    • Original container. Medication will only be administered from the original container.
    • Original label that is clearly readable.
    • Child’s name clearly on the label.
    • Any instructions attached to the medication or related to the use of the medication.
    • Any verbal or written instructions provided by the child’s registered medical practitioner.
  • Any individual delivering a child to the service must not leave medications in the child’s bag or locker. Medication must be given directly to an educator for appropriate storage upon arrival.

Emergency Administration of Medication

  • For anaphylaxis or asthma emergencies, please see below.
  • In the event of an emergency, the service must follow the Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy and complete the Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Record.
  • In the event of an emergency and where the administration of medication must occur, the service must attempt to receive verbal authorisation by a parent of the child named in the child’s Enrolment Form who is authorised to consent to the administration of medication.
  • If a parent of a child cannot be contacted, , the service must attempt to receive verbal authorisation from an emergency contact of the child named in the child’s Enrolment Form who is authorised to consent to the administration of medication.
  • If none of the child’s nominated contacts can be reasonably reached, the service must contact a registered medical practitioner or an emergency service on 000.
  • In the event of an emergency and where the administration of medication must occur, written notice must be provided to a parent of the child or other emergency contact individual listed on the child’s Enrolment Form.

Emergency Involving Anaphylaxis or Asthma

  • For anaphylaxis or asthma emergencies, medication may be administered to a child without an authorisation following the information listed above under Emergency Administration of Medication.
  • The service must contact the following as soon as practicably possible -
    • A parent of the child.
    • Emergency services.
    • The child will be positively reassured, calmed and removed to a quiet area under the direct supervision of a suitably experienced and trained staff member.

Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 7/1/2014 Date for next review: 7/1/2015

Animal and Pet Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

QA3

3.1.1

Outdoor and indoor spaces, buildings, furniture, equipment, facilities and resources are suitable for their purpose.

3.3

The service takes an active role in caring for its environment and contributes to a sustainable future.

3.3.2

Children are supported to become environmentally responsible and show respect for the environment.

National Regulations


Regs

168

Policies and procedures are required in relation to health and safety

EYLF


LO2

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

Aim

Our service aims to provide a safe and hygienic environment that minimises the risk of a child being harmed by an animal. We also aim to educate children in the proper care of animals.

Implementation

  • Children must be closely supervised when accessing any animal or pet at the service.
  • Any animal or pet kept at the Service will be regularly fed, cleaned, vaccinated, have flea powder applied to them and be regularly checked for fleas and wormed. Any animal in a cage will have its cage cleaned daily.
  • Animal or pets will not be allowed in the sandpit or any other play area. In event that this happens, educators will refer to the Sand Pit Policy.
  • Animal or pets will never be taken into the food preparation area nor will they be allowed near the eating or sleeping area.
  • Anyone who has handled the animal or pet will immediately wash their hands after they have finished handling the animal or pet.
  • Children’s animal or pets will only be allowed in the Service when permission has been granted by the Nominated Supervisor. If an animal is brought to the Service when families are collecting children it must be left at the gate far enough way so children cannot touch the animal through the fence.
  • It will be included in the program how to properly care for animals and how to treat them appropriately.

 Source

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 14/1/2014 Date for next review: 14/1/2015

Bush Fire Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

QA6

6.3.1

Links with relevant community and support agencies are established and maintained.

6.3.4

The service builds relationships and engages with their local community.

National Regulations


Reg

168(2)(e)

Policies and procedures in relation to emergency and evacuation

97

Emergency and evacuation procedures

98

Telephone or other communication equipment

EYLF


LO2

 

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

LO4

Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials

Aim

Our service aims to keep all children and educators safe at all times. Therefore, in the instance of a bush fire, the service will act at all times to protect the educators and children in line with recommendations and instructions from relevant emergency authorities.

Who is affected by this policy?

Children
Families
Educators
Community
Visitors

Implementation

As per the Royal Bushfire Commission Report, the service will prepare a Bushfire Action Plan should a bushfire effect the service’s operations.

The aim of this Bushfire Action Plan is to outline the activities that educators, children, families and visitors to be undertaken in the following circumstances:

  • On days of Total Fire Ban
  • When there is a fire in the local district.
  • When a bushfire is threatening or impacting the site.
  • During a period of recovery if a bushfire impacts the service.

During peak bush fire seasons, such as Spring and Summer, educators will monitor the Fire Danger Rating daily. Should the Rating be above High, educators will monitor the situation in line with the process in our region, such as via the internet or radio, to keep aware of the situation.

Trees will be trimmed to a distance of 2m from the buildings. Educators will inspect the ground at the beginning of Spring and the owner/Nominated Supervisor will arrange for any lopping of branches if necessary. In line with this, gutters and roofs will regularly be clean and kept free of leaves. Also, time and paintwork on buildings will be kept well maintained. Please see Maintenance of Building and Equipment Policy for further details.

A Safe Refuge Kit will be organised and stored somewhere that is easily accessible. This kit will include:

  • A copy of the Bushfire Action Plan
  • Emergency Contact Details for each child.
  • Child attendance registers.
  • Emergency telephone numbers.
  • Working torch and spare batteries
  • First Aid Kit.
  • Educators/Children Medications and Medical Register
  • Mobile Phone and Charger
  • Drinking Water
  • Nappies
  • Blankets
  • Towels
  • Change Mat
  • Gloves
  • Nappy Wipes

This Kit will be checked at the start of Spring for contents.

Very High, Severe or Extreme Fire Danger Ratings

On days where the Fire Danger Rating is Very High, Severe of Extreme, the service will inform families by posting a warning in the entrance/noticeboard.

Children will be transitioned throughout the day as per our usual practice.

Any educators who are planned to attend off-site training will stay at the service, and have their training cancelled/rescheduled.

The OHS Officer or Fire Warden will ensure that all gates have access keys and ensure the locks are in working order.

All educators will monitor conditions when on duty outside. Educators will also ensure that no art and craft works, posters etc are hung outside and that garbage bins are emptied throughout the day.

Family members will be required to provide a reliable contact number for the day and families are required to provide the service with their child’s asthma medication for the day.

The Nominated Supervisor/nominated educators will ensure that all outdoor taps are in working order with hoses attached and buckets placed beside each exterior tap.

The Nominated Supervisor/nominated educators will ensure that the outdoor industrial dumpster is closed at all times.

One nominated educators will ensure the mobile phone in the Kit is in full working order with a fully charged battery, and that the charger is put in the Kit. This kit will then be moved to the Educators Room for easy access. The Emergency Contact register and Daily Roll will be added to the Kit. The medical register for the day will also be added to the kit.

The Fire Warden will ensure all hazards are removed from passages and walkways and nothing is blocking emergency exits.

Fire Reported in Local Area

The Nominated Supervisor will inform families and educators via a notice posted on the front door/foyer/noticeboard.

All nominated educators will be called together to discuss the situation and perform their duties.

The children will continue to be transitioned through their day with our usual transition method.

Any educators who are planned to attend off-site training will stay at the service, and have their training cancelled/rescheduled.

The OHS Officer or Fire Warden will ensure that all gates have access keys and ensure the locks are in working order.

All children’s activities outside the building will be cancelled.

Educators, families and visitors to the service will be encouraged to reverse park their cars.

Families will be required to provide a reliable contact number for the day and provide asthma medication if their child suffers from asthma.

The Nominated Supervisor/nominated educators will ensure that all outdoor taps are in working order with hoses attached and buckets placed beside each exterior tap.

The Nominated Supervisor/nominated educators will ensure that the outdoor industrial dumpster is closed at all times.

One nominated educators will ensure the mobile phone in the Kit is in full working order with a fully charged battery, and that the charger is put in the Kit. This kit will then be moved to the Educators Room for easy access. The Emergency Contact register and Daily Roll will be added to the Kit. The medical register for the day will also be added to the kit.

The Fire Warden will ensure all hazards are removed from passages and walkways and nothing is blocking emergency exits.

Nominated educators will back up all computer files.

The Fire Warden will ensure that whistles are in place beside each portable fire extinguisher. These are to be used to notify everyone if a fire starts on site.

Educators will be diligent in ensuring children’s personal items are placed in their bags when not in use.

Fire Reported in Immediate Vicinity or Directly Impacting the Service

The procedure above will be followed immediately.

Educators will move all hoses inside building

Educators will close all doors and windows

Educators will access the roof space every 10-20 minutes to check for spot fires.

The Nominated Supervisor will inform the owner/approved provider of the situation and regularly keep them updated of the situation.
The Licensee will inform the appropriate service about the situation, advising the Licensing officer of the number of children affected, the educators ratios in place and any issues or injuries that have arise.

Recovery after the Front has passed.

The Nominated Supervisor will ensure that no educators, family member, child or visitor associated with the service leaves the building until the situation as safe by members of the emergency services.

The Emergency Response Team, made up of members of educators, will assess the situation and if necessary make arrangements for the care of children for an extended period of time.

Educators at the service will stay on duty until all children have been collected of relief educators arrive.

Only a qualified educator will administer first aid should the situation arise.

The Nominated Supervisor will at all times work to keep the approved provider abreast of the situation. The approved provider will then advise the Licensing Unit/Officer of the number of children affected, emergency educators ratios in place, any issues that arose and if possible the projected impact to the service.

The Emergency Response Team of nominated educators will continue to check the building and surrounds for 2-4 hours after the front has passed.

Relevant educators will undertake a debrief of the fire emergency situation and the procedures undertaken. Educators will be requested to review their own roles, responsibilities and preparation before and during the crisis. The policy will be reviewed to ascertain it’s effectiveness.

Nominated educators will arrange to have fire fighting equipment, warning system and Emergency Kits checked and readied for use again.

If necessary, the owner/Nominated Supervisor will arrange for relevant authorities to check the safety of the site.

Fees and Charges

Attendance fees for the day will still be charged. Should family member be unable to collect, or arrange collection of their children within one hour of the usual operation hours of the service, fees will apply as per our Arrival and Departure Policy.

CCB payments are available for up to 42 days in this circumstance. For further information on this please read:

http://www.deewr.gov.au/Earlychildhood/Resources/Documents/FactSheets/CCFactSheet.pdf

Sources

National Quality Standard
Education and Care Services National Regulations
The Bushfire Royal Commission Report Vic 2009
Early Years Learning Framework

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties.

Reviewed: 21/1/2014 Date for next review: 21/1/2015

Chemical Spills Policy

Chemical Spills Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised
and implemented.

QA3

3.1.1

Outdoor and indoor spaces, buildings, furniture, equipment, facilities
and resources are suitable for their purpose.

3.3

The service takes an active role in caring for its environment and contributes to a sustainable future.

3.3.2

Children are supported to become environmentally responsible and show respect for the environment.

National Regulations


Regs

85

Incident, injury, trauma and illness policies and procedures

97

Emergency and evacuation procedure

106

Laundry and hygiene facilities

Aim

To ensure that, should a chemical be spilled in the service, that it is cleaned up immediately in a safe manner.

Related Policies

Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy
Emergency Service Contact Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy

Who is affected by this policy?

Child
Parents
Family
Educators
Management
Visitors
Volunteers

PROCEDURE

  • Remove children from the area.
  • Contain the spill. Ensure that it is cleaned up thoroughly and promptly.
  • Approach with care when cleaning. Some chemicals may lack colour or odours, but may still be dangerous. Never assume a chemical is harmless
  • Identify chemicals and potential hazards by using the appropriate Material Safety Data Sheet.
  • Use the manufacturer’s recommendations to clean up the spill appropriately.
  • Decontaminate any equipment or clothing associated with the spill.
  • Dispose of any equipment should the spill have made it unsafe for further use.
  • Reflect on procedures to analyse how this incident occurred and how the incident could be prevented in the future.

 Source

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Occupational Health & Safety Act 2004

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 28/1/2014 Date for next review: 28/1/2015

Child Protection Policy

Child Protection Reporting Overview

Notifications of Abuse

If anyone has suspicions of serious abuse contact Child Protection Service
on 131 278 (24 hours, 7 days)
 


If anyone has suspicions of low to moderate level abuse contact Child FIRST (see next page)
 


When children are in immediate danger of abuse contact the police on000

Consult OUR Child Protection Policy
for more information.


Additional Child Protection Contacts

DHS Regions

Telephone

Eastern

1300 360 391

Southern

1300 655 795

Northern & Western

1300 664 977

South Western Rural and Regional

1800 075 599

Eastern and South Eastern Rural and Regional

1800 020 202

Western Rural and Regional

1800 000 551

North Eastern Rural and Regional

1800 650 227

North Western Rural and Regional

1800 675 598

Child Protection Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.4

Educators, co-ordinators and educators are aware of their roles and responsibilities to respond to every child at risk of abuse or neglect.

National Regulations


Regs

84

Awareness of child protection law

Aim

All educators and staff at our service take seriously their responsibility to protect children from any type of abuse, and are aware of their roles and responsibilities regarding child protection. While we understand there are legislative obligations we must follow, we believe it is also our responsibility as educators to ensure the safety and wellbeing of all children, and to provide the children at our service with the opportunity to develop to their full potential free from any form of harm and abuse. We will implement a child protection risk management strategy to ensure the safety of children is paramount and the service will always act quickly in the best interests of a child.


Related Policies

Educator and Management Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Record Keeping and Retention Policy
Family Law and Access Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Tobacco Drug and Alcohol Policy

Related Documentation

Incident Injury Trauma and Illness Record
Child Protection Annual Review
Educator Induction Processes
Educator Appraisal Processes
Educator Recruitment Processes
Educator Professional Development Processes
Educator Job Descriptions
Staff Records
Risk Management Plans

Implementation

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members and volunteers will implement a Child Protection Risk Management Strategy to ensure the health, wellbeing and safety of all children at the service.

Child Protection Risk Management Strategy

  • Code of Conduct

The service upholds a Code of Conduct in relation to employers, educators, volunteers, students, families and children to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children (See Educator and Management Policy).

  • Recruitment, Selection and Training Procedures include child protection principles.

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor is responsible for developing recruitment and professional development procedures that ensure all people working at the service do not pose a risk to children and understand how to respond to disclosures or suspicions of harm and abuse. (See Appendix A and Educator and Management Policy “Professional Development Requirements).

  • Procedures for Reporting and Documenting Abuse or Neglect
  • Procedures for Managing Breaches
  • Risk Management for High Risk Activity
  • Information for Families

 

3. Procedures for Reporting and Documenting Abuse or Neglect
What is abuse?

Under the Children Youth and Families Act 2005 a child is considered to be in need of protection if:

  • the child has been abandoned by their parent(s) and no other suitable person is willing and able to care for the child.
  • the child's parent(s) are dead or incapacitated and there is no other suitable person willing and able to care for them.
  • the child has suffered, or is likely to suffer, significant harm as a result of physical injury, sexual abuse, emotional or psychological harm and the child's parent(s) have not protected, or are unlikely to protect, the child from that harm.
  • the child's physical development or health has been, or is likely to be significantly harmed and the child's parent(s) have not provided or arranged, or are unlikely to provide or arrange, basic care or effective medical, surgical or other remedial care.

Educators and staff members are not mandated reporters under the legislation but all educators and staff members who believe on reasonable grounds that a child is in need of protection will report abuse and neglect to either Child Protection on 131278 or Child FIRST. Child FIRST contacts are available at http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/for-individuals/children,-families-and-young-people/family-and-parenting-support/family-services/child-first-child-and-family-information,-referral-and-support-teams.

A report to Child Protection will be made if:

  • the harm or risk of harm has a serious impact on the child’s immediate safety, stability or development
  • the harm or risk of harm is persistent and entrenched and is likely to have a serious impact on the child’s immediate safety, stability or development
  • the child’s parents cannot or will not protect the child from harm.

A report to Child FIRST will be made if concerns about the child have a low to moderate impact on the child and the immediate safety of the child is not compromised. Some of these concerns may include:

  • family conflict or family breakdown
  • young or isolated families
  • significant parenting problems that may be affecting the child’s development.

A step by step guide to making a report to Child Protection or Child FIRST is available on the Victorian Department of Human Services website at http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/582591/flowchart-mandatory-reporting-27-5-10.pdf

A person may form a belief on reasonable grounds that a child is in need of protection after
becoming aware that a child’s health, safety or wellbeing is at risk and the child’s
parents are unwilling or unable to protect the child. For example:

  • a child states that they have been physically or sexually abused
  • a child states that they know someone who has been physically or sexually

abused (sometimes the child may be talking about themselves)

  • someone who knows the child says they has been physically or sexually abused
  • a child shows signs of being physically or sexually abused
  • a staff member is aware of persistent family violence or parental substance misuse, psychiatric illness or intellectual disability that is impacting on the child’s safety or development
  • a staff member observes indicators of abuse, including non-accidental or unexplained injury, persistent neglect, poor care or lack of appropriate supervision
  • a child’s actions or behaviour place them at risk of significant harm and the child’s parents are unwilling or unable to protect the child.

 

Responsibilities
The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members and volunteers must:

  • be able to recognise indicators of abuse (see Appendix B).
  • take anything a child says seriously and follow up their concerns.
  • allow children to be part of decision-making processes where appropriate.
  • understand they must report to Child Protection 131278 or Child FIRST(both available 24 hours/7 days a week) if they believe on reasonable grounds a child has, is or is likely to suffer abuse and neglect. Educators, staff members and volunteers should make the report with the assistance or support of the Nominated Supervisor.
  • contact the police on 000 if there is an immediate danger to a child and intervene immediately if it is safe to do so.
  • connect families with referral agencies through Child FIRST. Family consent will be sought before making referrals.
  • promote the welfare, safety and wellbeing of children at the service.
  • prepare accurate records to assist investigations of abuse or suspected abuse by Child Protection or Child FIRST. Accurate records record exactly what happened, was thought to have happened or potentially could happen.
  • understand that allegations of abuse and neglect against them are treated in the same way as allegations of harm against other people (see “Allegations against Service Personnel”).

The Approved Provider and Nominated Supervisor must also:

  • ensure that all employees and volunteers are:
  • clear about their roles and responsibilities regarding child protection.
  • aware of their obligations to immediately report cases where they believe on reasonable grounds a child has or is experiencing abuse and neglect including sexual abuse.
  • aware of the indicators showing a child may be at risk of abuse or neglect.
  • provide training and development for all educators, staff and volunteers in the recognition and reporting of harm.
  • provide reporting procedures and professional standards to safeguard children and protect the integrity of educators, staff and volunteers.
  • inform all stakeholders of the actions or inactions that form a breach of the child protection risk management strategy and the potential outcomes of breaching the strategy.
  • manage any breaches of the child protection risk management strategy.
  • conduct a Working With Children Check (WWCC) for all educators, staff and volunteers unless the person meets the criteria for exemption from a WWCC. Further information is available at http://www.workingwithchildren.vic.gov.au/
  • provide access to relevant acts, regulations, standards and other resources to help educators, staff and volunteers meet their obligations.
  • ensure records of harm or suspected harm are kept in line with our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy.

Allegations against Service Personnel

Allegations of abuse or suspected abuse against educators, staff members, volunteers, the Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider are treated in the same way as allegations against other people. However, under the legislation any allegation of abuse by the Approved Provider, staff member, educator or visitor to an education and care service must immediately be reported directly to Victoria Police on 000.
Educators will make the report with the assistance or support of the Nominated Supervisor. If the Supervisor is involved in the harm then the Approved Provider or most senior educator will assist in notifying Child Protection or Child FIRST.

The Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider:

  • will complete an Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Record and notify the Regulatory Authority within 24 hours of making the report to Child Protection or Child FIRST.
  • will provide appropriate support for any educator or staff member who has an allegation made against them.
  • will protect the identity of educators/staff members against whom unsubstantiated complaints have been made will be protected.
  • will review the person’s duties, and if they continue to interact with children, ensure they are appropriately supervised at all times.
  • may seek legal advice about restricting that person’s work activities.

Documentation
Documenting a suspicion of abuse and neglect

If educators have concerns about the safety of a child they will:

  • record their concerns in a non-judgmental and accurate manner as soon as possible.
  • record their own observations as well as accurate details of any conversation with a parent (who may for example explain a noticeable mark on a child).
    • not attempt to conduct their own investigation.
  • document as soon as possible so the details are accurately captured including:
      • time, date and place of the suspicion
      • full details of the suspected abuse
      • date of report and signature.

Documenting a disclosure of abuse and neglect
A disclosure of harm occurs when someone, including a child, tells you about harm that has happened or is likely to happen. Disclosures of harm may start with:
• ―I think I saw…‖
• ―Somebody told me that…‖
• ―Just think you should know…‖
• ―I‘m not sure what I want you to do, but…‖

When receiving a disclosure of abuse and neglect educators, staff members, the Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider will:

    • remain calm and find a private place to talk
    • not promise to keep a secret
    • tell the child/person they have done the right thing in revealing the information but that they’ll need to tell someone who can help keep the child safe
    • only ask enough questions to confirm the need to report the matter because probing questions could cause distress, confusion and interfere with any later enquiries
    • not attempt to conduct their own investigation or mediate an outcome between the parties involved.
  • document as soon as possible so the details are accurately captured including:
      • time, date and place of the disclosure
      • ‘word for word‘ what happened and what was said, including anything they said and any actions that have been taken
      • date of report and signature.

Notifications of abuse and neglect

The person making a notification of abuse or suspected abuse will make a record of the answers to the following:

  • name of person they spoke to.
  • what the next step in the process is.
  • what advice will be sent to confirm the report has been made.
  • If there is any further action they need to take.

Confidentiality

It is important that any notification remains confidential, as it is vitally important to remember that no confirmation of any allegation can be made until the matter is investigated. The individual who makes the complaint should not inform the person they have made the complaint about. This ensures the matter can be investigated without prior knowledge and contamination of evidence.
Safeguards for reporters

Reports made to Child Protection or Child FIRST are kept confidential. Under the Children Youth and Families Act 2005 if the report is made in good faith:

  • the report will not breach confidence or standards of professional conduct
  • the report can’t incur civil or criminal liability
  • the identity of the person making the report is protected. (However the Court may grant leave to reveal the person’s identity if the evidence is critically important.)

A report is also an exempt document under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

 

4. Procedures for Managing Breaches

This plan outlines the steps to be taken following a breach of the child protection risk management strategy in order to address the breach in a fair and supportive manner.

Definition

All educators and staff working with children have a duty of care to support and protect children. A duty of care is breached if a person:

  • does something that a reasonable person in that person’s position would not do in a particular situation
  • fails to do something that a reasonable person in that person’s position would do in the circumstances
  • acts or fails to act in a way that causes harm to someone the person owes a duty of care.

A breach is also any action or inaction by any member of the service, including children and young people, that fails to comply with any part of the strategy including any breach of:

  • a statement of commitment to the safety of children and their protection from harm
  • a code of conduct for interacting with children
  • procedures for recruiting, selecting, training and managing paid employees and volunteers
  • policies and procedures for handling disclosures or suspicions of harm, including reporting guidelines
  • policies and procedures for implementing and reviewing the child protection risk management strategy
  • risk management plans for high risk activities and special events
  • strategies for communication and support.

Processes to manage a breach of the child protection risk management strategy

The Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider will manage breaches in a fair, unbiased and supportive manner:

  • all people concerned will be advised of the process
  • all people concerned will be able to provide their version of events
  • the details of the breach, including the versions of all parties and the outcome will be recorded
  • matters discussed in relation to the breach will be kept confidential
  • an appropriate outcome will be decided.

 

Suitable outcomes for breaches

Depending on the nature of the breach outcomes may include:

  • emphasising the relevant component of the child protection risk management strategy, for example, the code of conduct
  • providing closer supervision
  • further education and training
  • mediating between those involved in the incident (where appropriate)
  • disciplinary procedures if necessary
  • reviewing current policies and procedures and developing new policies and procedures if necessary.

5. Risk Management Plan for High Risk Activity

In addition to workplace health and safety concerns, a child risk management strategy should analyse the risk of ‘harm’ to children. See Appendix C for a risk Management template.

6. Information for Families

Our Child Protection Risk Management Strategy

Creating safe and supportive service environments for children is everyone‘s business. Our service is committed to ensuring children are kept safe from harm. We will initiate and maintain ongoing planning and commitment to a safe and supportive environment so children:

  • feel safe and protected from harm
  • help plan activities and make decisions
  • are consulted and respected
  • have their best interests considered and upheld.

We have a written child protection risk management strategy to protect the children in our service from harm, and to ensure we have a safe and supportive environment for children by identifying and minimising risks.

The child protection risk management strategy consists of:

  • a code of conduct for interacting with children.
  • procedures for recruiting, selecting, training and managing paid employees and volunteers, including screening procedures through working with children checks.
  • procedures for handling disclosures or suspicions of harm, including reporting guidelines
  • procedures for managing breaches of the strategy
  • risk management plans for high-risk activities and special events
  • strategies for communication and support.

As a parent/carer it is important for you to understand the policies and procedures that form the child protection risk management strategy. A copy of the strategy is attached for your information and comment.

Educating Children about Protective Behaviour
We aim to teach children:

  • about acceptable and unacceptable behaviour, and appropriate and inappropriate contact in a manner suitable to their age and level of understanding
  • that they have a right to feel safe at all times.
  • to say ‘no‘ to anything that makes them feel unsafe
  • the difference between ‘fun’ scared that is appropriate risk taking and dangerous scared that is not ok.
  • to use their own skills to feel safe.
  • to recognise signs that they do not feel safe and need to be alert and think clearly.
  • that there is no secret too awful, no story too terrible, that they can‘t share with someone they trust .
  • that educators are available for them if they have any concerns.
  • to tell educators of any suspicious activities or people.
  • to recognise and express their feelings verbally and non-verbally.
  • that they can choose to change the way they are feeling.

Beliefs

Our service believes that:

  • children are capable of the same range of emotions as adults.
  • children’s emotions are real and need to be accepted by adults.
  • a response given to a child from an adult in a child’s early stages of emotional development can be hugely positive or detrimental depending on the adult’s reaction.
  • children are very in touch with their bodies’ reactions to their emotions.
  • children who retain, enhance and better understand their body’s response to an emotion are more able to foresee the outcome out a situation and avoid them or ask for help.

 

Sources

Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference (2005). Creating safe environments for children: Organisations, employees and volunteers: National framework.
Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference (2005). Schedule: Guidelines for building the capacity of child-safe organisations. Creating safeenvironments for children: Organisations, employees and volunteers: Nationalframework.
Children, Youth and Families Act 2005
The Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005
Depart of Human Services Child Protection, Dept of Education and Early Childhood Development, Licensed Children’s services and Victorian Schools “Protecting the Safety and Wellbeing of Children and Young People”
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Early Years Learning Framework

Review

  • The policy will be reviewed annually and will be conducted by:
  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Reviewed: 13.3.2014 Date for next review: 13.3.2015


Appendix A


Educator Recruitment Procedures

Name: Carol Wright

Date: 13.3.2014

Service Name: Somerville Childcare & Kindergarten

 Recruitment Process

  • The Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor will oversee and approve the recruitment process:
    • ensuring there is a documented position description for the vacant position that is accurate and current.
    • arranging for the position to be advertised
    • ensuring there is a standard list of interview questions for all applicants
    • reviewing the applications that have been received and making a short list of applicants
    • arranging suitable interview times with the shortlisted applicants
    • contacting referees for the most suitable candidate(s). A Telephone reference Check Template is attached.
    • making an offer of employment in writing which the applicant must sign as an acceptance of the offer. The applicant must sign a contract of employment containing the specific terms and conditions of employment. A base Employment Contract is attached.
    • notifying unsuccessful applicants by letter, telephone or email.
  • Recruitment and selection decisions will be made by the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor.

Job Description

Every position must have a position description which:

  • summarises the job and describes the tasks,
  • details the skills, qualifications and experience required to perform the job and whether these are essential or desirable criteria.
  • Clearly describes the expectations for educators/staff members to provide a safe and supportive environment for children.

Advertising

  • Positions may, at the discretion of the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor and where relevant, be initially advertised internally via email. This process gives current employees the chance to be considered for a transfer or nominate a suitable contact as a potential candidate.
  • External advertising will occur when a suitable internal candidate (including employee contact) is unavailable, or may occur concurrently with the internal advertising where the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor believes it is in the service’s best interests to source additional candidates.

The Job Advertisement

The job advertisement will be written in clear, concise and non-discriminatory language and will contain:

  • the title of the position
  • a summary of the role and conditions of employment
  • the essential and desirable criteria for candidates
  • information about what applicants should provide with their applications
  • clear, concise details about our Service and our safe, supportive work practices
  • advice that the successful applicant will need to undergo a successful Working With Children Check
  • the name of a contact person
  • the closing date for receipt of applications
  • a statement that the Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Interviews

The Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor will conduct the interview. The format of the interview will be:

  • advise the applicant about the position and the Service
  • discuss the applicant’s skills and experience as they relate to the position
  • answer any questions the applicant may have
  • advise the applicant about the next steps in the selection process
  • obtain permission to contact the applicant’s nominated referees.

Selection of Candidates and Offer of Employment

Following the interviews, we will check the work histories and references of the most suitable candidates(s) after obtaining their permission. If a decision is made to employ the most suitable candidate, we will make a written offer of employment.
The successful applicant must sign a contract of employment containing the specific terms and conditions of their employment.

Exit Interviews

If an employee resigns, management will undertake an exit interview with the person to:

  • gather information about the effectiveness of the recruitment process.
  • identify possible areas for improvement in organisational processes, management, job design, remuneration or career planning and development.
  • receive positive feedback on what is working well.

Appendix B
Indicators of Harm

There are many indicators of harm to children. Behavioural or physical signs which assist in recognising harm to children are known as indicators. The following is a guide only. One indicator on its own may not imply abuse or neglect. However a single indicator can be as important as the presence of several indicators. Each indicator needs to be considered in the context of other indicators and the child’s circumstances. A child's behaviour is likely to be affected if he/she is under stress. There can be many causes of stress and it is important to find out specifically what is causing the stress. Abuse and neglect can be single incidents or ongoing, and may be intentional or unintentional.


General indicators of abuse and neglect

marked delay between injury and seeking medical assistance

  • history of injury
  • the child gives some indication that the injury did not occur as stated
  • the child tells you someone has hurt him/her
  • the child tells you about someone he/she knows who has been hurt
  • someone (relative, friend, acquaintance, sibling) tells you that the child may have been abused

Physical Abuse

Physical indicators include:

  • Bruises, burns, sprains, dislocations, bites, cuts
  • Fractured bones, especially in an infant where a fracture is unlikely to occur accidentally
  • Poisoning
  • Internal injuries
  • Bald patches where hair has been pulled out

Possible behavioural indicators include:

  • Showing wariness or distrust of adults
  • Wearing long sleeved clothes on hot days (to hide bruising or other injury)
  • Demonstrating fear of parents and of going home
  • Becoming fearful when other children cry or shout
  • Being excessively friendly to strangers
  • Being very passive and compliant
  • Not reacting or showing little emotion when hurt
  • Showing little or no fear when threatened
  • Often being absent
  • Showing regressive behaviour such as bed-wetting
  • Often feeling sad or crying

Sexual Abuse

A child is sexually abused when any person uses their authority or power over the child to engage in sexual activity. This can include exploitation through pornography or voyeurism. Sexual abuse is not usually identified through physical indicators. Often the first sign is when a child tells someone they trust that they have been sexually abused. However the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, or vaginal or anal bleeding or discharge may indicate sexual abuse.

Physical indicators include:

  • Injury to the genital or rectal area
  • Vaginal or anal bleeding or discharge
  • Discomfort in toileting
  • Inflammation and infection of genital area
  • Bruising
  • Frequent urinary tract infections

One or more of these behavioural indicators may be present:

  • Child telling someone that sexual abuse has occurred
  • Complaining of headaches or stomach pains
  • Experiencing problems with schoolwork
  • Displaying sexual behaviour or knowledge which is unusual for the child's age
  • Showing behaviour such as frequent rocking, sucking and biting
  • Experiencing difficulties in sleeping
  • Having difficulties in relating to adults and peers
  • Drawing or telling stories that are sexually explicit
  • Showing regressive behaviour such as bed-wetting

 Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse happens when a child is repeatedly rejected, isolated or frightened by threats or by witnessing family violence. It also includes hostility, derogatory name-calling and putdowns or persistent coldness from a person to the extent the child’s emotional development and behaviour is at serious risk of being impaired. There are few physical indicators, although emotional abuse may cause delays in emotional, mental, or even physical development.

Physical indicators include:

  • Speech disorders
  • Delays in physical development
  • Failure to thrive

Possible behavioural indicators include:

  • Displaying low self esteem
  • Tending to be withdrawn, passive, tearful
  • Displaying aggressive or demanding behaviour
  • Being highly anxious
  • Showing delayed speech
  • Acting like a much younger child, eg. soiling, wetting pants
  • Displaying difficulties in relating to adults and peers
  • Showing mental or emotional displays
  • Having overly high standards and a fear of failure

 Neglect

Physical indicators include:

  • Frequent hunger
  • Malnutrition
  • Poor hygiene
  • Inappropriate clothing, eg. Summer clothes in winter
  • Left unsupervised for long periods
  • Medical needs not attended to
  • Abandoned by parents

Possible behavioural indicators include:

  • stealing food or gorging when food is available
  • staying at school outside school hours
  • often being tired, falling asleep in class
  • abusing alcohol or drugs
  • displaying aggressive behaviour
  • not getting on well with peers
  • poor socialising habits
  • withdrawn, listless, pale and thin

The presence of indicators such as those described may alert us to the possibility that a child is being abused. It is important that anyone who has concerns that a child or young person is in need of protection contacts a local Child Protection Service for assistance and advice.

Family Violence

Family violence, either threatened or actual, occurs within a family, including physical, verbal, emotional, psychological, sexual, financial and social abuse. Child Protection must be informed when there are strong indicators that family violence is placing a child at significant risk if danger.


Appendix C

Child Protection Risk Management Strategy – Template Risk Management Plan for High Risk Activity

In addition to occupational health and safety concerns, a child and youth risk management strategy should analyse the risk of ‘harm’ to children and young people.

 

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

Describe the activity
Identify all elements of the event from beginning to end

Identify Risks
Something that could happen that results in harm to a child or young person

Analyse the Risk
(Likelihood/
Consequences)

Evaluate the Risk
The level of risk

Manage the Risk
Assess the options

Review
Nominate who will review after the event/activity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuity of Education and Care Policy

NQS


QA6

6.3.2

Continuity of learning and transitions for each child are supported by sharing relevant information and clarifying responsibilities.

QA7

7.1.3

Every effort is made to promote continuity of educators and co-ordinators at the service.


Aim

We aim to ensure the continuity of education and care of all children attending the service in the absence of their family members and/or primary carers. Our service will strive to ensure that all children feel comfortable and secure whilst being educated and care for at the service.

Related Policies

Additional Needs Policy
Educator and Management Policy
Education, Curriculum and Learning Policy
Excursion Policy
Food, Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Sleep, Rest, Relaxation and Clothing
Staffing Arrangements Policy

Implementation

Employment of Regular Educators

  • When our service employs casual educators, or where volunteers and work experience students are present at the service, these persons will be engaged in an induction process that familiarises them with the service environment and any needs of children.
  • The service policies and procedures, an educator handbook and description of their roles and responsibilities at the service will be available to the abovementioned persons.
  • The service will seek to make use of the same casual staff where possible. This will ensure that casual educators are able to familiarise themselves with the service environment, expectations, and routine and children and their families.
  • The service will seek to employ casual educators on a regular day where possible. This will ensure that casual educators are able to familiarise themselves with the children and their families attending the service on that day. Building positive relationships between educators, children and families will encourage effective continuity of care.
  • Where possible and without undue delay, regular educators will inform family members via the service newsletter of any changes to staffing that will be occurring.
  • Casual educators are encouraged, and should be encouraged by the service, to display a photo of themselves with an introductory paragraph about them to help children and their families familiarise themselves.

Learning and Transitions

  • Throughout each day, educators will communicate with educators about the experiences of children throughout the day to help provide continuity of education and care when the service has split shifts. This will include information on the attendance and non-attendance of children at the service.
  • Children will be supervised when transitioning to and from the service (excursions) and within the service.
  • When children return to the service after an absence, educators will provide support to children.
  • Educators will help children transition between rooms and settings.
  • To assist children transition to formal schooling, the service will support children to liaising with local primary schools. Children with additional needs will also be assisted by specialist support services. We will develop plans to assist children transition to formal schooling.
  • Individuals who are authorised to deliver and collect children will be encouraged to share information their child each day.
  • The service will regularly promote the important of the continuity of education and care for all children and educators.
  • As a part of our commitment to the Early Years Learning Framework, our service requires families to complete ‘What You Did on the Weekend Sheets’ and provide regular information to enhance their child’s learning at the service.

Routine to Promote Continuity
A sense of routine is important along with smooth transitions as they allow staff to -

  • Meet each child’s needs.
  • Have one-on-one interactions with children and build strong relationships

When planning a transition staff will -

  • Talk to children to prepare them, giving them advice as to what is happening next and when.
  • Talk with families to see if all their child’s needs are being met.
  • Ensure that the routine has flexibility to allow requests and suggestions from staff, families and children.

Make use of familiar and favourite items of a child.

Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 11/2/2014 Date for next review: 11/2/2015

Cystic Fibrosis Policy

NQS


QA2

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations


Regs

90

Medical conditions policy

91

Medical conditions policy to be provided to parents

92

Medication record

93

Administration of medication

94

Exception to authorisation requirement—anaphylaxis or asthma emergency

95

Procedure for administration of medication

96

Self-administration of medication

EYLF


LO3

Children are happy, healthy, safe and connected to others.

Educators promote continuity of children’s personal health and hygiene by sharing ownership of routines and schedules with children, families and the community

Educators discuss health and safety issues with children and involve them in developing guidelines to keep the environment safe for all

Aim

The service and all educators will effectively provide care for children with Cystic Fibrosis. The service and all educators will ensure the safety and wellbeing of all children and will adopt inclusive practices to cater for the additional requirements of children with Cystic Fibrosis in a respectful and confidential manner.

Related Policies

Additional Needs Policy
Administration of Authorised Medication Policy
Continuity of Education and Care Policy
Emergency Service Contact Policy
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Relationships with Children Policy

Implementation

The service will ensure all educators are aware of the enrolment of a child with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and have an understanding of the condition and the additional requirements of the individual child. The service will adhere to privacy and confidentiality procedures when dealing with individual health needs.

Confidentiality, privacy, dignity and safety

Young children often enjoy sharing the news and their experiences of living with CF with their classmates. The degree and nature of this sharing should be discussed with parents so that they can support their child in this process.
Information exchange between the family and health professionals and the service is essential to support the child’s learning and enhance peer support. The sharing of information needs to be assessed and negotiated for each child with CF, with due consideration to their needs. Educators need information about routine and predictable emergency care as it affects the child’s access to the curriculum, and their safety.

Health Support Plan

For each individual child enrolled in the service with CF, a Health Support Plan will be developed by the Nominated Supervisor in conjunction with the child’s family. It will be based on the child’s health support needs as identified in their CF care plan and other care information (for example if the child also has asthma or diabetes).
A Health Support Plan for a child with cystic fibrosis should address the following components:

  • overall wellness
  • diet
  • therapy and care
  • internal body temperature control
  • curriculum participation issues and
  • potential emergency/first aid situations.

The information should focus on what educators need to know to provide routine and emergency care. It will be used by educators in planning support for the child.
In addition, a health support plan documents individualised support which educators have agreed to provide in the areas of:

  • first aid
  • supervision for safety
  • personal care, including infection control
  • behaviour support and
  • additional curriculum support to enable continuity of education and care.

Overall Wellness

  • The service and educators need to know if recent/frequent hospitalisation and/or general unwellness mean additional care and consideration. They also need to know of any infection control issues in addition to standard precautions.
  • It is important to the future health of a child with CF, as with all children, to minimise the risk of cross infection of bacteria and viruses from others. This must be balanced with efforts to encourage children with CF to lead as normal lives as possible.
  • Educators will alert the family of a child with CF when a particularly virulent strain of virus is present in the service, as parents may wish to keep their child with CF at home.
  • All children in the service should be encouraged maintain hygienic practices. If possible, a child with CF should, discretely, not be partnered or sit next to another child with an obvious cold or cough.

Diet

  • Children with CF have difficulty maintaining their weight and growth patterns as they cannot absorb essential vitamins, minerals, fat and proteins. For this reason educators need to be aware of each individual child’s dietary requirements as prescribed by a medical professional.
  • Children who need additional food supplements may receive them through a gastrostomy button located in their stomach. There are no routine care issues associated with a gastrostomy button for educators however if the area becomes red or inflamed, parents should be informed as soon as possible
  • Children with CF will often have non-prescription medication such as enzyme tablets, as well as prescription medication such as antibiotics, which the service and educators need to be aware of.

Therapy and Care

  • Some children with CF may require complex/invasive health support, such as physiotherapy, while attending the service. This support should be provided by a visiting nurse or therapist.
  • Some children with CF require nebulised medication prior to physiotherapy. While educators can supervise nebulised medication, this will generally be managed by a visiting health worker. Educators need training before supervising administration of medication via a nebuliser.

Body Temperature Control

  • Children may need to be reminded to adjust their clothing to help maintain their internal body temperature control.
  • A child with CF will have problems with internal temperature control and should be kept at a steady temperature in winter and summer. It is beneficial to place the child with CF in rooms that have heating and cooling where practical.
  • Salt tablets may be required during warm weather. Educators should be informed about the required timing and amount of salt tablets and ensure the child has access to fluids at all times. Medical advice will be considered.

Participation in Education and Care Experiences

  • An increase in fatigue or feeling tired is common for a child with CF. A lot of effort is required of a person with CF, on top of normal childhood activities, to maintain their health. Educators will be aware of this and provide adequate opportunities for rest.
  • During the onset of infections, children with CF may experience difficulty breathing or catching breath. Educators should be aware that, as with other children, breathing difficulties also can be asthma related.
  • Children with CF are continually battling infections or recovering from them, thus resulting in low energy levels and reduced concentration. Educators will be mindful of this when planning daily activities.
  • A regular exercise program is very beneficial to children with CF as it helps loosen mucus, stimulates coughing and helps build up strength and endurance of the breathing muscles. Children with CF will be encouraged to take part in physical activity and exercise, following guidelines from the child’s medical practitioner.
  • Children with CF can become dehydrated much more quickly than other children. In relation to this educators will:
    • encourage frequent drinks during and after exercise, and on warm days
    • ensure salt tablets are taken either before or after exercise on warm days with consideration of medical advice
    • avoid scheduling physical activity during temperature extremes
    • ensure children with CF remain, as far as is practical, in a fairly constant temperature, neither too hot nor too cold.

Potential Emergency Situations

Emergency situations associated with CF are rare.
If children have an intravenous line for medication, there are specific standard first aid responses which may be anticipated:

  • Child reports discomfort, nausea, rashes or general unwellness.

Call family emergency contact. If they cannot be reached, call the nominated cystic fibrosis nurse for advice.

  • Child reports redness, pain, inflammation or swelling at site.

Call nominated cystic fibrosis nurse for advice, and then advise family emergency contact.

  • There is a leakage of some sort from the site.

Call nominated cystic fibrosis nurse for advice, and then advise family emergency contact.

  • A needle or line falls out.

Use standard first aid and apply pressure to stop any bleeding, call nominated cystic fibrosis nurse for advice, then advise family emergency contact.

Supervision for Safety

The child's Health Support Plan may include a range of routine accommodations so they can continue to access learning programs while effectively managing their health care. Accommodations could include:

  • provision of additional time to support children managing their dietary requirements
  • access to fluids and food, and the toilet, as needed
  • rescheduling of physical activity to support body temperature control
  • supportive and sensitive encouragement to participate in physical activity
  • targeted social skills programs: frequent absences mean that some children with cystic fibrosis have difficulty making and retaining friends
  • modification of the program and activities in response to the demands of therapy and treatment

Infection Control Consideration

Educators should be aware that, where there is more than one family in the service with CF, cross-infection is a serious health risk. For this reason, our service will only accept the enrolment of one child with CF at any given time. This is based on guidelines developed under the Cystic Fibrosis in Education and Children’s Services Planning and Support Guide for Education and Children’s Services 2008.

Behaviour Support

As for all children, behaviour expectations for children with CF should be consistent and predictable, and also sufficiently flexible to accommodate periods of stress and other potential mental health issues.


Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Cystic Fibrosis in Education and Children’s Services Planning and Support Guide for Education and Children’s Services 2008
Early Years Learning Framework

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed:18/2/2013 Date for next review: 18/2/2014

 

 

Death of a Child Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

National Regulations


Regs

12

Meaning of serious incident

85

Incident, injury, trauma and illness policies and procedures

176

Time to notify certain information to Regulatory Authority

Aim

Educators or the Nominated Supervisor will ensure that immediate and appropriate action is taken to notify any relevant authorities in the event of the death of a child whilst at the Service.

Related Policies


Emergency Service Contact Policy
Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Medical Conditions Policy

Who is affected by this policy?

Child
Staff
Families
Management

Implementation

Educators will follow and implement this procedure:

  • Attempt CPR pursuant to current guidelines.
  • Call an Ambulance immediately on 000.
  • The Nominated Supervisor will call the parents/guardians of the child and arrange to meet at the Hospital or medical facility.
  • Medical staff will advise parents.
  • Contact Insurance Company.
  • Notify state Police Department.
  • Notify Regulatory Authority

Notification of a Serious Incident

The death of a child being educated and cared for at the service, or following an incident while being educated and cared for at the service, is a “serious incident” under the national law. The Approved Provider will notify the regulatory authority as soon as practicable and within 24 hours of the death using form SI01 Notification of Serious Incident .
The documentation will be kept until the end of 7 years after the death.

Work Health and Safety (OHS) requirements

Victoria is in the process of considering new national OHS laws. Under the new laws:

  • the death of a person is a “notifiable incident”.
  • The approved provider or nominated supervisor must notify WorkCover by telephone or in writing (including by facsimile or email) as soon as possible after the death.
  • Records of the incident must be kept for at least 5 years from the date that the incident is notified.
  • The approved provider/nominated supervisor must ensure the site where the death occurred is left undisturbed as much as possible until an inspector arrives or as directed by WorkCover.

Services should contact WorkCover to determine the notification requirements under current legislation.

Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations
National Quality Standard
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 2007

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:
Management
Employees
Families
Interested Parties

Reviewed: 25/3/2014 Date for next review: 25/3/2015

 

Education, Curriculum and Learning Policy

NQS


QA1

1.1.1

Curriculum decision making contributes to each child’s learning and development outcomes in relation to their identity, connection with community, wellbeing, confidence as learners and effectiveness as communicators.

1.1.2

Each child’s current knowledge, ideas, culture, abilities and interests are the foundation of the program.

1.1.3

The program, including routines, is organised in ways that maximise opportunities for each child’s learning.

1.1.4

The documentation about each child’s program and progress is available to families.

1.1.5

Every child is supported to participate in the program.

1.1.6

Each child’s agency is promoted, enabling them to make choices and decisions and to influence events and their world.

1.2.1

Each child’s learning and development is assessed as part of an ongoing cycle of planning, documenting and evaluation.

1.2.2

Educators respond to children’s ideas and play and use intentional teaching to scaffold and extend each child’s learning.

1.2.3

Critical reflection on children’s learning and development, both as individuals and in groups, is regularly used to implement the program.

National Regulations


Regs

73

Educational programs

74

Information about the educational program to be kept available

75

Information about educational program to be given to parents

76

Documenting of child assessments or evaluations for delivery of educational program

EYLF


LO1 – LO5

All Learning Outcomes under the Early Years Learning Framework will be addressed through our Policy and practices.

Aim

Educators aim to create positive learning environments and guide experiences for each child in conjunction with their family. Educators will observe children and facilitate their learning to provide each child with an individualised portfolio by documenting their learning throughout the year. Children and their families will be encouraged to participate in the ongoing process to promote engaged learning.

Related Policies

Additional Needs Policy
Child Protection Policy
Continuity of Education and Care Policy
Educator and Management Policy
Enrolment Policy
Excursion Policy
Food, Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Orientation for Children Policy
Physical Activity Promotion Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy
Record Keeping and Retention Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Technology Usage Policy

Implementation

Our Educational Leader is Carol Wright.
The role of the educational leader is to work with educators to provide curriculum direction and to ensure children achieve the outcomes of the approved learning framework.


Our service is committed to the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF).
Observations of all children enrolled in our service will be documented and kept for future reference and reflection, through use of portfolios. Children’s portfolios will be available for a child’s family members to look at but remains the property of the Service for the duration of the child’s enrolment. Portfolios will be added to regularly by educators, families and children and reflected upon by educators to ensure programming for each child remains relevant to their interests and developmental stage.


Other Approved Learning Frameworks (current as of December 8, 2011)
Victoria
The Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework

Early Years Learning Framework

  • Each child’s learning will be based on their interests and strengths and guided by our educators.
  • Educators must work in collaboration with families to provide relevant learning experiences for each child, based on their interests and family experiences.
  • Every child will be equally valued and their achievements and learning celebrated.
  • Educators will observe and record the strengths and learning of each child.
  • Educators will work closely with children and families to generate ideas for the curriculum.
  • Learning Outcomes will be linked to the curriculum during and after each child’s learning has occurred. The curriculum must not be pre-programmed to match specific Learning Outcomes.
  • The curriculum will be based on the children’s interests, educators extending children’s interests, spontaneous experiences and family input.
  • Where appropriate, the service will liaise with external agencies and support persons to best educate and care for children with additional needs.
  • Where appropriate, the curriculum (play and learning experiences) will build and develop each child’s Learning Stories, Portfolio and Observations of each child’s strengths and achievements.
  • The curriculum will be evaluated and reflected upon each week by educators.

Learning and Play

  • Children are encouraged to express themselves creatively through a wide variety of indoor and outdoor activities.
  • Children’s fine and gross motor skills are strengthened and developed through a wide variety of both indoor and outdoor activities including manipulative play, block play, sensory play, dramatic play, drawing and other physical activities such as running and skipping.
  • Mathematics and science concepts along with exploration of natural aspects of our environment are encouraged through block play, building, cooking, water play, sensory play, collecting natural materials such as leaves and rocks and gardening.
  • Language development is encouraged through educators modelling language, show and tell, story time, games, poems and dramatic play experiences.
  • Social/emotional and independence skills are strengthened through activities such as role-play, dramatic play, group games and self-help tasks.
  • Music and movement activities encourage physical, social and creative areas of a child’s development.
  • Road safety, hygiene, dental care and nutrition will all be built into the weekly program.

These activities will be supervised and guided by educators to find out how child responds as an individual and also as part of a group. Educators will work in conjunction with families to provide learning experiences that are relevant to each child and tailored to their specific needs. A child’s home language, culture and religious practices will be accepted and included in the program.
From this, educators will assess the child’s needs and plan ways to meet these needs. We evaluate this program every week in order to make sure we stay on target and help each child to reach their full potential. The weekly program will be displayed in the room it takes place in. We welcome any suggestions and are happy to answer questions from family members at any time.

EYLF Learning Outcomes

  1. Children have a strong sense of identity.
  2. Children are connected with and contribute to their world.
  3. Children have a strong sense of wellbeing.
  4. Children are confident and involved learners.
  5. Children are effective communicators.

Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review


The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 4/3/2014 Date for next review: 4/3/2015

Educator and Management Policy

NQS


QA4

4.2

Educators, co-ordinators and educators are respectful and ethical.

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

4.2.2

Educators, co-ordinators and educators work collaboratively and affirm, challenge, support and learn from each other to further develop their skills, to improve practice and relationships.

4.2.3

Interactions convey mutual respect, equity and recognition of each other’s strengths and skills.

QA7

7.2.2

The performance of educators, co-ordinators and educators is evaluated and individual development plans are in place to support performance improvement.

7.3.2

Administrative systems are established and maintained to ensure the effective operation of the service.

7.3.4

Processes are in place to ensure that all grievances and complaints are addressed, investigated fairly and documented in a timely manner.

National Regulations


Regs

168

Education and care service must have policies and procedures

Aim

Our Service aims to ensure that positive working relationships are formed between all educators and management. Educators and management will at all times conduct themselves in an ethical manner and strive to make all interactions positive and compliant with the Service’s philosophy.

Related Policies

Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy

 Code of Conduct

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  • Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  • Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  • Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  • Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  • Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.
  • Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

 The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members and volunteers will:

  • ensure their work is carried out efficiently, economically and effectively. They will act in a professional and respectful manner at all times while at work, giving their full attention to the Service responsibilities and adhering to all Service policies, procedures, laws and regulations.
  • act honestly and exercise diligence in all Service operations. They will carry out all lawful directions, retaining the right to question any direction which they consider to be unethical If uncertain they can seek advice from the Nominated Supervisor, Approved Provider or the Ombudsman.
  • consider all relevant facts and make decisions or take actions fairly, ethically, consistently and with appropriate transparency. If they are uncertain about the appropriateness of a decision or action they will consider:
  • whether the decision or conduct is lawful
  • whether the decision or conduct is consistent with our policies and objectives
  • whether there will be an actual, potential or perceived conflict of interest involving obligations that could influence the business relationship or conflict with business duties
  • comply with our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy when dealing with confidential information and records
  • report (suspected) breaches of the code of conduct to a manager, preferably in writing.
  • include children and families in the decision making process.
  • refrain from developing close personal relationships with children outside work.
  • refrain from using abusive, derogatory or offensive language.

Examples of Appropriate Educator Interactions

  • positive, trustworthy and co-operative relationships with team members.
  • respectful, courteous and empathetic communications and behaviours.
  • complying with Service grievance procedures and resolving workplace conflicts where possible directly with the person concerned, and never through gossip or by including people who are not involved in the issue.
  • valuing cultural differences, diverse viewpoints, and unique contributions.
  • looking for and supporting educators’ strengths not weaknesses.
  • sharing professional resources, knowledge and information.
  • supporting others to meet their professional development goals and needs.
  • recognising the professional achievements of others.
  • sharing information, experiences and expertise about children and families at the Service with team members to enhance children’s learning and development.
  • actively participating in regular meetings at the Service to discuss professional issues and problems.
  • updating team members about meeting outcomes or workplace issues if they have been absent.
  • sharing the work load equitably with team members.
  • using the Educator’s Communication Diaries to communicate messages where shifts make it difficult to convey information face-to-face. These means will ensure all educators are informed on important matters. It is the educator’s responsibility to check the Diaries.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members and volunteers will not:

  • engage in conduct that is detrimental to the professional standing of our Service, is improper or unethical, is an abuse of power, or harasses, discriminates against, victimises, humiliates, intimidates or threatens other educators, staff members, volunteers or visitors at the Service, either directly or indirectly via information technology such as email, text or social media. Additionally they will not support those who do this.
  • accept gifts which exceed $30 in value. If this occurs in circumstances where the gift cannot reasonably be refused or returned, the gift will be immediately disclosed to the Approved provider or Nominated Supervisor. Modest gifts or benefits valued less than $30 may be accepted if they do not create a sense of obligation, are conducted transparently and there are no conflicts of interest.
  • accept an offer of money, regardless of the amount.
  • seek or accept a bribe.
  • acquire personal profit or advantage because of their position (eg through the use of Service information).
  • convert any property of the Service to their own use unless properly authorised.
  • approach other employees , managers or visitors directly on individual matters that don’t concern them.
  • engage in any action in breach of our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, including but not limited to disclosure of confidential Service or customer information, or the improper or illegal use of that confidential information. Confidential information will only be accessed by authorised persons for the purpose intended.
  • engage in or support any action in breach of our Technology Usage Policy or Social Networking Usage Policy, including the use of communication media to search for, download, access, transmit or store any material of an offensive, obscene, pornographic, threatening or abusive nature.
  • drink alcohol or use illicit substances on the Service’s premises or come to the Service under their influence.
  • smoke on the Service’s premises including in the car park.
  • show favouritism towards any child.

Families, visitors and children will:

  • treat all children at the service equally and respectfully.
  • report any suspicious behaviour to the Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider and encourage a safe and supportive Service environment.
  • respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person, regardless of their abilities, gender, religion or cultural background.
  • refrain from bullying, harassing or discriminating against any child or adult at the Service.
  • respect the decisions of educators and staff members and teach children (if adults) to do likewise.
  • tell an educator (if a child) or the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor if we see a any instances of bullying, harassment or discrimination at the Service.
  • cooperate and follow classroom rules.
  • listen to educators’ instructions and follow them.
  • control our emotions and talk to an educator (if a child) if we are feeling upset.
  • speak to an educator (if a child) or the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor if we are worried, concerned or have a grievance about something.

Families and visitors will not:

  • not drink alcohol or use illicit substances while on the service’s premises or come to the Service under their influence.
  • not smoke on the service’s premises including in the car park.

Management Responsibilities

In our service the Approved Provider and the Nominated Supervisor are responsible for:

  • supporting the Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider , Certified Supervisor, Educational Leader , Room Leaders and educators in their role.
  • keeping all service families up to date with relevant issues.
  • recruiting and selecting educators and other staff members.
  • ensuring educators and staff members have the correct qualifications.
  • ensuring educator ratio and qualification requirements are met.
  • ensuring all educators and staff understand their responsibilities under the education and care law and regulations, the National Quality Standard, the Early Years Learning Framework.
  • developing the service policies and ensuring all educators follow our policies and procedures.
  • ensuring all educators, staff, visitors and volunteers are aware of and comply with our Code of Conduct
  • investigating and managing grievances from educators, staff members, families or volunteers (including incidents of workplace bullying) in accordance with our Grievance Guidelines.
  • implementing effective communication and consultation procedures with educators and staff members about workplace issues.
  • promoting the diverse skills and achievements of educators and staff (eg at educator meetings, through regular feedback, by sharing information with families and the community through notices and newsletters.)
  • providing or organising appropriate information, instruction, training or supervision to educators and staff
  • maintaining the financial viability of the Service.

Communication Procedures

To allow effective communication and consultation to take place with educators/staff the Approved Provider / Nominated Supervisorwill use variousmethods of communication including:

  • direct conversations.
  • phone communication including SMS messaging if appropriate.
  • a communication diary.
  • educator meetings.
  • other forms of written communication eg letters, notices, emails.
  • educator appraisals and reviews.

Educator Meetings

(EDUCATOR MEETINGS NEEDS TO BE ADAPTED TO SUIT EACH INDIVIDUAL SERVICE, HOWEVER WE HAVE PROVIDED A GUIDE THAT IS REFLECTIVE OF BEST PRACTICE)
The service will hold one educator meeting a month at a time convenient for all educators. This will take place after hours so all educators can attend and educator to child care ratios are not jeopardised.
Meetings will follow this structure:

  • they will run for approximately 1.5 hours but can run longer if more issues need to be discussed.
  • the Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider will chair the meeting and give a report.
  • the format of the meeting will be made available in the educator diary and any educator who wishes to speak can add their name.
  • in the meeting educators may:
  • raise concerns
  • negotiate solutions for any grievances.
  • receive, share and discuss new information.
  • In regard to the decision making process:
  • if a decision cannot be reached about an issue the Nominated Supervisor will make an informed decision or
  • if there is insufficient information an educator will be chosen by the Nominated Supervisor to research the issue.
  • all decisions made will be made on a trial basis and their effectiveness will be discussed at the next meeting.
  • minutes will be taken at all meetings.

Professional Development and Performance Management

We employ caring, loyal and capable educators who bring a high skill level, appropriate qualifications and a wide and varying amount of experiences to help implement our curriculum and philosophy. To maintain our commitment to quality education and care, we will implement a performance appraisal process.


Performance Management/Appraisal

The Nominated Supervisor will complete a performance appraisal for all educators and staff every 12 months. In addition the Nominated Supervisor will complete a performance appraisal for new educators and staff after they have completed 3 months at the service. The educator or staff member and the Nominated Supervisor will agree on a mutually acceptable date at least 2 weeks prior to the appraisal meeting.
The appraisal process will be used as a tool:

  • to ensure educators and staff are aware of their duties and responsibilities.
  • to discuss the level of performance expected. (The appraisal process is the best way to show evidence of continued poor work performance and allows formal written warnings to occur if necessary. )
  • for indentifying professional development and training needs.

The appraisal meeting will be linked to the educator’s job description and will include:

  • an appraisal of the educator’s performance in relation to their job description.
  • review and if necessary clarification of the job role and its expectations.
  • self assessment of performance by the educator or staff member.
  • two way feedback between the Nominated Supervisor and educator or staff member.
  • discussion of future opportunities within the position.
  • discussion on an action plan for further training.
  • feedback about how the appraisal process could be improved.

Training

The Nominated Supervisor will ensure that funds are set aside for training and development needs in the annual budget. Training will be provided on an equitable basis to all educators and staff and may include:

  • mentoring by appropriate educators/staff
  • in-house workshops run by an external trainer
  • external workshops, seminars etc.
  • formal TAFE, college of University courses.
  • on-the-job training (eg through changes in role or through exchange of information between educators/staff).
  • educator and management exchanges between services.
  • provision of appropriate resources (books, movies, documentaries etc).

Work, Health and Safety Issues
Bullying, Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination occurs when someone is treated less favourably than others because they have a particular characteristic or belong to a particular group of people, such as age, race or gender. Harassment involves unwelcome behaviour that intimidates, offends or humiliates a person because of a particular personal characteristic such as race, age, gender, disability, religion or sexuality. It is possible for a person to be bullied, harassed and discriminated against at the same time.
Various anti-discrimination, equal employment opportunity, workplace relations, and human rights laws make it illegal to discriminate or harass a person in the workplace. Work Health and Safety laws include protections against discriminatory conduct for workers raising health and safety concerns.

Bullying is repeated and unreasonable behaviour towards a worker or a group of workers. Our service will not tolerate bullying in any form because it may have a detrimental effect on the psychological, emotional and/or physical wellbeing, health and safety of our educators and staff. Amendments to the Fair Work Act 2009 make it illegal to bully a person in the workplace from 1 January 2014.
Unreasonable behaviour includes actions that victimise, humiliate, intimidate or threaten and may be intentional or unintentional. It can occur directly and by using information technology such as email, texting and social media. While one incident of unreasonable behaviour is not considered to be workplace bullying, it may escalate and it will not be ignored. Examples include:

  • abusive, insulting or offensive language or comments.
  • unjustified criticism or complaints.
  • continuously and deliberately excluding someone from workplace activities.
  • withholding information that is vital for effective work performance.
  • setting unreasonable timelines or constantly changing deadlines.
  • setting tasks that are unreasonably below or beyond a person’s skill level.
  • denying access to information, supervision, consultation or resources that adversely affects a worker.
  • spreading misinformation or malicious rumours.
  • changing work arrangements, such as rosters and leave, to deliberately inconvenience a particular worker or workers.
  • excessive scrutiny at work.

Reasonable actions taken by the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor to direct or control the way work is carried out is not bullying behaviour. Examples of reasonable behaviour include:

  • setting reasonable performance goals, standards and deadlines.
  • rostering and allocating working hours where the requirements are reasonable.
  • transferring a worker for operational reasons.
  • deciding not to select a worker for promotion where a reasonable process is followed and

documented.

  • informing a worker about unsatisfactory work performance when undertaken in accordance

with any workplace policies or agreements such as performance management guidelines.

  • informing a worker about inappropriate behaviour in an objective and confidential way.
  • implementing organisational changes or restructuring.
  • termination of employment.

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will:

  • ensure all educators, staff, visitors and volunteers are aware of and comply with our Code of Conduct.
  • investigate and manage incidents of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination in accordance with our Grievance Guidelines located in this Policy.
  • consult with educators, staff and volunteers during staff meetings when:
    • identifying the risk of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.
    • making decisions about procedures to monitor and address workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.
    • making decisions about information and training on workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.
    • proposing changes to the way work is performed or rosters managed as this may give rise to the risk of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.
  • provide appropriate information, instruction, training or supervision to educators, staff , visitors and volunteers to minimise the risks to their health and safety from workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.
  • contact the Police if there are incidents of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination that involve physical assault or the threat of physical assault, or a visitor engages in bullying behaviour, harassment and discrimination and refuses to leave the Service.

Educators, staff, visitors and volunteers will:

  • consider whether something they do or don’t do will adversely affect the health and safety of others
  • comply with any reasonable instruction, policy and procedure given by the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor in relation to workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.
  • report all incidents of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination using our Grievance Guidelines.
  • talk to the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor if they have any questions about workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination.

Identifying Workplace Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will minimise the risk of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination occurring by:

  • Identifying the risk of workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination
  • talking to educators, staff and volunteers (or conduct an anonymous survey) to find out if bullying is occurring or if there are unreasonable behaviours or situations likely to increase the risk of bullying, harassment and discrimination.
  • monitoring patterns of absenteeism, sick leave, staff turnover, grievances, injury reports, workers compensation claims and other such records to establish any regular patterns or sudden unexplained changes.
  • watching for any changes in workplace relationships between educators, staff, volunteers, visitors and/or managers
  • seeking feedback on the professionalism of workplace behaviours in exit interviews and from supervisors and where relevant families.
  • monitoring issues raised by our health and safety representatives and health and safety committee. See Work Health and Safety Policy for more information.
  • Implementing measures to prevent and respond to workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination
  • implementing a Code of Conduct.
  • providing educators, staff, volunteers and visitors with information about our bullying, harassment and discrimination policy and relevant procedures at staff meetings, via email and by displaying anti-bullying posters.
  • implementing grievance procedures which deal with bullying complaints in a confidential, reliable and timely way (see Grievance Guidelines).
  • implementing effective performance management processes.
  • clearly defining jobs and seeking regular feedback from educators and staff about their role and

responsibilities.

  • reviewing and monitoring workloads and staffing levels.
  • including educators and staff in decision making which affects their roles and responsibilities.
  • consulting with educators and staff as early as possible about any changes that affect their roles and responsibilities.
  • promoting and modelling positive leadership styles eg communicating effectively and providing constructive feedback both formally and informally.
  • organising relevant leadership training for managers and supervisors eg on performance management.
  • mentoring and supporting new and poor performing leaders, educators or staff.
  • facilitating teamwork and cooperation.
  • ensuring supervisors act in a timely manner on any unreasonable behaviour.
  • Reviewing measures to prevent and respond to workplace bullying,harassment and discrimination

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will implement a review of the bullying, harassment and discrimination policy and procedures if there is an incident of workplace bullying, at the request of a health and safety representative or committee, when new or additional information about bullying becomes available or at the scheduled review date. Information will be obtained from confidential surveys, exit interviews and records of sick leave and workers compensation claims.

Training about Workplace Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will organise face-to-face training, role plays and group work to ensure all educators, staff and volunteers can recognise workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination. Training will cover:

  • our bullying, harassment and discrimination policy and procedures
  • measures used to prevent bullying, harassment and discrimination from occurring
  • how to report workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination
  • how bullying, harassment and discrimination reports will be responded to
  • where to go for more information and assistance.

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor, and other educators and staff who may be involved in resolving workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination will be familiar with conflict resolution skills and undertake training in that area if required.

Stress Management Guidelines

If an educator feels stressed in any way they should:

  • approach the Nominated Supervisor and talk together to see if the situation can be remedied in any way.
  • approach their team leader, the Approved Provider, or if relevant a Union official if the educator feels unable to approach the Nominated Supervisor.
  • accept opportunities to have stress alleviated (including counselling if recommended).

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will:

  • discuss the cause of the stress with the educator or staff member and discuss viable options to alleviate it.
  • refer educator/staff member to counselling if required.
  • monitor and review the effectiveness of educator stress management procedures.
  • monitor workloads to ensure educator is not overloaded or overwhelmed.
  • monitor overtime hours and regular working hours to ensure educator is not overworked.
  • monitor holidays to ensure educator is taking, or at least aware of, their entitlements.
  • ensure that bullying and harassment is not taking place.
  • be aware that educators may be suffering personal stress e.g. a death in the family or separation and offer additional support.
  • raise any issues in a sensitive manner.
  • support an educator or staff member on stress leave.
  • work with the educator or staff member on stress leave to set up at return to work plan.
  • monitor and discuss with the educator /staff member their stress levels in the workplace after they return to work.

Managing Breaches and Complaints/Grievances

All breaches of our Code of Conduct (including corruption, maladministration and waste of resources) and complaints or grievances from educators, staff members, families, visitors and volunteers associated with the workplace will be managed in line with our Grievance Guidelines.
This includes incidents of bullying, discrimination and harassment at the Service. Our Service takes any incident of (alleged) bullying, discrimination or harassment very seriously because it can cause significant health and wellbeing issues for employees.

Grievances can occur in all workplaces and handling them properly is important for maintaining a safe, healthy, harmonious and productive work environment. Documented grievance procedures are important because:

  • staff and visitors need to know a process exists for receiving and managing grievances and complaints fairly, impartially, promptly and thoroughly.
  • they help to ensure small issues or problems do not escalate.
  • supervisors and managers need to be aware of issues causing conflict.
  • documentation provides evidence and a record of the grievance and the outcome.
  • complaints facilitate continuous improvement of Service operations.

Grievance Guidelines

These procedures explain the procedure for reporting and managing grievances, the roles and responsibilities of educators, staff and managers and the potential consequences of breaching our policies and procedures and Code of Conduct.

Educators, staff, volunteers and visitors will:

  • raise the grievance or complaint directly with the person they have grievance with. Both parties should try to resolve the issue and develop solutions to ensure the problem does not happen again. Discussions should be based on the principles of privacy, confidentiality, respect and open-mindedness, will not involve other educators, staff, volunteers or visitors (eg parents) and will take place away from children.
  • raise the grievance or complaint with the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor (or another manager/supervisor if the grievance involves the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor) if they are unable to resolve the concern, or feel uncomfortable raising the matter directly with the person concerned. The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor (or other manager) may ask for the issue to be put in writing. Employees should provide all relevant information, including what the problem is, any other person involved in the problem and any suggested solution. Educators are encouraged to communicate openly about the issue.
  • raise any grievance involving suspected or actual unlawful activity (including bullying) with the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor immediately and privately.
  • be confident that their concerns will be thoroughly investigated, but aware that the outcome may not result in the action requested.

Union members may seek assistance or support from their trade union at any time.

Educators, staff, volunteers and visitors will not:

  • become involved in complaints or grievances that do not concern them. This is neither ethical nor likely to advance the grievance process or outcome.
  • raise complaints with an external complaints body, such as a court or Tribunal, without exhausting our grievance procedures.

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will:

  • treat the complaint seriously and deal with it as a matter of priority in a confidential and impartial manner.
  • discuss the issue with the complainant within 24 hours of receiving the verbal or written complaint
  • properly investigate and fairly and impartially consider the issue. This will include:
  • reviewing the circumstances and facts of the complaint (or breach) and inviting all affected parties to provide information where appropriate and relevant
  • discussing the nature of the complaint (or breach) and giving an educator, staff member, volunteer or visitor an opportunity to respond. To encourage teamwork and respect, the issue may be discussed at an educator meeting if the privacy of the people involved can be protected.
  • allowing them to have a support person present during an interview (eg health and safety representative, however this does not include a lawyer acting in a professional capacity)
  • providing the manager or employee with a clear written statement outlining the outcome of the investigation.
  • advise the complainant and all affected parties of the outcome within 7 working days of receiving the verbal or written complaint.
  • If the complaint has been put in writing, or the parties involved request a written response, the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will provide a written response outlining the outcome. If a written agreement about the resolution of the complaint is prepared, all parties must agree it accurately reflects the resolution.
  • If the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor decides not to proceed with the investigation after initial enquiries, he or she will give the complainant the reason/s in writing.
  • keep appropriate records of the investigation and outcome, and store those records in accordance with our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy and Record Keeping and Retention Policy.
  • monitor ongoing behaviour and provide support as required.
  • ensure the parties are protected from victimisation.
  • offer external review by a Tribunal or alternate organisation where employees, visitors and volunteers are unhappy with the outcome of the grievance procedure. Workplace bullying matters may be referred to the Fair Work Commission which can direct employers to take specific actions against workplace bullies or the Work Health and Safety (WHS) Regulator which may investigate whether WHS duties have been contravened.
  • request feedback on the grievance process using a questionnaire.
  • track complaints to rectify identify recurring issues within the Service.
  • notify the regulatory authority within 24 hours if a complaint alleges the safety, health or wellbeing of a child is being compromised. Please refer to our Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy.

Outcomes may include:

  • gaining an apology and a commitment that certain behaviour will not be repeated and monitoring this over time.
  • education and training in relevant laws, policies or procedures (eg bullying awareness, leadership skills).
  • assistance in locating relevant counselling services.
  • disciplinary procedures including a verbal or written warning, termination of employment or transfer to a different position at the Service.
  • redressing any inequality which occurred to the complainant.
  • providing closer supervision.
  • modifying Service policies and procedures.
  • developing new policies and procedures.

Outcomes will take into consideration relevant industrial relations principles and guidelines and make provision for procedural fairness. The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will consider:

  • the number of complaints (or breaches).
  • the opportunities given to adhere to a policy or procedure and/or change behaviour.
  • the opportunities given to respond to the allegations.
  • the seriousness of the complaint (or breach), and whether it impacted the safety and welfare of other employees, volunteers or visitors.
  • whether a policy, procedure or complaint is reasonable.

New and Returning/StaffOrientation

Before a new educator or staff member commences their job the Nominated Supervisor will:

  • show them around the service, allow them to spend some time in their designated room, introduce them to other educators and staff, children and families.
  • Ensure they know where we store the First Aid Kit(s), emergency asthma kits, Epi-pens and children’s medication, which educators hold first aid qualifications, and who has undertaken asthma and anaphylaxis training.
  • Give them a copy of the Staff Handbook.
  • Highlight all policies, procedures, our Code of Conduct and the Service philosophy, and ensure they know where the Policy and Procedures Manual is and how to access it at all times.
  • Highlight relevant legislation including the Education and Care Services National Law and Regulations, Child Protection, Work Health and Safety (WHS), Anti-Discrimination, Bullying and Privacy and Confidentiality.
  • Ensure they know under which industrial award/ agreement they are employed and how to access it.
  • Ensure they are familiar with Work Health and Safety (OHS) principles and child protection principles, particularly the procedures and safeguards that apply in the Service.
  • Provide them with necessary forms in regards to taxation, superannuation and payment of salary.
  • Advise them about the Service’s management structure.
  • Provide them with a copy of their Job Description and go through it with them.
  • Clarify any questions they have.

The Nominated Supervisor will meet with the new educator or staff member at the end of their first week to clarify any questions they may have or resolve any issues that may have arisen including any training needs they have identified.

Return from Extended Leave

The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will work with both the educator who has been on leave and educators at the Service to ensure a smooth return to work by:

  • encouraging the educator to visit a few days before they return to work to reacquaint themselves with the environment and take in any changes.
  • notifying the educator of any policy changes.
  • notifying families of the educator’s return.
  • offering training and development if necessary.
  • discussing any special conditions or considerations and drawing up an appropriate plan to manage these.

If the period is due to an illness the educator must produce a medical certificate stating they are fit to return to work.

Work Experience Students and Volunteers

The Service is happy to support Work Experience Students and Volunteers in their efforts to become Early Childhood Professionals. They will be encouraged to the qualifications necessary to work with children under the National Quality Framework.

Work Experience Students and Volunteers MUST follow all policies and procedures at the service.

Educators will:

  • maintain open communication with Work Experience Students and Volunteers along with their practicum teachers.
  • support all students and volunteers undertaking work experience needs during their placement.
  • pass relevant skills and knowledge onto each student and volunteer.
  • ensure all educators are provided with relevant feedback about tasks that the student is required to complete in the service as part of their practicum.
  • be aware of student and volunteer expectations.
  • have the time and capabilities to support each student and volunteer in their placement.


Work Experience Students and Volunteers will:-

  • learn about the children through observation and practical experience.
  • develop skills and abilities needed to care for and educate children.
  • learn about working as part of a team in the Early Childhood Profession.
  • learn strategies employed when working in a team environment.
  • learn skills already acquired by qualified educators in the Service.
  • become familiar with families and children in the Service.
  • keep educators aware of all written work requirements.


METHOD:

The Nominated Supervisor or Approved Provider will appoint an educator to be ‘Student Supervisor,’ arrange a pre-placement visit for the student or volunteer and inform those at the Service when this will occur. Families will also be informed when Work Experience Students and Volunteers are present at the service and about their role and hours they will be spending at the Service.
During the visit the Supervisor will:

  • give the student or volunteer times/hours and dates of the placement.
  • give the student a student package.
  • take the student or volunteer on a tour of the Service.
  • introduce the student or volunteer to educators and their Room Leader.

Work Experience Students and Volunteers will:

  • inform the Student Supervisor in writing of what will be expected of them by their training body, University or School, or any other training organisation, and provide time sheets and evaluation forms. If this has not happened during the pre-placement visit it will occur on the Student’s first day.
  • work different shifts to gain knowledge of different aspects of Service operations.
  • bring in a photo and a short statement with:
    • name
    • time they will be at the Service
    • what it is they are studying.
  • discuss with the Student Supervisor any problems they may be experiencing.


The Room Leader will:

  • discuss progress of written work and performance with the student and volunteer.
  • discuss any issues raised by the student with the Student Supervisor.


Fail Procedure:
If educators feel that the student is at risk of failing their practicum, the following steps will be taken:

  • Room Leader will alert the Student Supervisor of any concerns with the student.
  • Both the Student Supervisor and the Room Leader will discuss these issues with the Student.
  • The Student Supervisor will arrange for the students teacher to visit the Service and discuss issues that have arisen.
  • The student’s educational institution will ultimately determine the outcome of the practicum.


Termination of Practicum:
Termination of student’s placement will occur if the student:

  • harms or is at risk of harming a child in their care.
  • is under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  • has disregard for the Service and fails to notify the Service if unable to attend
  • is observed using repeated inappropriate behaviour at the Service.
  • does not comply with all policies and procedures addressed in the student package.
  • does not provide the photo with an introduction on commencement.

Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004
Fair Work Act 2009
Bryant, L. (2009). Managing a Child Care Service: A Hands-On Guide for Service Providers. Sydney, Community Child Care Co-Operative.
Dealing with Employee Work-related Concerns and Grievances Policy and Guidelines: NSW DPC
Preventing and Responding to Workplace Bullying: Safe Work Australia Draft Code of Practice
Anti-bullying jurisdiction: FairWork Commission

 Review

The policy and our code of conduct will be reviewed annually by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 13.3.2014 Date for next review: 13.3.2015

Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

National Regulations


Regs

168(2)(e)

Policies and procedures in relation to emergency and evacuation

97

Emergency and evacuation procedures

98

Telephone or other communication equipment

EYLF


LO3

Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing.

Aim

In the event that the service needs to be evacuated, we aim to conduct this in a rehearsed, timely, calm and safe manner to secure the safety of each person using the service. The safety and wellbeing of each child, educator and person using the service is paramount above any other consideration in the time of an emergency or evacuation. Any other procedures will be carried out only if it is safe to do so.

Related Policies

Emergency Service Contact Policy
Lockdown Policy
Incident, Injury and Trauma and Illness Policy
Administration of Authorised Medication Policy
Death of a Child Policy
Medical Conditions Policy

 Implementation

Our service will conduct a risk assessment to identify potential emergencies that could affect our service and use this to prepare emergency and evacuation procedures. An evacuation may be necessary in the event of a fire, chemical spill, bomb scare, earthquake, siege, flood etc.

Emergency and Evacuation Procedures and Drills

  • Emergency and evacuation procedures that are based on the service’s floor plans will be prominently displayed in the following locations that are near each exit –
      • On the Exit Doors
  • The service will maintain an up-to-date and compact register of emergency telephone numbers that must be taken in an emergency or evacuation that is to be located in the following location –
      • In the emergency bag
  • Emergency telephone numbers will be displayed prominently throughout the service in the following locations, including near telephones or available near mobile phones –
      • Near each phone
  • The service will ensure educators are provided with training on how to use fire extinguishers, fire blankets and other emergency equipment that must be kept fire in the following locations –
      • Somerville Childcare & Kindergarten
    • Fire extinguishers, fire blankets and other emergency equipment will be tested as recommended by the manufacturer by recognised authorities. All tests must be documented.
  • Emergency and evacuation procedures will be discussed with families and regular information will be provided to families. Families will also receive written notification from the service.
  • The Nominated Supervisor is responsible for ensuring that all educators, including relief educators and staff members, are aware of the service’s policy and procedures relating to Emergency Management and Evacuation.
  • Informal games and discussions will be used to familiarise children with the service’s evacuation and emergency procedures.

Rehearsal Evacuation Drill (Every Three Months)

  • The service will add to each child’s sense of security, predictability and safety by conducting rehearsal evacuation drills every three months. All persons present at the service during the evacuation drill must participate accordingly.
  • Rehearsal evacuation drills must be documented.
  • The educator places a fire symbol for another user to find and sound the alarm (smoke alarm). When the alarm is heard, the children will drop what they are doing and go with an educator to the designated safe area. This safe area may be a designated area outside the services boundary and will be determined by the location of the fire symbol. This procedure will be necessary to allow emergency vehicles access without risk to educators or children.
  • Our service’s emergency and evacuation safe area is located at –
    • In the backyard next to the gate & move into the car park if required.

Role of Educators

  • Immediately when the alarm sounds, educators will return to the group with which they are working if it is safe to do so. Educators will then assist with the evacuation.
  • Educators are to ensure that sign in/out rolls remain in the vicinity of that particular group of children at all times and if evacuation is required that a primary carer collect that roll in the process of evacuating children.
  • After the alarm has been raised, group children and evacuate through the nearest exit to the designated safe area with the children’s sign in/out roll.
  • Primary carer to call roll and settle children.
  • Supervise and reassure children.

Nominated Supervisor’s Role:

  • Collect educator sign in book, a phone, emergency contact box and backpack.
  • Check toilet, kitchen, playrooms and cot rooms.
  • Ring 000 as soon as possible.
  • Follow children and other educators to designated area.
  • Oversee and check attendances of children, educators, volunteers, families and visitors.
  • Supervise and reassure children.

Emergency Communication Plan

  • At all times, the service will have access to a telephone (such as fixed-line telephone, mobile phone, satellite phone, 2-way radio, video conferencing equipment)
  • The service has a main telephone available at the following location to be used during an emergency –
    • On the office desk
  • If there is a loss of electricity, a backup telephone is available and always ready for use at the following location –
    • The person in-charge will take their person mobile phone also located at the front desk
  • If there is a complete loss of electricity and the telephones at the service are not available, a mobile phone will be provided and ready to use at all times to ensure educators can use it to make emergency contact.

Maintenance of Fire Equipment

Services will have some or all of the following fire safety equipment depending on which building regulations and provisions apply. These requirements are in the Building Code of Australia, Australian Standards and State building regulations and local council requirements. All fire equipment at our service will be maintained as per the legal standards. Our equipment will be checked as required as per the timeframes below.



Key

Inspection Procedure of Fire Safety Installations (F.S.I)

1. Inspect for obvious visual faults.
2. Inspect for faults and witness test of F.S.I by a competent person
3. Inspect for faults where possible and accept logbook details of F.S.I
4. Check Building file for details of any extra requirements.

Required Record of Keeping Fire Safety Installations (F.S.I)

L = log book required
R = record of maintenance required
T = Metal tag on F.S.I or service details/service label
(Y) = Weekly test may be omitted refer AS 1851-2005

 

Fire Fighting Equipment


Special Fire Service

Inspection Procedures for FSI

Required Record Keeping for FSI

Maintenance Schedule

Annual Survey of Installation

Maintenance Standard or Building Preference

Wk

Mth

3 Mth

6 Mth

12 Mth

3 Yr

5 Yr

 

 

Fire Mains

1

 

 

 

 

Y

Y

Y

 

 

1851-Section 2 & 4

Fire Hydrants (including internal & external hydrants, boosters connection/s and water storage tanks

2

L-T

 

 

 

Y

Y

 

Y

Y

1851- Section 4

Fire Pumpsets

2

L-T

(Y)

Y

 

Y

Y

 

Y

Y

1852 – Section 3

Fire Hose Reels

2

R-T

 

 

 

Y

Y

 

 

Y

1851- Section 14

Fire Extinguishers (Portable)

2

R-T

 

 

 

Y

Y

 

Y

Y

1851- Section 15

External agencies will be employed to assist the service with this maintenance if no currently employed educators are qualified to complete the maintenance checks.


Sources

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Australian Standards 1851-2005 “Maintenance of Fire Protection Systems and Equipment”
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families

Date Last reviewed: 18/3/2014 Date for next review: 18/3/2015

Emergency Service Contact Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

National Regulations


Reg

97

Emergency and evacuation procedures

98

Telephone or other communication equipment

EYLF


LO3

Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing.

Aim

In the event that the service needs to be evacuated, we aim to conduct this in a rehearsed, timely, calm and safe manner to secure the safety of each person using the service. The safety and wellbeing of each child, educator and person using the service is paramount above any other consideration in the time of an emergency or evacuation. Any other procedures will be carried out only if it is safe to do so.
An evacuation may be necessary in the event of a fire, chemical spill, bomb scare, earthquake, siege, flood etc.

Related Policies

Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy
Lockdown Policy
Incident, Injury and Trauma and Illness Policy
Administration of Authorised Medication Policy
Death of a Child Policy
Medical Conditions Policy

Implementation

Triple Zero logo
When you call Triple Zero (000)

  • Do you want Police, Fire or Ambulance?
  • Stay calm, don't shout, speak slowly and clearly
  • Tell us exactly where to come. Give an address or location.

Triple Zero text Emergency Call 106 logo
If you are deaf or have a speech or hearing impairment call 106

  • This is a Text Emergency Call, not SMS
  • You can call from teletypewriters
  • Tell us which service you need and where to come

How to call Triple Zero (000)

  • Stay focused, stay relevant, stay on the line
  • The Triple Zero (000) service is the quickest way to get the right emergency service to help you. You can contact Police, Fire or Ambulance in life threatening or emergency situations.

Assess the situation

  • Is someone seriously injured or in need of urgent medical help?
  • Is your life or property being threatened?
  • Have you just witnessed a serious accident or crime?
  • If you answered YES call Triple Zero (000).

Make your call

  • Stay calm and call Triple Zero from a safe place
  • When your call is answered you will be asked if you need Police, Fire or Ambulance
  • If requested by the operator, state your town and location
  • Your call will be directed to the service you asked for
  • When connected to the emergency service, stay on the line, speak clearly and answer the questions
  • Don't hang up until the operator tells you to do so.

Providing location information

  • You will be asked where you are
  • Try to provide street number, street name, nearest cross street and the area
  • In rural areas give the full address and distances from landmarks and roads as well as the property name
  • If calling from a mobile or satellite phone, the operator may ask you for other location information
  • If you make a call while travelling, state the direction you are travelling and the last motorway exit or town you passed.

Instructions from the operator

  • The operator may ask you to wait at a pre-arranged meeting point to assist emergency services to locate the incident

Other languages and text based services

  • People with a speech or hearing impairment can use the One Zero Six (106) text based service
  • If you can't speak English you can call Triple Zero (000) from a fixed line and ask for 'Police', 'Fire', or 'Ambulance'. Once connected you need to stay on the line and a translator will be organised
  • Further information in several community languages can be found on the Emergency information in other languages page.

Other things you can do

  • Keep the Triple Zero (000) number beside telephones
  • Teach children and visitors that the emergency number to call in Australia is Triple Zero (000)
  • Teach children when and how to use Triple Zero.

 Sources


Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Australian Government, Attorney General’s Department, Australian Emergency Management

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 25/3/2014 Date for next review: 25/3/2015

Enrolment Policy

NQS


QA2

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.

2.2.1

Healthy eating is promoted and food and drinks provided by the service are nutritious and appropriate for each child.

2.3.1

Children are adequately supervised at all times.

2.3

Each child is protected.

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

QA6

6.1

Respectful supportive relationships with families are developed and maintained.

6.1.1

There is an effective enrolment and orientation process for families.

6.2

Families are supported in their parenting role and their values and beliefs about child rearing are respected.

National Regulations


Regs

77

Health, hygiene and safe food practices

78

Food and beverages

79

Service providing food and beverages

80

Weekly menu

88

Infectious diseases

90

Medical conditions policy

92

Medication record

93

Administration of medication

96

Self-administration of medication

97

Emergency and evacuation procedures

99

Children leaving the education and care service premises

100

Risk assessment must be conducted before excursion

101

Conduct of risk assessment for excursion

102

Authorisation for excursions

157

Access for parents

160

Child enrolment records to be kept by approved provider and family day care educator

161

Authorisations to be kept in enrolment record

162

Health information to be kept in enrolment record

168

Education and care service must have policies and procedures

173

Prescribed information is to be displayed

177

Prescribed enrolment and other documents to be kept by approved provider

181

Confidentiality of records kept by approved provider

183

Storage of records and other documents


EYLF


LO1

Children feel safe, secure, and supported

Aim

To ensure that each child’s enrolment is completed as per our legal requirements. Additionally, we aim to ensure that each child and family receives an enrolment and orientation process that meets their needs, allowing the family and child to feel safe and secure in the level of care that we provide.

Related Policies

Additional Needs Policy
Administration of Authorised Medication Policy
Child Protection Policy
Excursion Policy
Food, Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
HIV AIDS Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Orientation for Children Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Record Keeping and Retention Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Sleep, Rest, Relaxation and Clothing Policy
Unenrolled Children Policy

Who is affected by this policy?

Children
Families
Educators

Implementation

Our service accepts enrolments of children aged between 0-6 years.

Enrolments will be accepted providing:

  • The maximum daily attendance does not exceed the approved number of places of the service.
  • Child-educator ratios are maintained across the service.
  • A vacancy is available. (Please see Priority of Access Guidelines below.)

Priority of Access Guidelines:

Children who are enrolled at the centre or whose families are seeking a place at the centre will be given Priority of Access in accordance with the guidelines that have been established by the Department of Family and Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.
Below are the Priority of Access levels which the centre must follow when filling vacancies.

  1. A child at risk of serious abuse of neglect.
  2. A child of a single parent/guardian who satisfies, or of parents/guardians who both satisfy the work/training/study test under Family Assistance Legislation Amendment (Child Care) Act 2010.
  3. Any other child.

Within these three categories priority is also given to the following children:

  • Children in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.
  • Children in families which include a disabled person.
  • Children in families on low income.
  • Children in families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  • Children in socially isolated families.
  • Children of single parents/guardian.

Upon enrolment families will be notified of their priority and advised that if the service has no vacancies and their child’s position is a priority 3 under the Priority of Access Guidelines, it may be required that their child leave or reduce their days in order to make a place for a higher priority child.

Enrolment:

When a family has indicated their interest in enrolling their child in our service, the following will occur:

  • A tour of our service. During this tour, the educator conducting the tour will give the family information about the service including, but not limited to, programming methods, meals, incursions, excursions, inclusion, fees, policies, procedures, our status as a Sun Smart service, regulations for our state and the licensing and assessment process, signing in and out procedure, the National Quality Framework, room routines, educator qualifications, introduction of educator in the room the child will be starting in and educator and parent communication. Families are also invited to ask any questions they may have.
  • Families are given a copy of the Parent Handbook to read and are invited to ask questions.
  • Discussions are held between office staff and families regarding availability of days, a start date and tailoring an orientation process to suit the needs of the family and child. Families are informed of the Priority of Access Policy, and have their position assessed as to how they place within this system. Any matters that are sensitive of nature, such as discussing a child’s medical needs, Court Orders, parenting plans or parenting orders, will be discussed privately with the Nominated Supervisor at this time. We request that parents begin to fill out enrolment forms at that time, and discuss their child with us so we can accommodate their needs in the service from the first day they start with us. Should a child use English as a second language, or speak another language at home, we request that families provide us with some key words in the languages the child speaks at this time so that educators can learn the words.
  • Families also need to contact the Family Assistance Office (Service link) to have their eligibility for Child Care Benefit assessed. If these details are available, we will complete the child’s formal enrolment. Should a family still need to access this information, we will complete an informal enrolment until these details are finalised.
  • As per our Orientation for Children Policy, families will be invited to bring their child into the service at a time that suits them so the child and family can familiarise themselves with the environment.
  • Before the child begins their first day with us, the service must have all required documentation for the child. The child will not be accepted into the service without this being completed.

On the child’s first day:

  • The child and their family are welcomed into their room for the first day.
  • The Nominated Supervisor and parents will ensure all details are finalised and complete and sign the Orientation Checklist.

Other information about our service’s enrolment includes:

  • We will try and accommodate families so that children from the same family can attend our service. This will be carried out in line with our obligations under the Priority of Access Policy.
  • We encourage all families to consider immunising their children. Please see our Immunisation Policy for further information.
  • Enrolment of educator’s children at the service is generally not encouraged.
  • In accordance with the National Law and Regulations, our educators will support each child to manage their own behaviour, respond appropriately to the behaviour of other children and communicate effectively to resolve conflicts. We will also work with each child’s family to support any children with diagnosed behaviour and social difficulties. However, a child’s enrolment at our service may be terminated if the nominated supervisor decides the child’s behaviour threatens the safety, health or well being of any other child at the service. Information and Authorisations to be kept in the Enrolment Record. Our Record Keeping and Retention Policy outlines the information and authorisations that we will include in all child enrolment records.

 

Enrolment Checklist (National)

Director

National Regulations

Part 4.7 – 160, 161, 162.

Nominated Supervisor’s Name

Date:

Nominated Supervisor’s Signature:

Parent ONE Name:

Parent ONE Signature:

Parent TWO Name:

Parent TWO Signature:

Parent THREE Name:

Parent THREE Signature:

  •  

All parts of the Enrolment Form completed and signed where necessary.

 

All relevant information attached as required – court orders, parenting orders, parenting plans relating to powers, duties, responsibilities or authorities of any person in relation to the child or access to the child, the child’s residence or child’s contacts with parents or other person.

 

All relevant information provided as required – cultural, religious, dietary requirements or additional needs.

 

All authorisations are noted and signed by parents in relation to – authority for medical treatment, dental treatment, administration of general first aid products and ambulance transportation.

 

All declarations of consent for being an emergency contact person are signed by the Authorised Nominee.

 

Relevant health information is included – medical practitioner or medical service, Medicare number, dental practitioner or service, healthcare needs including medical conditions, allergies, anaphylaxis or at risk of anaphylaxis.

 

All relevant information attached as required – medical management plan, anaphylaxis medical management plan or risk minimisation plan, dietary restrictions and immunisation status.

 

Sunscreen and Photography policies explained and signed where necessary.

 

Parent Information Pack discussed including relevant service policies and procedures.

 

Bond and Administration Fee paid in full.

 

Parents 1, 2 and 3 DOB and CRN provided.

 

Child’s DOB and CRN provided.

 

Child’s Birth Certificate or equivalent cited.

 

All indemnity and permission notes signed.

 

Authorisation signed for the service to take child on regular outings.

 

Authorisation signed for the service for child to participate in incursions.

 

Sign in/out procedure explained.

 

Tour of service and introduction to educators.

 

Medication and Illness procedures explained.

 

Guiding Children’s Behaviour Policy explained and discussed. Parents have acknowledged in writing that their child’s enrolment may be terminated if their child’s behaviour threatens the safety, health and well being of other children.

 

Credit reference check permission form signed.

 

Direct Debit form completed/method of payment for fees established.

 


Sources
Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008
The Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005
Children, Youth and Families Act 2005
Occupational Health & Safety Act 2004
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
A New Tax System (Family Assistance) Act 1999

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Reviewed: 1/4/2014 Date for next review: 1/4/2015

 

Environmental Sustainability Policy

NQS

QA3

3.3.

The service takes an active role in caring for its environment and contributes to a sustainable future.

3.3.1

Sustainable practices are embedded in service operations

3.3.2

Children are supported to become environmentally responsible and show respect for the environment.

QA6

6.1.2

Families have opportunities to be involved in the service and to contribute to service decisions.

6.3

The service collaborates with other organisations and service providers to enhance children’s learning and wellbeing.

6.3.1

Links with relevant community and support agencies are established and maintained

6.3.4

The service builds relationships and engages with their local community.

EYLF

LO2

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

Aim
Our service aims to help children learn about and implement sustainable practices and foster respect and care for the living and non-living environment.
Implementation
Children develop positive attitudes and values about sustainable practices by engaging in learning experiences, joining in discussions that explore solutions to environmental issues, and watching adults model sustainable practices. Children learn to live interdependently with the environment.

Environmental Sustainability and our Curriculum

  • Our educators will promote a holistic, open ended curriculum which explores ideas and practices for environmental sustainability and helps children understand the interdependence between people and the environment by:
    • connecting children to nature through art and play and allowing children to experience the natural environment through natural materials like wood, stone sand and recycled materials, plants including native vegetation, developing education programs for water conservation, energy efficiency and waste reduction.
    • celebrating childrens’ environmental knowledge and sustainable activities.
    • involving children in nature walks, education about plants and gardening and growing plants and flowers from seed.
    • engaging children in learning about the food cycle by growing, harvesting, and cooking food for our service kitchen.
    • using resource kits and information on environmental issues from the Better Business Partnership or resources targeted at early childhood services such as “The Little Green Steps” Resource kits on Water, Waste and Wildlife.
    • enlisting the help of groups with expertise in environmental issues, for example bush care groups, wildlife rescue groups, Clean Up Australia, to deliver elements of our sustainability program
    • acknowledging and celebrating environmental awareness events like Clean Up Australia Day and Walk to School Day.

 

The Role of Educators

  • Our educators will model sustainable practices by embedding sustainability into all aspects of the daily running of our service operations including:
    • recycling materials for curriculum and learning activities
    • minimising waste and effectively using service resources
    • turning off equipment and lights when not in use
    • using the least hazardous cleaning substance appropriate for the situation, for example, ordinary detergent for cleaning dirt from tables and other surfaces.
    • maintaining a no dig vegetable/herb garden
    • incorporating water wise strategies such as drip irrigation and ensuring taps are turned off and leaks fixed.
    • using food that we have grown in meals on our weekly menu
    • implementing environmentally friendly pest management

Partnerships with Families and the Community

  • Our educators will facilitate collaborative partnerships with local community groups, government agencies and private companies to enhance and support childrens’ learning about sustainable practices. We will share their brochures and fact sheets on sustainable practices like recycling, saving water and power and green cleaning with our children and their families. Families will be encouraged to participate in decision making and information sharing about environmental sustainability through our newsletters, parent input forms, wall displays, meetings.

As at May 2012, the NSW Early Childhood Environmental Education Network is developing a tool to assist Early Childhood Services to identify and work towards an Environmentally Sustainable Service with the NQS. The Network’s website has links to many organisations and Government agencies that provide information on sustainable practices at http://www.eceen.org.au/links.htm

Source
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework
Climbing the little green steps 2007: Gosford and Wyong Councils
Environmental Education in Early Childhood (Victoria) Inc
NSW Early Childhood Environmental Education Network

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Excursion Policy

NQS


QA2

2.3.1

Children are adequately supervised at all times.

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations


Reg

100

Risk assessment must be conducted before excursion.

101

Conduct of risk assessment for excursion.

102

Authorisation for excursion.

Aim
The service acknowledges the value of relevant excursions in allowing children to gain a greater insight of the society in which they live, and learn from these experiences. Our service will actively seek to minimise any risks associated with excursions, and respond promptly and appropriately to any emergency whilst on an excursion. Educators will educate children and families regarding safe road (or other transport) and play practices.
Related Policies
Staffing Arrangements Policy
Transportation Policy

Implementation
Excursion Risk Assessment and Planning Process

  • The service must conduct a risk assessment prior to an excursion taking place.
  • Risk assessments are only required once if the excursion is a regular outing. Regular outings are walks, drives or trips to places that we visit regularly and which always have the same risks.
  • The risk assessment must be recorded using the Excursion Risk Assessment Form. Parents will be notified on the Authorisation for Excursion Form that they can access the Excursion Risk Assessments prior to the excursion upon their request. The service must comply with these requests and make all information available to parents if requested.
  • Using the Excursion Risk Assessment Form attached to this policy, the service must take into consideration the following –
    • Any risk that the excursion may pose to the safety, health and wellbeing of any child and identify how these risks will be managed and minimised.
    • Any water hazards.
    • Any risks associated with water-based activities.
    • Transportation (to and from).
    • The ratio of adults and children which must comply with the ratios in the Staffing Arrangements Policy.
    • Specialised skills required (such as life-saving skills).
    • Proposed activities.
    • Proposed duration.
    • Any medical conditions that need to be considered and managed for each child with specific health needs.
  • The Risk Assessment Checklist must also be conducted prior any excursion.
  • A parent or authorised nominee must provide a written authority for each child who is attending the excursion using the Authorisation for Excursion Form. This authorisation only needs to be obtained once every 12 months for regular excursions.
  • Using the Authorisation for Excursion Form, the service will ensure that the emergency contact details for each child are up-to-date.


Transport Considerations

The means of transport must be stated on the permission note.
Buses – ensure that the seating capacity as displayed on the compliance plate is not exceeded. All children must sit on seats, preferably with, or close to, an adult. Seat belt guidelines must be followed depending on the bus. If the bus has seat belts, they must be worn at all times.
Trains – contact the station prior to the excursion to inform them of the time you will be travelling, the destination and the number of children and adults who will be travelling. Arrangements should be made to arrive at the station an adequate amount of time to allow for safe boarding. This will allow the station to inform the train guard so that he / she can hold the train for the period of time for safe boarding and alighting. All children should be seated at all times, with an adult close by. All children should be seated in the one carriage, if possible.
Cars – Any motor vehicle that is used to transport children on excursion (other than a motor vehicle with seating more than nine persons) is fitted child restraints and/or seatbelts that are appropriate for the age and weight of each child, that conform to the Australian Standards, and are professionally installed or checked by an authorised restraint fitter.

Insurance

Any excursion planned must be consistent with the requirements / exclusions of the Public Liability Cover held by the service.


Excursion Risk Assessment photoForm


As a part of the Excursion Risk Assessment Form, the service must complete the following details when planning an excursion -

Time and Date of Proposed Excursion
__________________________________________________________________________________


Reason for Excursion
_________________________________________________________________________________


Proposed Route (to and from)
__________________________________________________________________________________


Destination (s)
__________________________________________________________________________________


Transportation Details (to and from)
_________________________________________________________________________________


Number of Adults Involved
________________________________________________________________________________


Given the risks posted and outlined using the Excursion Risk Assessment, are there any specialised skills to ensure children are adequately and safely supervised at all times during the excursion? Specialised skills could include life-saving skills.
________________________________________________________________________________

Number of Children Involved
_______________________________________________________________________________

Proposed Activities
________________________________________________________________________________


Proposed Duration
__________________________________________________________________________________


Items to Be Taken by the Service (mobile phone, emergency contact details, etc)
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________

Items to Be Taken by the Children
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________

Risk Assessment Checklist
Please circle.


Yes

No

 

Risk Assessment

yes

no

N/A

The service has a timetable for the excursion and an itinerary.

yes

no

N/A

At least 24 hours notice of the excursion has been given to parents, with an itinerary for the excursion.
It is preferable for longer notice to be given where possible

yes

no

N/A

A signed permission for the specific excursion and any specific activity which is to take place during the excursion has been received from the parents. Regular outings can be covered by one form for a period of 12 months.

yes

no

N/A

A list of children attending the excursion is left at the service prior to departure and a copy carried by the Supervisor for the purpose of checking at regular intervals during the course of the excursion.

yes

no

N/A

The Supervisor has ensured that all children are equipped with clothing appropriate for the excursion.
For example - jumpers, sun hats, appropriate footwear, sunscreen.

yes

no

N/A

Educators are able to ensure children have accesses to of shaded areas.

yes

no

N/A

Any excursion planned is consistent with the requirements/exclusions of the Public Liability Insurance Cover held by the service.

yes

no

N/A

A fully stocked first aid kit is taken.

yes

no

N/A

Each child’s emergency contact details are updated and taken.

yes

no

N/A

A mobile phone or change for a phone is organised to take on the excursion.

yes

no

N/A

Medication and a management plan for any children attending the excursion are available and updated.

yes

no

N/A

A designated educator must be assigned to directly supervise any child with a chronic illness/allergic condition.
The educator is to hold the child’s medication and management plan throughout the excursion.


Authorisation for Excursion Form
Our service has organised an excursion for your child to attend. All of the relevant details are provided below for your convenience. The service has conducted an Excursion Risk Assessment which is available for your review upon request. For your child to attend, you are required to read this information and complete the Authority for Excursion Form. To complete this Form, you must be listed on the child’s enrolment record as either their parent or an Authorised Nominee.

Child’s Full Name
__________________________________________________________________________________

Time and Date of Proposed Excursion
__________________________________________________________________________________

Is the Excursion a Regular Outing?
If yes, the Authorisation for Excursion Form will cover the child for 12 months.
Please note that the Authority can be cancelled at any time.
__________________________________________________________________________________

Reason for Excursion
__________________________________________________________________________________

Route (to and from)
__________________________________________________________________________________

Destination (s)
__________________________________________________________________________________

Transportation Details (to and from)
________________________________________________________________________________

The Period the Child will be Away from the Service Premises
__________________________________________________________________________________

Number of Adults Involved and the Anticipated Ratio of Adults-Children
_________________________________________________________________________________

Number of Children Involved
_________________________________________________________________________________

Proposed Activities
_________________________________________________________________________________

Items to Be Taken by the Child and Provided by the Parents
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________

Authority for my Child to Attend the Excursion
Full Name
__________________________________________________________________________________

Relationship to Child
__________________________________________________________________________________

Updated Emergency Contact Details (if different from the child’s Enrolment Form)
___________________________________________________________________________________

Interested in Volunteering to the Attend the Excursion?
__________________________________________________________________________________


By signing the Authorisation for Excursion Form, I agree to and understand the following –

  • My child has my permission to attend the excursion listed. If the excursion is a regular outing, my child has permission to attend for 12 months after the date listed below.
  • I am listed on the child’s Enrolment Form as a Parent or Authorised Nominee.
  • I have read all of the details provided by the service and understand that I can access the Excursion Risk Assessment at the service.
  • The contact details, including all emergency contact details, listed on my child’s Enrolment Form are up-to-date. If not, I have provided the updated contact details above.

Signature
___________________________

Date
___________________________


Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 15/4/2013 Date for next review: 15/4/2014

Family Law and Access Policy

NQF

QA2

2.3.4

Educators, co-ordinators and staff members are aware of their roles and responsibilities to respond to every child at risk of abuse or neglect

National Regulations

Regs

84

Awareness of child protection law

Aim
To ensure that the service is upholding any responsibilities or obligations in relation to family law and access at the service.
Related Policies
Child Protection Policy
Administration of Authorised Medications Policy
Enrolment Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Children
Families
Staff
Management

Implementation
Definitions
Parental Responsibility – means that each parent/guardian has equal responsibility for their children’s welfare, either in the long-term or on a day to day basis and includes matters such as where the children will live and with whom they will have contact. It is not affected by any change in the parents’ relationship, for example if they separate or remarry.
Parenting Orders – are orders that the court will make when parents cannot decide on matters themselves. They change parenting responsibilities and stipulate which parent has what responsibilities. There are 4 types of parenting orders:

  • Residence – an order to say with whom the child lives, including any shared arrangements
  • Contact – an order to say the times that a child may have contact with a parent with whom they are not living, or anyone else who plays an important part in their life, such as a grandparent (contact can either be face to face, or by phone, letters)
  • Child Maintenance – an order that provides for financial support of a child
  • Specific Issues – an order about any other aspect of parental responsibility (this may include the day-to-day care, welfare and development of a child, issues relating to religion, education, sport, or other specific issue)

Residency
The parent with whom the child lives is responsible for day-to-day decisions like:

  • Discipline
  • Going out
  • Clothes
  • Accommodation
  • Pocket money

Residency can be a shared arrangement.
Parents/guardians, regardless of their marital status, have joint and equal legal responsibilities for their children unless there is a Court Order determining otherwise. Service staff members and educators need to be knowledgeable of which parent/guardian has specific legal rights and responsibilities. Thus, the service will need to access any relevant Court Orders issued. Services are not legally able to allow children to leave the Centre without permission of the custodial parent/guardian.
In the case where guardianship and custody is legally defined, the service’s policy must be followed as stated on the enrolment form. When situations change a copy of the Custody Order must be provided to the Service. Where confrontation situations arise over custody the child will be kept at the Service, the custodial parent must be contacted without undue delay and if necessary the Police and/or relevant government departments.
Sources
The above information has been adapted from the Family Court of Australia website 2002www.familycourt.gov.au
Family Law Act 1975
Education and Care National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Fees Policy

NQF

QA7

7.3.2

Administrative systems are established and maintained to ensure the effective operation of the service.

Aim
For parents to pay their child care fees on time.

Related Policies
Orientation for Children Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy

Who is affected by this policy?

Parents

Management

Implementation
The following outlines the how fees can be paid. Fees must be paid on the first morning you child attends the service for the week.

  • Fees can be paid weekly, fortnightly or monthly in advance by cheque, direct deposit of B-pay.
  • Fees are payable in advance for every day that your child is enrolled at the service. This includes pupil free days, sick days and family holidays but excludes periods when the service is closed.
  • Child Care Benefits (CCB) are available to all families who are Australian Residents. To find out their eligibility, families must contact the Family Assistance Office.
  • Child Care Benefits can be received as:
      • A reduction of fees through the service.
      • A lump sum payment to families at the end of the financial year that the Centre is used in.

A receipt will be issued for all fees. This will include the child/children’s full name/s, date of care, date of payment, amount, etc. If the incorrect amount is paid, change will not be given but will be credited to the families account.

Should you wish to end your child’s place at the service or should management make the decision to terminate your child’s place, 2 weeks written notice is required from the ending/terminating party. If this does not occur, 2 weeks fees will be billed to you.

Overdue Fees
Any family who is one or more weeks late with their fees will received a Friendly Fee Reminder. Families can make appointments to speak with the approved provider or nominated supervisor regarding payments if there is a need to do so. Continually not paying fees will put your child/ren’s place/s in the Centre in jeopardy.

Holidays
If families are going away and your child or children will be absent from the centre, please notify the centre 2 weeks prior in writing. A holiday rate will apply if your child is absent for a 1 week block or more, the centre is given a minimum of 2 weeks notice & your account is not in arrears. Holiday rate will not be applied if your account is in arrears.
Sources
Bryant, L. (2009). Managing a Child Care Service : A Hands-On Guide for Service Providers. Sydney: Community Child Care Co-Operative.
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Family Assistance Legislation Amendment (Child Care) Act 2009
Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management,
  • Employees,
  • Family Members
  • Interested parties.
  • Reviewed: 29/4/2012 Date for next review: 29/4/2013

Food, Nutrition and Beverage Policy

NQS

QA2

2.1

Each child’s health is promoted.

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.2.1

Healthy eating is promoted and food and drinks provided by the service are nutritious and appropriate for each child.


National Regulations

Regs

77

Health, hygiene and safe food practices

78

Food and beverages

79

Service providing food and beverages

80

Weekly menu

90

Medical conditions policy

91

Medical conditions policy to be provided to parents

162

Health information to be kept in enrolment record

168

Education and care service must have policies and procedures

EYLF

LO3

Children recognise and communicate their bodily needs (for example, thirst, hunger, rest, comfort, physical activity).

Children are happy, healthy, safe and connected to others.

Children show an increasing awareness of healthy lifestyles and good nutrition.

Educators promote continuity of children’s personal health and hygiene by sharing ownership of routines and schedules with children, families and the community.

Educators discuss health and safety issues with children and involve them in developing guidelines to keep the environment safe for all.

Educators engage children in experiences, conversations and routines that promote healthy lifestyles and good nutrition.

Educators model and reinforce health, nutrition and personal hygiene practices with children.



Aim
Our service aims to promote healthy lifestyles, good nutrition and the wellbeing of all of children, educators and families using procedures and policies. We also aim to support and provide adequately for children with food allergies, dietary requirements and restrictions and specific cultural and religious practices. This dietary information will also be provided to families so they can plan healthy home meals for their child.

Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Enrolment Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma, Illness Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Physical Activity Promotion Policy
Relationships with Children Policy

Implementation
The service has a responsibility to help children attending the service to develop good food habits and attitudes. By working with families and all educators, we will also positively influence each child’s health and good nutrition at home. As stated in the National Regulations (Regulation 79 [4]), we recognise that these requirements do not apply to food or a beverage provided by a parent of family member for consumption by their child at the service.
In order to achieve these habits and attitudes, the Approved Provider and the Nominated Supervisor, who is responsible for overseeing all educators, will –
In relation to the provision of food and beverages

  • Ensure children have access to, and are encourage to access, safe drinking water at all times.
  • Ensure children are offered foods and beverages throughout the day that are appropriate to their nutritional and specific dietary requirements based on written advice from families that is typically set-out in a child’s Enrolment Form. We will choose foods based on the individual needs of children whether they are based on likes, dislikes, growth and developmental needs, cultural, religious or health requirements. Families will be reminded to update this information regularly or as necessary.
  • Children who do not eat during routine meal times or children who are hungry will be provided with foods at periods other than meal times or snack times.
  • Ensure food is consistent with the service’s menu that is based on the Australian Government’s -

Get Up & Grow: Healthy Eating and Physical Activity for Early Childhood (http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/phd-gug-child-cookbook)
And/or
Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents in Australia
(http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/n34.pdf)

  • Families will be encouraged to provide food using these Guidelines.
  • Provide food that is hygienic by following the relevant policies and procedures set out in the Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy.
  • Ensure foods and beverages have a reduced risk of choking.
  • Families will be provided with daily information about their child’s food and beverage intake and related experiences.
  • Provide a weekly menu of food and beverages that are based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines to ensure the provision of food and beverages is nutritious and adequate in quantity.
  • The weekly menu must be displayed in an accessible and prominent area for parents to view. We will also display nutritional information for families and keep them regularly updated.
  • The weekly menu must accurately describe the food and beverages provided each day of the week.
  • Present food attractively.
  • Babies will be fed individually by educators.
  • Age and developmentally appropriately utensils and furniture will be provided for each child.

In relation to promoting healthy living and good nutrition

  • Develop health and nutrition awareness and act to the best of our abilities on cross-cultural eating patterns and related food values.
  • Make meal times relaxed and pleasant and timed to meet the needs of the children. Educators will engage children in a range of interesting experiences, conversations and routines.
  • Discuss food and nutrition with the children.
  • Not allow food to be used as a form of punishment or to be used as a reward or bribe.
  • Not allow the children to be force fed without being required to eat food they do not like or more than they want to eat.
  • Encourage toddlers to be independent and develop social skills at meal times.
  • Establish healthy eating habits in the children by incorporating nutritional information into our program.
  • Talk to families about their child’s food intake and voice any concerns about their child’s eating.
  • Encourage parents to the best of our ability to continue our healthy eating message in their homes. This information will be provided upon enrolment and as new information becomes available.
  • Encourage educators to present themselves as role models. This means maintaining good personal nutrition and eating with the children at meal times.
  • Provide nutrition and food safety training opportunities for all staff including an awareness of other cultures food habits.

Breastfeeding, Breast Milk and Bottle Warming
Healthy lifestyles and good nutrition for each child is paramount. As such, we encourage all families to continue breast feeding their child until at least 12 months in line with recommendations for recognised authorities.
We aim to work with families with children who are still being breastfed and provide a supportive environment by feeding children breast milk supplied by their families.
We will provide a supportive environment for mothers to breastfeed.
Families will be regularly reminded by educators and the service to update the service in regards to their child’s preferences, habits, likes, dislikes, dietary requirements and restrictions.

Breast milk procedure

  • Breast milk that has been expressed should be brought to the service in a clean sterile container labelled with the date of expression and the child’s name.
  • We encourage families to transport milk to the service in cooler bags and eskies; this should be immediately given to educators, who will put it in the refrigerator.
  • We will refrigerate the milk at 4 degree Celsius until it is required.
  • Breast milk will be warmed and/or thawed by standing the container/bottle in a container of warm water.
  • The milk will then be temperature tested by educators before being given to the child.
  • If the service does not have enough breast milk from the family to meet the child’s needs that day, individual families will be consulted on what the service should do in these circumstances.
  • To avoid any possible confusion, we will not store unused milk at the service.
  • Unused milk will be returned to families at the end of the day when they come to collect their child.
  • A quiet, private, lockable space with a comfortable chair will be provided for mothers/women to breastfeed or express milk. A sign will also be placed on the door when the mother/woman is using the facilities.

Educators who Breastfeed at the Service

  • The service also recognises the importance and benefits of breastfeeding and that many women will return to work before they wish to wean their children. Requests for allowances to be made for educators to continue breastfeeding once they have returned to work at the service will be treated sympathetically and reasonably and all efforts will be made to support the educator in her choice to continue breastfeeding her child.
  • On return to work from maternity leave, female educators may seek to change their work arrangements. The returning staff member will have a meeting with the Nominated Supervisor to try and work out an arrangement which suits the educator, the Nominated Supervisor and also the running of the service. The service will provide Lactation Breaks for the educator to express milk or breastfeed her child. The Nominated Supervisor will be reasonably flexible as to when these occur.
  • A quiet, private, lockable space with a comfortable chair will be provided for women to breastfeed or express milk. A sign will also be placed on the door when the educator is using the facilities.
  • If arrangements have been made for the educator’s child to come to the service to breastfed and needs its nappy changed, the educator can use the service’s nappy changing area as long as the relevant policies and procedures are followed.
  • When an educator is in the process of breastfeeding her child or expressing milk, educator to child ratios cannot be compromised. Educators will work to cover the Lactation Break as they would any other break.

Safe Storage and Heating of Babies Bottles (Please display)
Our service will use microwaves to heat Infant Formula/Cow’s Milk. Bottles will be premade and formula will be mixed with cooled boiled water and stored in the fridge until needed.

Microwave Instructions (Please display)
We recognise that microwaves are an efficient and safe way to heat infant formula and cow’s milk. We will not heat breast milk in the microwave as it may destroy some of the breast milk’s properties.
For infant formula or cow’s milk, the service will always:

  • Use microwave safe bottles.
  • Heat a minimum of 120mls of formula/cow’s milk in the bottle to ensure it does not overheat.
  • Only heat formula/cow’s milk that has been adequately refrigerated.
  • Stand the bottle up straight.
  • Always take off the teat/bottle top and leave outside the microwave.
  • Not use microwave ovens with wattage over 700W (or if ovens with a higher wattage are used, heat for less than the following times and take extra care when checking temperature)
  • For a 120ml size bottle – use high setting and heat for less than 30 seconds.
  • For a 240ml size bottle – use high setting and heat for less than 45 seconds.
  • Follow specific manufacturer instructions provided with the microwave.
  • Minimise the risk of uneven heating by adequately rotating and shaking the bottle directly after microwaving. After the teat/bottle top is replaced, invert the bottle at least 10 times and let the bottle sit for 1-2 minutes before testing the temperature.
  • Check the temperature of the formula/milk on the inside of the wrist before giving to the child to ensure contents are at a safe temperature.

Bottle Warmers
Our service will use bottle warmers that have a thermostat control to heat Infant Formula/Cow’s Milk/Breast Milk

  • The service will use the bottle warmer as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Educators will ensure that bottle warmers are inaccessible to children at all times.
  • Bottles will be warmed for less than 10 minutes.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Early Years Learning Framework
National Quality Standard
Food Standards Australia New Zealand
Safe Food Australia, 2nd Edition. January 2001
Get Up & Grow: Healthy Eating and Physical Activity for Early Childhood
Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents in Australia.
Australian Guide for Healthy Eating
Food Safety Standards for Australia 2001
Food Standards Australia and New Zealand Act 1991
Food Standards Australia New Zealand Regulations 1994
Food Act 2003
Food Regulation 2004
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 2001
Dental Association Australia
Infant Feeding Guidelines for Health Workers (National Health & Medical Research Council, 2003) Feeding and Nutrition of Infants and Young Children (World Health Organisation, 2000)
Australian Breast Feeding Association Guidelines

Start Right Eat Right Dept Health SA

 

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Governance Policy

NQS

QA6

6.1.2

Families have opportunities to be involved in the service and contribute to service decisions.

6.2.1

The expertise of families is recognised and they share in decision making about their child’s learning and wellbeing.

QA7

7.1.1

Appropriate governance arrangements are in place to manage the service.

7.3.1

Records and information are stored appropriately to ensure confidentiality, are available from the service and are maintained in accordance with legislative requirements.

7.3.2

Administrative systems are established and maintained to ensure the effective operation of the service.

7.3.3

The Regulatory Authority is notified of any relevant changes to the operation of the service, of serious incidents and any complaints

National Regulations

Reg

168

Education and care services must have policies and procedures

177

Prescribed enrolment and other documents to be kept by approved provider

181

Confidentiality of records kept by approved provider

181-184

Confidentiality and storage of records

Aim
Our service will meet its legal and financial obligations by implementing appropriate governance practices that support our aim to provide high quality child care that meets the objectives and principles of the National Quality Framework, the National Quality Standard and the Early Years Learning Framework.

Related Policies
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
National Quality Framework Policy
Record Keeping and Retention Policy

Implementation

Service Structure
Our service has the following organisational structure.
The Approved Provider is: ETPM PTY LTD ATF
Monahan Family Trust Trading As
Somerville Childcare and Kindergarten

  • The approved provider has a range of responsibilities prescribed in the Education and Care Services National Law and Regulations, including keeping accurate records and retaining them for specified timeframes.

Our approved provider is also responsible for:

  • ensuring the financial viability of the service
  • overseeing control and accountability systems
  • supporting the Nominated Supervisor / responsible person/Certified Supervisors in their role and providing resources as appropriate for the effective running of the service.

Our Nominated Supervisor is: Carol Wright
The Nominated Supervisor is responsible for the day to day management of our service and has a range of responsibilities prescribed in the national law and regulations.
Our Certified Supervisors are: Sherrie Monahan, Tom Monahan, Carol Wright, Gail Moroney, Prue Gallery, Belinda Barrow, Danielle Scott & Jenny McGowan.
Our Educational Leader is: Carol Wright
Our Room Leaders are: Carol Wright, Belinda Barrow, Prue Gallery, Jenny McGowan, Gail Moroney & Danielle Scott.
Commitment to good governance
Our service has adopted the following eight ASX Corporate Governance Principles and Recommendations, which we recognise as suitable for our business (services may wish to amend this section as the ASX Corporate Governance Principles and Recommendations are a guideline only – they are not in the NQS/Regs, etc) -

  • Lay solid foundations for management and oversight.

Management Principles
To ensure our working relationships are characterised by open and respectful communication, accountability and trust our service adheres to the following management principles.

  • Management by Agreement

Nominated Supervisors and educators agree to produce outcomes together. Educators agree on their accountabilities and to work according to existing procedures and policies. Nominated Supervisors agree to provide educators with training, resources and support.

  • Management by Exception

Once a system is in place or the Nominated Supervisor and educators have agreed upon a course of action, the educator is accountable for identifying and reporting whenever something significant occurs that isn't part of the plan.

  • Clearly Defined Reporting Relationships

Everyone in the Service has only one primary manager. This reduces confusion and increase accountability and transparency.

Information, requests, or delegations that would cause our educators/staff to take action or change the course of their actions will only come from the person to whom they report.

Our reporting relationships are:

  • Owners who work in the Service will act according to the reporting relationships applicable to those positions.
  • The Nominated Supervisor reports to the Approved Provider.
  • The Certified Supervisor in day to day charge of the service reports to the Nominated Supervisor.
  • Each Room Leader reports to the Nominated Supervisor.
  • The Nominated Supervisor has the authority to communicate information about the work and to direct the activities of the Room Leader.
  • Educators in the rooms report to the Room Leader
  • Guidelines for Effective Delegation

Our service will:

  • identify the work/result to delegate and to whom

Educators/staff will not delegate responsibilities for which they are accountable or work/results that have been delegated to them with their agreement or work/results attached to someone else's position (unless that person has agreed).

  • put the delegation in writing with a clear due date
  • discuss the delegation with the educator/staff member whenever possible
  • get the educator/staff member's agreement

for example through signed job descriptions, signed delegation agreements.

The person who delegates remains accountable for making sure the right result is achieved.

  • Guidelines for Effective Regulation

Regulating work means monitoring, reviewing, and adjusting it to get the right result.

Our service will:

  • regularly review the work process
  • give quick, clear, and direct feedback and instruction that is timely and specific
  • communicate in writing
  • avoid under-regulating, over-regulating and unnecessary meetings.
  • Structure the board/partnership/association/management team to add value

To comply with these principles to the best of our ability and to ensure we can discuss issues and (potential) changes to policies, procedures or the regulatory environment, we will schedule regular communication between all members of our management team through meetings, phone communication including SMS messaging, a communication book, written communication such as letters, notices, and electronic communication including email, Skype, video conferencing.

  • Promote ethical and responsible decision-making

Our service will make decisions which are consistent with our policies, our obligations and requirements under the national education and care law and regulations, our approved learning framework (EYLF) and the ethical standards in our code of conduct.

  • Safeguard integrity in financial reporting

Our financial records will be completed/reviewed by an independent accountant /auditor.

  • Make timely and balanced disclosure

Unless there is a risk to the health, safety or wellbeing of a child enrolled at the service, our service will provide at least 14 days notice before making any change to a policy/procedure that may have a significant impact on our provision of education and care or a family’s ability to utilise our service, including making any change that will affect the fees charged or the way fees are collected.
Our service will also:

  • advise the regulatory authority of any required notifications including any change to the person designated as the Nominated Supervisor no later than 14 days after the change
  • develop a Quality Improvement Plan that is completed regularly, available on request and ready for submission to the Regulatory Authority when requested.
  • Respect the rights of shareholders, parents, children

Our service will support and encourage the involvement of parents and families by:

  • developing and implementing plans to ensure regular communication with families including advice about events, activities and policy updates
  • enabling them to have access and provide input to reviews of policies and procedures
  • providing space for private consultations
  • providing and displaying a range of information about relevant issues
  • ensuring we follow all policies and procedures including the Parental interaction and Involvement Policy and Privacy and Confidentiality Policy.

Our service will respect the rights of children by ensuring:

  • the Nominated Supervisor complies with their responsibilities under the national law and regulations
  • we follow our policies and procedures including the Relationships with Children Policy, Child Protection Policy and Privacy and Confidentiality Policy.
  • our children are provided with the experiences and learning which allows them to develop their identities, wellbeing and social connection.
  • Recognise and manage risk

Our service will take every reasonable precaution to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury. We will follow service policies including those covering Workplace Health and Safety, Child Protection, Excursions and the Delivery and Collection of Children and complete regular risk assessments and safety checks.

  • Remunerate fairly and responsibly

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Early Years Learning Framework
Corporate Governance Principles and Recommendations ASX Corporate Governance Council

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy

NQS

QA2

2.1

Each child’s health is promoted.

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.3

Effective hygiene practices are promoted and implemented.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.

2.2.1

Healthy eating is promoted and food and drinks provided by the service are nutritious and appropriate for each child.

QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations

Regs

77

Health, hygiene and safe food practices

78

Food and beverages

79

Service providing food and beverages

80

Weekly menu


EYLF

LO3

Actively support children to learn hygiene practices.

Promote continuity of children’s personal health and hygiene by sharing ownership of routines and schedules with children, families and the community.

Discuss health and safety issues with children and involve them in developing guidelines to keep the environment safe for all.

Model and reinforce health, nutrition and personal hygiene practices with children.


Aim
Our service aims to promote and protect the health, safety and wellbeing of all of children, educators and families using procedures and policies to maintain high standards of hygiene and provide safe food to children. We also aim to reduce the risk of infectious diseases and illnesses spreading and following appropriate OHS standards. A holistic and consistent approach to health, hygiene and safe food across the service will help to effectively meet this aim.

Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Enrolment Policy
Food, Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma, Illness Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Physical Activity Promotion Policy
Relationships with Children Policy

Implementation
The Approved Provider will ensure that the Nominated Supervisor (who is responsible for ensuring all staff members, educators and volunteers) must implement adequate health and hygiene practices and safe practices for handling, preparing and storing food. This policy, and related policies and procedures at the service will be followed by nominated supervisors and staff members of, and volunteers at, the service in relation to -
(a) Hygiene practices.
(b) Safe and hygienic storage, handling and preparation of all food and drinks, including foods and drinks provided by the child’s home.
(c) Working with children to support the promotion of hygiene practices, including hand washing, coughing, dental hygiene and ear care.
(d) Toileting, nappy changing and cleaning of equipment.
(e) The provision of fresh linen and sheeting for cots and mattresses.
Children will be grouped in a way that allows educators to maintain a hygienic environment for individual at the service.
In any instances where children display any signs of illness or injury, educators will refer to the Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy and Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Record.
Importantly, we will work with each child to promote health and safety issues, encourage effective hygiene, food safety and dental care, and maintain a healthy environment that is safe for each child. Regular discussions between educators and children will be integrated throughout the program at appropriate intervals.
Information on health, hygiene, safe food and dental care principles and practices will be displayed in the reception area and drawn to the attention of all parents on a regular basis.
To uphold the general health and safety of all children using the service, all educators and visitors will follow the Tobacco, Drug and Alcohol Policy.
Equipment and Environment
The service will wash mouthed toys daily using warms water and soap, and dry in the sun, rotate toys to allow for washing and use individual toy bags for babies, clean books by wiping with moist cloth and drying, clean storage areas weekly.
Surfaces will be cleaned with detergent after each activity and all surfaces cleaned thoroughly daily. Floor in the babies and toddlers rooms will be washed each day. Areas contaminated with body fluids will be disinfected after washing.
Sterilisation of Dummies/Pacifiers
Where a baby does not have a clean spare dummy educators will sterilise a dirty dummy before use by simmering it in boiling water for at least 5 minutes. Dummies will not be sterilised using a microwave. Educators will ensure the dummy is cool before use. T he dummy will be air-dried and stored in a sealed container if it is not being used immediately. Educators will advise parents to discard the dummy if the baby has an infection. For children over 12 months old dummies can be cleaned by washing with warm, soapy water and rinsing well.
Sterilisation of Bottles
Educators will sterilise all bottle-feeding equipment for babies up to 12 months old. The bottles, teats etc. will be washed in warm, soapy water using a clean bottlebrush to thoroughly remove all traces of milk. The bottles will be rinsed and then sterilised by one of the following methods (boiling is the preferred option recommended by the Vic Govt Better Health).
Boiling
Educators will

  • Place all equipment in a large pot and cover with tap water (make sure your water meets the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines if you are not using town water).
  • Make sure there are no air bubbles trapped inside the bottles.
  • Put the saucepan lid on and bring to the boil.
  • Allow five minutes of rapid boiling.
  • Turn off heat and allow to cool.
  • Make sure they wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water before handling the equipment.
  • Store the sterilised equipment in a clean container in the fridge and re-boil after 24 hours if it has not been used before then.

Sterilising chemicals
Educators will carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions to ensure correct strength and:

  • Mix the chemicals with water in a big plastic or glass bowl
  • Place all equipment in the solution ensuring all surfaces are covered– for example, by squirting solution through teats and getting rid of any air bubbles.
  • Soak the equipment for at least one hour and change the solution every 24 hours.
  • Scrub the container with warm soapy water and rinse thoroughly before refilling with new solution.
  • Remove the equipment and shake off excess solution, but do not rinse.
  • Use only glass or plastic, as metal will rust when left in the solution.


Steam steriliser appliances
Educators will use a steam steriliser appliance to the manufacturer’s directions and:

  • Place the equipment in the steriliser and add the recommended amount of water.
  • Put the lid on and steam the equipment for the recommended period of time.
  • Keep the lid on until the bottles are needed.
  • Wipe and dry the inside of the container once a day to keep it clean.

Microwave steam sterilisers


Educators will:

  • Read the instructions carefully.
  • Check the microwave power needed to sterilise the equipment properly because not all microwave ovens are the same.
  • Do not use metal inside these sterilisers.

Bedding
Each child will have their own bedding which will be supplied by the family. When used by one child it will be washed before it is used by another child.

HIV AIDS Policy

NQS

QA2

2.1

Each child’s health is promoted.

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.3

Effective hygiene practices are promoted and implemented.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.

 

National Regulations

Regs

77

Health, hygiene and safe food practices

88

Infectious diseases

90

Medical conditions policy

Aim
The service aims to effectively care for any child that may be infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, AIDS Virus and also minimise the risk of exposure to HIV through effective hygiene practices.

Related Policies
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy


Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Staff
Families
Community
Visitors
Management

 

Implementation
It is the Nominated Supervisor’s responsibility to educate and inform staff and parents about HIV/AIDS. One of the main problems surrounding HIV/AIDS is a lack of understanding which leads to an unfounded fear to the virus.
The following provides basic information on HIV/AIDS -

  • AIDS is a medical condition which can damage a bodies’ immune system.
  • It is caused by a virus which is transmitted through the exchange of bodily fluid and is primarily passed on through sexual contact.
  • The AIDS virus can be transmitted through blood products. However, the risk of contracting AIDS from a blood transfusion is minimal and said to be about one in 1,000,000.
  • There is no evidence of the spread of the virus to children through other means at this time.

The confidentiality of medical information must be adhered to regarding an infected child. Any information disclosed to the Nominated Supervisor regarding a child from family members must not be passed on to any other staff member unless the child’s caregivers provide written authorisation.
Children with the HIV virus will be accepted into the service.
Educators will carry out routine hygiene precautions to Australian standards at all times to prevent the spread of any infections following the service’s relevant policies and procedures.
Educators will exercise care in regards to the exposure of bodily fluids and blood and the service’s hygiene practices will be used to prevent the spread of infection. Similarly, if the need arises to perform CPR on a child infected with HIV a disposable mouth to mouth mask will be used.
Children who are infected with HIV will be assessed by their Doctor before they are excluded from the service. Children who have abrasions or open wounds will cover them while at the service. If these abrasions cannot be covered for any reason unfortunately the child will have to be excluded from the service until the wound has healed or can be covered.
Educators who have been infected by HIV are not obliged to inform their employer but are expected to act in a safe and responsible manner at all times to minimise the risk of infection.
No child, educator, parent or other visitor to the service will be denied First Aid at any time.


Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Early Years Learning Framework
National Quality Standard
Public Health (Amendment) Act 1991
Anti Discrimination Act 1997
National Health and Medical Research Council. (2005). Staying Healthy in Child Care – Preventing infectious diseases in child care

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties.

Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy

To be read with -
Infectious Diseases Policy

NQS

QA2

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.


National Regulations

Reg

77

Health, hygiene and safe food practices

88

Infectious diseases

90

Medical conditions policy

162

Health information to be kept in enrolment record


Aim

Immunisation is a simple, safe and effective way of protecting individuals against harmful diseases before they come into contact with them in the community. Immunisation not only protects individuals, but also others in the community, by reducing the spread of disease.
Related Policies
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy


Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Parents
Family
Educator
Management
Visitors
Volunteers

Implementation
The Australian Government Department of Health and Aging Immunise Australia Program –
1800 671 811 or www.immunise.health.gov.au/

Department of Health, Victoria
Immunisation Program
http://www.health.vic.gov.au/immunisation/
Telephone - 1300 882 008

Immunisation Records

  • Parents who wish to enrol their child are required to provide evidence of their child’s immunisation record.
  • Parents are required to present the child’s immunisation record at the time of enrolment.
  • This information allows children at risk of catching a vaccine preventable disease to be identified if there is a case of that disease at the service.
  • Acceptable immunisation records are –
    • An immunisation record is a written record of the immunisations that your child has received and the date that they received them.
    • An Immunisation History Statement provided by the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) is a valid immunisation record.
    • The original immunisation record must be completed and signed by a medical practitioner, a registered nurse, a registered midwife, an enrolled nurse, or an individual authorised by the state/territory Health department.
  • The Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) maintains immunisation records for children up until their seventh birthday. You can obtain an ACIR Immunisation History Statement for your child by calling 1800 653 809.
  • The original immunisation record is usually kept in the personal health record book. These books are usually given to parents at the time of their child’s birth.
  • Each child’s Immunisation Record should stay intact until your child reaches primary school. Do not remove any of the duplicate pages until this time.
  • Parents need to provide the childcare service or preschool with a photocopy of their child’s original immunisation record. Alternatively, parents may provide an Immunisation History Statement provided by the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR).
  • The service must be able to quickly access immunisation records and determine who has not been immunised. If there is a case of a vaccine preventable disease, and your child has not been fully immunised for that disease, they may be excluded from school or childcare for a period of time.

Catering for Children with Overseas Immunisation Records

  • Overseas immunisation schedules often differ from the schedule recommended in Australia and a child may require extra vaccinations to be up to date with the Australian schedule.
  • Parents are responsible for having their child’s overseas immunisation record transcribed onto the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR), if your child is less than seven years of age.
  • A medical practitioner, registered nurse, registered midwife, enrolled nurse, or an individual authorised by the state/territory Health Officer may transcribe overseas immunisation records.

Exclusion Periods

  • Whilst the service actively encourages each child, educator and family member using the service to be immunised, we recognise that immunisation is not compulsory.
  • If a child’s immunisation record is not provided upon enrolment and if it is not updated by the parents, or if the child has not been immunised against certain diseases, then the child will be recorded as being not fully immunised by the service.
  • If there is a case of a vaccine preventable disease at the service, your child may be excluded from school or childcare for a period of time or until the evidence of immunisation in an approved record is provided.
  • If you cannot provide an immunisation record for your child you may provide a statutory declaration stating either that your child has been immunised or that you don’t know if your child has been immunised for each disease on the schedule.
  • To be fully immunised your child needs to have received all vaccines recommended for their age as part of the National Immunisation Program (NIP).
  • Homeopathic immunisation is not recognised.
  • If a child is not fully immunised and has been in contact with someone with a vaccine preventable disease outside of the service, they may need to be excluded from the service for a period of time.
  • It is the responsibility of families to inform the service that their child has come into contact with someone with a vaccine preventable or infectious disease.

Immunisation for Educators

  • It is important that educators remain up to date with their vaccinations in order to protect themselves as well as children in their care. The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) recommends that individuals who work with children, including child care and pre-school staff (including child care students) and outside school hours carers, should be vaccinated against pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis A, measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), varicella (chickenpox), and influenza (required annually).
  • The service will take all reasonable steps to strongly encourage non-immune workers to be vaccinated.
  • Occupational recommendations apply for the immunisation of educators at the service. As there are no mandatory requirements under the law for educators to be immunised, the service must follow the following requirements that our service has developed:
    • The Exclusion Periods requirements above apply to all educators.
    • Educators who are not immunised will be excluded from the service until the Nominated Supervisor or Owner provides instructions for the educator to return to education and care duties at the service.

OR

    • Educators who are not immunised may use their best judgement to decide whether they exclude themselves from the service during an outbreak of an infectious disease.

 

Immunisation Related Payments for Parents - Child Care Benefit
The benefit applies to children who are fully immunised or have an approved exemption from immunisation. This initiative ensures parents are reminded of the importance of immunising their children at each of the milestones. For parents to receive benefits without their child being fully immunised your healthcare provider needs to certify that:

  • your child has a medical reason not to have a particular vaccination; or
  • your child has had a disease and has a natural immunity; or
  • a particular vaccine is unavailable.
  • Information on how a child’s immunisation status affects payments made to a family, and more information on exemptions is available on the following website -

http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/public/services/acir/family-assist.jsp#N10059

  • Parents are responsible for payment of fees while their child is excluded under all circumstances.

Current Immunisation Schedule
The National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule
If you have any further questions about the National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule, please talk to your doctor or immunisation provider.

Birth


2 months

  • Hepatitis B (hepB) [See footnote b]
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (acellular pertussis) (DTPa)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) [See footnotes c & d]
  • Polio (inactivated poliomyelitis IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (7vPCV)
  • Rotavirus


4 months

  • Hepatitis B (hepB) [See footnote b]
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (acellular pertussis (DTPa)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) [See footnotes c & d]
  • Polio (inactivated poliomyelitis IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (7vPCV)
  • Rotavirus


6 months

  • Hepatitis B (hepB) [See footnote b]
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (acellular pertussis (DTPa)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) [See footnote c]
  • Polio (inactivated poliomyelitis) (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (7vPCV) [See footnote e]
  • Rotavirus [See footnote j]


12 months

  • Hepatitis B (hepB) [See footnote b]
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) [See footnote d]
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
  • Meningococcal C (MenCCV)


12-24 months

  • Hepatitis A (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in high risk areas) [See footnote f]


18 months

  • Chickenpox (varicella) (VZV)


18-24 months

  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV) (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in high risk areas) [See footnote g]
  • Hepatitis A (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in high risk areas)


4 years

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (acellular pertussis) (DTPa)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
  • Polio (inactivated poliomyelitis) (IPV)


10-13 years

12-13 years


15-17 years

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (acellular pertussis) (dTPa) [See footnote i]


15-49 years

  • Influenza (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people medically at-risk)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV) (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people medically at-risk)


50 years and over

  • Influenza (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV) (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people)


65 years and over

  • Influenza (flu)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV)


Footnotes to the National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule

a. Hepatitis B vaccine should be given to all infants as soon as practicable after birth. The greatest benefit is if given within 24 hours, and must be given within 7 days.

b. Total of three doses of hepB required following the birth dose, at either 2m, 4m and 6m or at 2m, 4m and 12m.

c. Give a total of 4 doses of Hib vaccine (2m, 4m, 6m and 12m) if using PRP-T Hib containing vaccines.

d. Use PRP-OMP Hib containing vaccines in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in areas of higher risk (Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia) with a dose at 2m, 4m and 12m.

e. Medical at-risk children require a fourth dose of 7vPCV at 12 months of age, and a booster dose of 23vPPV at 4 years of age.

f. Two doses of hepatitis A vaccine are required for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in areas of higher risk (Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia). Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.

g. Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.

h. These vaccines are for one cohort only within this age range, and should only be given if there is no prior history of disease or vaccination. Dose schedules may vary between jurisdictions. Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.

i. This vaccine is for one cohort only within this age range. Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.

j. Third dose of vaccine is dependent on vaccine brand used. Contact your State or Territory Health department for details.

k. Also for 12 to 18 year old girls who are not at school (community based catch-up program) and for 18 to 26 year old women until 30 June 2009. Females in these age groups must have started the course with their first dose of the vaccine on or before 30 June 2009, and complete all 3 doses by 31 December 2009.


Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Department of Health and Aging, National Immunisation Program Schedule

NHMRC. Staying Healthy in Child Care Preventing infectious diseases in child care 4th edition
Medicare Australia - http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/provider/patients/acir/schedule.jsp
Public Health Regulations 2000

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually. The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.



National Regulations

Regs

12

Meaning of serious incident

85

Incident, injury, trauma and illness policies and procedures

86

Notification to parents of incident, injury, trauma and illness

87

Incident, injury, trauma and illness record

88

Infectious diseases

89

First aid kits

97

Emergency and evacuation procedures

161

Authorisations to be kept in enrolment record

162

Health information to be kept in enrolment record

168

Education and care service must have policies and procedures

174

Prescribed information to be notified to Regulatory Authority

176

Time to notify certain information to Regulatory Authority

Aim
The service and all educators can effectively respond to and manage accidents, illness and emergencies which occur at the service to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children, educators and visitors.
Related Policies
Death of a Child Policy
Emergency Service Contact Policy
Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy

Implementation
This policy and related policies and procedures at the service will be followed by nominated supervisors and educators of, and volunteers at, the service in the event that a child -
(a) is injured; or
(b) becomes ill; or
(c) suffers a trauma.
The approved provider of the service will ensure that a parent of a child is notified as soon as practicably possible and without undue delay. Parents will be notified no later than 24 hours of the injury, illness or trauma. An Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Record will be completed without delay.

First aid kits will be easily recognised and readily available where children are present at the service and during excursions. They will be suitably equipped having regard to the hazards at the service, past and potential injuries and size and location of the service.
We will ensure first aid, anaphylaxis management training and asthma management training is current and updated at least every 3 years, and that all components of the first aid certificate are current if some require an earlier revision.
We will display these qualifications and expiry date where they can be easily be viewed by all educators and staff, together with a photograph of the first aid trained educators and their contact details to assist in the identification process.
First aid qualified educators will be present at all times on the roster and in the service. They will never exceed their qualifications and competence when administering first aid.
During induction training for new educators and staff we will:

  • advise which educators have first aid qualifications, and asthma and anaphylaxis management training and the location of the first aid kit
  • obtain information about any first aid needs the educator may have that could require specific treatment in a medical emergency. This information will only be provided to first aid qualified educators with the employee’s consent.

We will review our first aid response plan, the location of the first aid kit and who our first aid trained educators are at least annually or when there are any changes during staff meetings or through newsletters, emails or memos.

 

 

Administration of First Aid
If there is an accident, illness or injury requiring first aid, the following response procedure will be implemented:

  • Educator or staff member notifies nominated supervisor and a first aid qualified educator of the incident, illness or injury
  • Nominated supervisor or first aid qualified educator reviews child’s medical information including any medical information disclosed on the child’s enrolment form, medical management plan or medical risk minimisation plan before the first aid qualified educator attends to the injured or ill child or adult.

If the illness or incident involves asthma or anaphylaxis, an educator with approved asthma or anaphylaxis training will attend to the child or adult (commencing 1 January 2013 for services that immediately prior to 1 January 2012 did not require educators to have asthma management training or anaphylaxis management training).

  • Nominated supervisor and educators supervise and care for children in the vicinity of the incident, illness or injury
  • If required, first aid qualified educator or nominated supervisor notifies and co-ordinates ambulance
  • If required, first aid qualified educator or nominated supervisor notifies parent or authorised nominee that child requires medical attention from a medical practitioner
  • If required, educator or nominated supervisor contacts parent or authorised nominee to collect child from service
  • Nominated supervisor ensures Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Record is completed in full and without delay and parent or authorised nominee is notified as soon as possible and within 24 hours of the injury, illness or trauma.

First Aid Kit Guidelines
Any First Aid kit at the service must -

  • Not be locked.
  • Not contain paracetamol.
  • Be appropriate for the number of employees and children and adequate for the immediate treatment of injuries at the service.
  • Be in a place that takes an employee no longer than two minutes to reach, including time required to access secure areas.
  • Be constructed of resistant material, be dustproof and of sufficient size to adequately store the required contents
  • Be capable of being sealed and preferably be fitted with a carrying handle as well as have internal compartments.
  • Contain a list of the contents of the kit.
  • Be regularly checked using the First Aid Kit Checklist to ensure the contents are as listed and have not deteriorated or expired.
  • Have a white cross on a green background with the words 'First Aid' prominently displayed on the outside.
  • Be easy to access and if applicable, located where there is a risk of injury occurring.
  • Display emergency telephone numbers, the phone number and location of the nearest first aid trained educators (including appropriate information for those employees who have mobile workplaces).
  • Display a photograph of the first aid trained educators along with contact details to assist in the identification process.
  • Be provided on each floor of a multi-level workplace.
  • Be provided in each work vehicle.
  • Consideration should be given to preventative measures such as sunscreen protection and portable water if working outdoors.
  • First Aid kits must be taken on excursions and be attended by First Aid qualified educators.
  • Be maintained in proper condition and the contents replenished as necessary.
  • Our First Aid delegated individual responsible for maintaining all First Aid kits at the service is:

Name Carol Wright Role Manager
Number of First Aid Kits Responsible For In the Service
3

  • Our back-up First Aid delegated individual responsible for maintaining all First Aid kits when the person listed above is away is:

Name Gail Moroney Role Toddler Purple Room
Number of First Aid Kits Responsible For In the Service
3
These individuals are responsible for using the First Aid Checklist and ensuring each Kit has the required quantities, items are within their expiry dates and sterile products are sealed. This will occur after each use or if unused, at least annually. They will also consider whether the first aid kits and modules suit the service’s hazards and the injuries that have occurred. If the kit requires additional resources, these individuals will advise and follow up with the nominated supervisor.


First Aid Kit Checklist
Our service will determine the appropriate quantity after considering the number of children in care.
Our educators will also ensure they are equipped with the appropriate resources to deal with a child at risk of anaphylaxis and other medical conditions. Educators may wish to provide additional items or modules, for example burns modules and eye wound modules.


Product Name


Qty

QUANITY AND
EXPIRY DATE MET
Yes / No

basic first aid notes

 

disposable gloves

 

resuscitation mask

 

individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings

 

sterile eye pads (packet)

 

Sterile coverings for serious wounds

 

triangular bandages

 

safety pins

 

small sterile unmedicated wound dressings

 

medium sterile unmedicated wound dressings

 

large sterile unmedicated wound dressings

 

non-allergenic tape

 

rubber thread or crepe bandage

 

scissors

 

tweezers

 

suitable book for recording details of first aid provided

 

sterile saline solution

 

plastic bags for disposal.

 

basic first aid notes

 

disposable gloves

 

resuscitation mask

 

individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings

 

sterile eye pads (packet)

 

sterile coverings for serious wounds

 

triangular bandages

 

safety pins

 

small sterile unmedicated wound dressings

 

medium sterile unmedicated wound dressings

 

large sterile unmedicated wound dressings

 

non-allergenic tape

 

rubber thread or crepe bandage

 

scissors

 

tweezers

 

suitable book for recording details of first aid provided

 

sterile saline solution

 

plastic bags for disposal.

 

basic first aid notes

 

disposable gloves

 

resuscitation mask

 

individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings

 

sterile eye pads (packet)

 

sterile coverings for serious wounds

 

triangular bandages

 


Given Name:

Surname:

Date Of Birth:

Age:

Room:

Time:

Date:

Location:

Circumstances leading to the incident/illness/trauma:

Products or structures involved:

Name of witness:

Signature:

Date:

Nature of injury sustained:

Description: http://ts2.mm.bing.net/th?id=I4538041645467021&pid=1.1

Abrasion/scrape

Cut

Bite

Rash

Bruise

Sprain

Burn

Swelling

Concussion

Other (specify)

Illness- Circumstances surrounding child becoming ill, including apparent symptoms:

Time of Illness:

Date of Illness

Action Taken: Details of action taken, including first aid administered & medication:

Medical personal contacted: YES NO

Details:

Person completing record:

Time:

Date:

Name:

Signature:

Parent/ guardian notification:

Date:

I ____________________________________________, have been notified of my child’s incident / trauma / illness. (please circle).

Parent/ Guardian

Time:

Date:

Staff notifying

Time:

Date:

Regulatory authority (if applicable)

Time:

Date:

Notification of serious incidents and complaints
The Approved Provider will notify the regulatory authority within 24 hours of any serious incident at our service (s. 174). This includes an injury or trauma to, or illness of a child for which the attention of a medical practitioner was sought or ought reasonably to have been sought or the child attended, or ought reasonably to have attended a hospital.
If the attention of a medical practitioner was sought or the child attended hospital in connection with the injury, trauma or illness the incident is a ‘serious one’ and must be notified.
To decide if an injury, trauma or illness is a ‘serious incident’ when the child did not attend a medical practitioner or hospital, we will consider the following issues:

  • Was more than basic first aid needed to manage the injury, trauma or illness?
  • Should medical attention have been sought for the child?
  • Should the child have attended a hospital or an equivalent facility?

Serious incidents include:

  • head injuries
  • fractures
  • burns
  • removal of fingers
  • meningococcal infection
  • anaphylactic reaction requiring hospitalisation
  • witnessing violence or a frightening event
  • epileptic seizures
  • bronchiolitis
  • whooping cough
  • measles
  • diarrhoea requiring hospitalisation
  • asthma requiring hospitalisation
  • sexual assault

A serious incident also includes:

  • The death of a child
  • An incident at the service where the emergency services attended or should have attended
  • A child is missing
  • A child has been taken from the service without the authorisations required under the regulations
  • A child is mistakenly locked in or out of the service.

If our service only becomes aware that the incident was serious afterwards, we will notify the regulatory authority within 24 hours of becoming aware that the incident was serious.
We will notify the regulator using form SI01 Notification of Serious Incident .
The Approved Provider will also notify the regulatory authority in writing:

  • within 24 hours of any complaints alleging that the safety, health or wellbeing of a child is being compromised at the service or
  • within 7 days of any circumstances arising at the Service that pose a risk to the health, safety and wellbeing of a child.

Work Health and Safety (OHS) requirements

Under the new laws serious injury or illness is a “notifiable incident”. Serious injury or illness means a person requires:

  • immediate treatment as an in-patient in a hospital, or
  • immediate treatment for:
    • the amputation of any part of the body
    • a serious head injury
    • a serious eye injury
    • a serious burn
    • the separation of skin from an underlying tissue (such as degloving or scalping)
    • a spinal injury
    • the loss of a bodily function
    • serious lacerations or
  • medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance.

A serious illness includes any infection to which the carrying out of work is a significant contributing factor, for example an infection that can be linked to providing treatment to a person or coming into contact with human blood or body substances.

A dangerous incident is also notifiable under the legislation. Dangerous incidents include:

  • an uncontrolled escape, spillage or leakage of a substance
  • an uncontrolled implosion, explosion or fire
  • an uncontrolled escape of gas or steam
  • an uncontrolled escape of a pressurised substance
  • electric shock
  • the fall or release from a height of any plant, substance or thing
  • the collapse, overturning, failure or malfunction of, or damage to, any plant that is required to be authorised for use in accordance with the regulations
  • the collapse or partial collapse of a structure
  • the collapse or failure of an excavation or of any shoring supporting an excavation
  • the inrush of water, mud or gas in workings, in an underground excavation or tunnel

The approved provider or nominated supervisor must notify WorkCover by telephone or in writing (including by facsimile or email) as soon as possible after the injury, illness or incident. Records of the incident must be kept for at least 5 years from the date that the incident is notified. The approved provider/nominated supervisor must ensure the site where the incident occurred is left undisturbed as much as possible until an inspector arrives or as directed by WorkCover.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 2007
Safe Work Australia Legislative Fact Sheets First Aiders
Safe Work Australia First Aid in the Workplace Draft Code of Practice (Draft)
Work Health and Safety Act

 

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Infectious Diseases Policy

To be read with -
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
NQS

QA2

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.



National Regulations

Regs

77

Health, hygiene and safe food practices

85

Incident, injury, trauma and illness policies and procedures

86

Notification to parents of incident, injury, trauma and illness

87

Incident, injury, trauma and illness record

88

Infectious diseases

90

Medical conditions policy

162

Health information to be kept in enrolment record

Aim
Immunisation is a simple, safe and effective way of protecting individuals against harmful diseases before they come into contact with them in the community. Immunisation not only protects individuals, but also others in the community, by reducing the spread of disease.

Related Policies
Educator and Management Policy
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Immunisation Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Parents
Family
Educators
Management
Visitors
Volunteers

Implementation

  • The service will use the attached Recommended Minimum Periods of Exclusion to exclude children and educators and inform parents of exclusion and non-exclusion periods for infectious diseases. We will minimise the spread of potential infectious diseases between children, other children and educators by excluding children who may have an infectious disease or are too ill to attend the service and facilitating the prevention and effective management of acute illness in children.
  • Notification of the child’s parents or nominated contacts will occur immediately.
  • All appropriate notifications to the local Public Health Unit are available under the ‘Infectious Diseases requiring Notification to the local Public Health Unit and must occur within 24 hours. The Nominated Supervisor is responsible for notifying the local Public Health Unit.
  • Children might be brought to care with symptoms or signs of illness or while in care suddenly develop an illness that has not been diagnosed by a doctor, and that might be potentially infectious or potentially life-threatening for the child. Symptoms may not clearly fit those listed in exclusion diseases making it difficult for the service to decide whether to accept or exclude the child from the service. Many illnesses, while not fitting exclusion criteria, can transmit disease to other children in care, and many non-exclusion diseases can make a child too ill to participate in normal care activities.

If an infectious disease arises at the service we will respond to any symptoms in the following manner -

  • Isolate the child from other children.
  • Ensure the child is comfortable and appropriately supervised by educators.
  • Contact the child’s parents or nominated emergency contact. If the child’s parents are unavailable we will contact the next nominated individual. We will inform the contact of the child’s condition and ask for a parent or other authorised individual to pick the child up as quickly as possible. Any individual picking the child up from the service must be approved by the child’s parents and be able to show identification.
  • Ensure all bedding, towels and clothing which has been used by the child is disinfected. These items will be washed separately and if possible air dried in the sun.
  • Ensure all toys used by the child are disinfected.
  • Ensure all eating utensils used by the child are separated and sterilised.
  • Provide information in the child’s home languages to the best of our ability.
  • Inform all service families and educators of the presence of an infectious disease.
  • Ensure confidentiality of any personal health related information obtained by the service and educators in relation to any child or their family.
  • If a child or educator has been unable to attend the Service because of an infectious illness the individual must provide a doctors certificate which specifically states the child/staff member is ok to return to the Service.

Notifications and exclusion periods
As outlined in the Public Health and Wellbeing Regulations 2009 (Vic):

  • parents must advise family day care educators as soon as possible if a child has an infectious diseases or the child has been in contact with a person infected with an infectious disease. These diseases and the minimum periods of exclusion are listed in Schedule 7 and can be accessed on-line at www.legislation.vic.gov.au
  • family day care educators must inform the parents and the Secretary of the Department of Health within 24 hours of forming the belief that a child is suffering from pertussis, poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella or meningoccol C.
  • Family day care educators and family day care co-ordinators must not allow a child who has been infected or had contact with the diseases outlined in Schedule 7 to the Regulations to attend the service for the exclusion periods outlined in Schedule 7.

The diseases and exclusion periods outlined in the Schedule to the Public Health and Wellbeing Regulations 2009 are similar to the National Guidelines detailed below under “Recommended Periods of Exclusion”.

Infectious Diseases requiring Notification to the local Public Health Unit
Infectious Diseases only require notification from doctors and laboratories. A list of diseases can be found on following form –
http://docs.health.vic.gov.au/.../notifiable_conditions_form.pdf

 

Immunisation and Educators
The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) recommend that educators should be immunised against -

  • Hepatitis A.
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR).

Educators born during or since 1966 who do not have vaccination records of two doses of MMR, or do not have antibodies for rubella, require vaccination.

  • Varicella if they have not previously been infected with chickenpox.
  • Pertussis. An adult booster dose is especially important for those educators caring for the youngest children who are not fully vaccinated.
  • Hepatitis B if caring for unimmunised children with intellectual disabilities (although the risk is low).

Our service will:

  • regularly provide educators and staff with information about diseases that can be prevented by immunisation through in-service training sessions, fact sheets and the Staying Healthy in Childcare publication.
  • regularly advise educators and staff that some infectious diseases may injure an unborn child if the mother is infected while pregnant through in-service training sessions, fact sheets and the Staying Healthy in Childcare publication. These infections include chickenpox, cytomegalovirus and rubella (German measles) .
  • ask new employees to confirm in writing that we have provided this information during their induction.
  • encourage all non-immune staff to be vaccinated.
  • advise female educators / staff who are not fully immunised to consider doing so before getting pregnant.
  • advise pregnant educators and staff to review the Staying Healthy in Childcare publication and consult their medical practitioner to consider the risks of continuing to work at the service.
  • ensure pregnant educators and staff follow good infection control and hygiene procedures.
  • consider restricting pregnant educators and staff to working only with toilet trained children.

 

 

Recommended Minimum Periods of Exclusion
National Health and Medical Research Council.
Staying Healthy in Child Care. 4th edition, Commonwealth of Australia 2005.

Children who are unwell should not attend the service.
Definition of ‘Contacts’ will vary according to disease. Please refer to specific Fact Sheets for definition of ‘Contacts’.
Amoebiasis (Entamoeba histolytica)
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Campylobacter
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.

Candidiasis (See ‘Thrush’)

Chickenpox (Varicella)
Exclude until all blisters have dried. This is usually at least 5 days after the rash first appeared in unimmunised children and less in immunised children. Any child with an immune deficiency (for example, leukaemia) or receiving chemotherapy should be excluded for their own protection. Otherwise, not excluded.
CMV (Cytomegalovirus infection)
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Cryptosporidium infection
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts – Not excluded.
Diarrhoea (No organism identified)
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Diphtheria
Exclude until medical certificate of recovery is received following at least 2 negative throat swabs, the first swab not less than 24 hours after finishing a course of antibiotics followed by another swab 48 hours later.
Exclude contacts that live in the same house until cleared to return by an appropriate health authority.

German measles (See ‘Rubella’)

Giardiasis
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Glandular fever (Mononucleosis, EBV infection)
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Hand, foot and mouth disease
Exclude until all blisters have dried.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib)
Exclude until the individual has received appropriate antibiotic treatment for at least 4 days. Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Head lice (Pediculosis)
Exclusion is NOT necessary if effective treatment is commenced prior to the next day at child care (i.e. the child doesn’t need to be sent home immediately if head lice are detected).
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Hepatitis A
Exclude until a medical certificate of recovery is received, but not before seven days after the onset of jaundice.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Hepatitis B
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Hepatitis C
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Herpes simplex (cold sores, fever blisters)
Exclusion is not necessary if the individual is developmentally capable of maintaining hygiene practices to minimise the risk of transmission.
If the individual is unable to comply with these practices they should be excluded until the sores are dry. Sores should be covered by a dressing where possible.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV/AIDS)
Exclusion is NOT necessary. If the individual is severely immunocompromised, they will be vulnerable to other individual’s illnesses.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Hydatid disease
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Impetigo (school sores)
Exclude until appropriate antibiotic treatment has commenced. Any sores on exposed skin should be covered with a watertight dressing.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Influenza and influenza-like illnesses
Exclude until well.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Legionnaires’ disease
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Leprosy
Exclude until approval to return has been given by an appropriate health authority.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.


Measles
Exclude for 4 days after the onset of the rash.
Immunised and immune contacts are not excluded. Non-immunised contacts of a case are to be excluded from child care until 14 days after the first day of appearance of rash in the last case, unless immunised within 72 hours of first contact during the infectious period with the first case.
All immunocompromised children should be excluded until 14 days after the first day of appearance of rash in the last case.
Meningitis (bacterial)
Exclude until well and has received appropriate antibiotics.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Meningitis (viral)
Exclude until well.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Meningococcal infection
Exclude until appropriate antibiotic treatment has been completed.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Molluscum contagiosum
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Mumps
Exclude for nine days or until swelling goes down (whichever is sooner).
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Norovirus
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion or vomiting for 48 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum, slapped cheek syndrome).
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.

Pertussis (See ‘Whooping Cough’)

Respiratory Syncytial virus
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Ringworm/tinea
Exclude until the day after appropriate antifungal treatment has commenced.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Roseola
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Ross River virus
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Rotavirus infection
Children are to be excluded from the service until there has not been a loose bowel motion or vomiting for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Rubella (German measles)
Exclude until fully recovered or for at least four days after the onset of the rash.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Salmonella infection
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Scabies
Exclude until the day after appropriate treatment has commenced.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.

Scarlet fever (See ‘Streptococcal sore throat’)
School sores (See ‘Impetigo’)


 

Shigella infection
Exclude until there has not been a loose bowel motion for 24 hours
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Streptococcal sore throat (including scarlet fever)
Exclude until the individual has received antibiotic treatment for at least 24 hours and feels well.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Thrush (candidiasis)
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Toxoplasmosis
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Tuberculosis (TB)
Exclude until medical certificate is produced from an appropriate health authority.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Typhoid, Paratyphoid
Exclude until medical certificate is produced from appropriate health authority
Contacts - Not excluded unless considered necessary by public health authorities.

Varicella See ‘Chickenpox’

Viral gastroenteritis (viral diarrhoea)
Children are to be excluded until there has not been a loose bowel motion or vomiting for 24 hours.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.
Warts
Exclusion is NOT necessary.
Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.


Whooping cough (pertussis)
Exclude until five days after starting appropriate antibiotic treatment or for 21 days from the onset of coughing. Contacts that live in the same house as the case and have received less than three doses of pertussis vaccine are to be excluded from the service until they have had 5 days of an appropriate course of antibiotics. If antibiotics have not been taken, these contacts must be excluded for 21 days after their last exposure to the case while the individual was infectious.
Worms
Exclude if loose bowel motions present. Exclusion of Contacts - Not excluded.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Department of Health and Aging, National Immunisation Program Schedule

NHMRC. Staying Healthy in Child Care Preventing infectious diseases in child care 4th edition
Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008
Public Health and Wellbeing Regulations 2009

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually. The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Lockdown Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.3

Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

National Regulations

Reg

168(2)(e)

Policies and procedures in relation to emergency and evacuation

97

Emergency and evacuation procedures

98

Telephone or other communication equipment

Aim
The Lockdown Policy aims to ensure the safety of all children, educators, families and other visitors to the service in the event of a threat. Also, the service aims to minimise the risk of harm or the exposure to danger to anyone on the premises through the implementation of this procedure.

Related Policies
Death of a Child Policy
Bushfire Policy
Child Protection Policy
Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy

Implementation
Examples of such critical incidents are:

  • Death of a child at the service or on an excursion.
  • Children/educators being taken hostage.
  • A siege of service property.
  • A disaster in the local community.
  • Unusual amounts of media attention.
  • Aggressive trespassers.

 

Initial Notification
If an event takes place that requires a "Lock Down", the following should occur:

  • The educator who witnesses the event or issue must try to raise an alarm with the most senior individual in charge.
  • 000 must be called immediately if the event or issue requires the police, ambulance or fire service to respond.
  • The most senior individual in charge will determine the need for a "Lock Down" and raise the appropriate alarm.

Alarm Procedure

  • The service bell will sound every 5 seconds for a one minute period.
  • The most senior individual in charge will sound the bell and make the following announcement
  • “This is a LOCK DOWN”
  • “This is not a fire drill”
  • “Everyone is to stay in the room, remain seated and to keep calm and quiet.”

 

Movement of Children and Staff

  • All individuals will remain in their rooms.
  • If possible, educators will make efforts to seal and lock classroom doors and windows.
  • Children should remain under the desks or down low and out of sight during the lockdown period.
  • If children are outside, educators should get them inside as quickly as possible even if they are not from their room.

Staff Responsibilities:

  • Individual in charge to contact Emergency Services and follow their instructions.
  • Educators not involved in the lockdown or without children to supervise are to go to the front of the service to liaise with Emergency Services if it is safe to do so.
  • Educators must check the sign-in sheet and check all signed-in children are present. Any absences must be reported to the Nominated Supervisor as soon as it is safe.
  • Educators are to close and lock all doors and windows, turn the lights off and ensure children are kept below the window level.
  • All staff, children and anyone else present will remain in the locked room until the “All Clear Signal” is given by the individual in charge.

All Clear Signal

The All Clear Signal is as follows:

  • The most senior individual in charge will sound the service’s bell (if applicable) or blow a whistle for 5 seconds.
  • The most senior individual in charge will then say, “The Lock Down has now ended, everyone follow me and the educators in an orderly manner”.

 

Sources
National Quality Standard
Education and Care Services National Regulations

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually. Review will be conducted by

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Parents/Families
  • Interested Parties

Medical Conditions Policy

NQS


QA2

2.1.1

Each child’s health needs are supported.

2.1.4

Steps are taken to control the spread of infectious diseases and to manage injuries and illness, in accordance with recognised guidelines.

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations


Reg

90

Medical conditions policy

90(1)(iv)

Medical Conditions Communication Plan

91

Medical conditions policy to be provided to parents

92

Medication record

93

Administration of medication

94

Exception to authorisation requirement—anaphylaxis or asthma emergency

95

Procedure for administration of medication

96

Self-administration of medication

EYLF


LO3

Children are happy, healthy, safe and connected to others.

Educators promote continuity of children’s personal health and hygiene by sharing ownership of routines and schedules with children, families and the community

Educators discuss health and safety issues with children and involve them in developing guidelines to keep the environment safe for all

Aim
The service and all educators can effectively respond to and manage medical conditions including asthma, diabetes and anaphylaxis at the service to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children, staff and visitors.
Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Administration of First Aid Policy
Death of a Child Policy
Emergency Service Contact Policy
Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy
Enrolment Policy
Food Nutrition and Beverage Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
HIV AIDS Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy

Implementation
The service will involve all educators, families and children in regular discussions about medical conditions and general health and wellbeing throughout our curriculum. The service will adhere to privacy and confidentiality procedures when dealing with individual health needs.
A copy of the Medical Conditions Policy must be provided to all educators and volunteers at the service. The Policy must also be provided to parents of children enrolled at the service including those whose child has been identified as having a specific health care need or allergy. Educators are also responsible for raising any concerns with a child’s parents about any medical condition/suspected medical condition, or known allergens that pose a risk to the child.
No child enrolled at the service will be able to attend the service without medication prescribed by their medical practitioner. In particular, no child who has been prescribed an adrenaline auto-injection device, insulin injection device or asthma inhaler is permitted to attend the service or its programs without the device.
Families are required to provide information about their child’s health care needs, allergies, medical conditions and medication on the Enrolment Form and are responsible for updating the service about of these things, including any new medication, ceasing of medication, or changes to their child’s prescription.
All educators and volunteers at the service must follow a child’s Medical Management Plan in the event of an incident related to a child’s specific health care need, allergy or medical condition.
Our service will implement the following communications plan to ensure that parents are reminded to advise of any changes which will impact the Medical Management Plan and Risk Minimisation Plan:
Parents use both verbal & non-verbal forms of communication to inform educators of changes to their child’s medical treatment. Parents must fill in an appropriate plan and/or medication form for educators to administer medication. Reminders to update plans will be put up in the foyer and/or placed in newsletters to parents.

Information that must be provided in Enrolment Record
The service’s Enrolment Form provides an opportunity for parents to help the service effectively meet their child’s needs relating to any medical condition.
The enrolment record will include details of any:

  • specific health care needs or medical conditions of the child, including asthma, diabetes, allergies, and whether the child has been diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis.
  • any Medical Management Plan provided by a child’s parents and/or registered medical practitioner. This Plan should:
    • have supporting documentation if appropriate
    • include a photo of the child
    • if relevant, state what triggers the allergy or medical condition
    • first aid needed
    • contact details of the doctor who signed the plan
    • state when the Plan should be reviewed.

Copies of the plan should be kept with the child’s medication and also accompany them on any excursions.
Where there is a Medical Management Plan, a risk minimisation plan must be developed and informed from the child’s Medical Management Plan.
Note parents are responsible for updating their child’s Medical Management Plan/providing a new Plan as necessary and will be regularly reminded by the service as per the Medical Management Communications Plan.
Any new information will be attached to the Enrolment Form and kept on file at the service. Educators will ensure information that is displayed about a child’s medical conditions is updated.

Identifying Children with Medical Conditions

Any information relating to a child’s medical conditions will be shared with relevant educators, volunteers and the family day care co-ordinator at the service. Educators will be briefed by the family day care co-ordinator on the specific health needs of each child.
Our service will implement the following communications plan to ensure that relevant educators, staff and volunteers are:

  • informed about the Medical Conditions Policy
  • easily able to identify a child with medical conditions
  • are aware of the requirements of any medical management plans and risk minimisation plans
  • aware of the location of each child’s medication
  • updated on the child’s treatment along with any regulatory changes that may affect practices for specific medical conditions.
  • Educators will read the policy prior to commencing employment. Specialty menus and forms for allergy or illness will be located in each rooms for educators reference

Our service will display information about a child’s medical management plan, risk minimisation plan, and the location of each child’s medication in an area near a telephone that is visible and easily accessed by all educators eg food preparation or serving area to ensure all procedures are followed. We will ensure the display of information meets privacy guidelines and is not accessible to visitors or other families. We will explain to families why this is important for the safety of the child and obtain parental consent.
Where a child has been diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis, a notice stating this must be displayed at the service so it is clearly visible from the main entrance. The privacy and confidentiality of the child will be maintained at all times and the public notice will not name the child.

Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan
Using a child’s Medical Management Plan, our service will develop a Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan in consultation with a child’s parents and medical professionals which will ensure that:

  • any risks are assessed and minimised
  • if relevant, practices and procedures for the safe handling of food, preparation, consumption and service of food for the child are developed and implemented (note we will follow all health, hygiene and safe food policies and procedures)
  • all parents are notified of any known allergens that pose a risk to a child and how these risks will be minimised
  • a child does not attend the service without medication prescribed by their medical practitioner in relation to their specific medical condition.

Our service will provide support and information to all parents and other members of our community about resources and support for managing allergies, anaphylaxis asthma and diabetes.
Our service will routinely review each child’s medication to ensure it hasn’t expired.

Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan: Anaphylaxis/Allergy Management
While not common, anaphylaxis is life threatening. Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction to a substance. While prior exposure to allergens is needed for the development of true anaphylaxis, severe allergic reactions can occur when no documented history exists. We are aware that allergies are very specific to the individual and it is possible to have an allergy to any foreign substance.
Anaphylaxis is usually caused by a food allergy. Foods most commonly associated with anaphylaxis include peanuts, seafood, nuts and in children eggs and cow’s milk. While developing the Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan and to minimise the risk of exposure of children to foods that might trigger severe allergy or anaphylaxis in susceptible children, our service will:

  • not allow children to trade food, utensils or food containers.
  • prepare food in line with a child’s medical management plan and family recommendations.
  • use non-food rewards with children, for example, stickers for appropriate behaviour.
  • request families to label all bottles, drinks and lunchboxes etc with their child’s name.
  • consider whether it’s necessary to change or restrict the use of food products in craft, science experiments and cooking classes so children with allergies can participate.
  • instruct educators on the need to prevent cross contamination.
  • request all parents not to send food with their children that contain highly allergenic elements even if their child does not have an allergy by, for example, placing a sign in the foyer or near the front door reminding families about this.
  • where a child is known to have a susceptibility to severe allergy or anaphylaxis to a particular food, the service will have a “allergy-awareness policy” for that food e.g. an “Allergy-Aware (Nut) Policy” which would exclude children or other individuals visiting the service from bringing any foods or products containing nuts or nut material such as :
    • peanuts, brazil nuts, cashew nuts, hazelnuts, almonds, pecan nuts
    • any other type of tree or ground nuts, peanut oil or other nut based oil or cooking product, peanut or any nut sauce, peanut butter, hazelnut spread, marzipan
    • any other food which contains nuts such as chocolates, sweets, lollies, nougat, ice creams, cakes, biscuits, bread, drinks, satays, pre-prepared Asian or vegetarian foods
    • foods with spices and seeds such as mustard, poppy, wheat and sesame seeds
    • cosmetics, massage oils, body lotions, shampoos and creams such as Arachis oil that contain nut material.
  • be aware that a child may have a number of food allergies or there may be a number of children with different food allergies, and it may not be possible to have an allergy free policy for all those foods involved. Nut allergy is the most likely to cause severe reaction and will take precedence.
  • if appropriate, seat a child with allergies at a different table if food is being served that he/she is allergic to. This will always be done in a sensitive manner so that the child does not feel excluded. If a child is very young, the family may be asked to provide their own high chair to further minimise the risk of cross infection.
  • hold non-allergic babies when they drink formula/milk or there is a child diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis from a milk allergy.
  • ensure all children with food allergies only eat food and snacks that have been prepared for them at home where possible.
  • instruct food preparation staff and volunteers about measures necessary to prevent cross contamination between foods during the handling, preparation and serving of food, such as careful cleaning of food preparation areas and utensils.
  • closely supervise all children at meal and snack times and ensure food is eaten in specified areas. To minimise risk children will not be permitted to ‘wander around’ the service with food.
  • ensure meals prepared at the service do not contain ingredients such as milk, eggs or nuts.
  • consult risk minimisation plans when making food purchases and planning menus.

Allergic reactions and anaphylaxis are also commonly caused by:

  • all types of animals, insects, spiders and reptiles.
  • all drugs and medications, especially antibiotics and vaccines.
  • many homeopathic, naturopathic and vitamin preparations.
  • many species of plants, especially those with thorns and stings.
  • latex and rubber products.
    • Band-Aids, Elastoplast and products containing rubber based adhesives.

Our service will ensure that body lotions, shampoos and creams used on allergic children are approved by their parent.
Risk minimisation practices will be carried out to ensure that the service is to the best of our ability providing an environment that will not trigger an anaphylactic reaction. These practices will be documented and reflected upon, and potential risks reduced if possible.
The service will display an Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy inc (ASCIA) generic poster called Action Plan for Anaphylaxis in a key location at the service, for example, in the children’s room, the staff room or near the medication cabinet
http://www.allergy.org.au/content/view/10/3/#r1
Our service will ensure that the auto-injection device kit is stored in a location that is known to all staff, including relief staff, easily accessible to adults (not locked away), inaccessible to children, and away from direct sources of heat.
Educators should be on the lookout for symptoms of an allergic reaction as they need to act rapidly if they do occur. If a child is displaying symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction our service will:

  • call an ambulance immediately by dialling 000
  • ensure the first aid trained educator/educator with approved anaphylaxis management training provides appropriate first aid which may include the injection of an auto immune device EpiPen® in line with the steps outlined by the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy http://allergy.org.au/health-professionals/anaphylaxis-resources/ascia-action-plan-for-anaphylaxis and CPR if the child stops breathing.
  • contact the parent/guardian or the person to be notified in the event of illness if the parent/guardian cannot be contacted.

Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan: Asthma Management
Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways. While developing the Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan our service will implement procedures where possible to minimise the exposure of susceptible children to the common triggers which can cause an asthma attack. These triggers include:

  • dust and pollution
  • inhaled allergens, for example mould, pollen, pet hair
  • changes in temperature and weather, heating and air conditioning
  • emotional changes including laughing and stress
  • activity and exercise

Risk minimisation practices will be carried out to ensure that the service is to the best of our ability providing an environment that will not trigger an asthmatic reaction. These practices will be documented and reflected upon, and potential risks reduced if possible.
The service will display an Asthma chart called First Aid for Asthma Chart for under 12 years or Asthma First Aid in a key location at the service, for example, in the children’s room, the staff room or near the medication cabinet http://www.nationalasthma.org.au/uploads/content/22-NAC-First-Aid-for-Asthma-Chart-Kids-FINAL.pdf or http://asthmaaustralia.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/AA-Live-Well-with-Asthma-0512-WEB.pdf
An asthma attack can become life threatening if not treated properly. If a child is displaying asthma symptoms, our service will:

  • ensure a first aid trained educator/educator with approved asthma management training immediately attends to the child. If the procedures outlined in the child’s medical management plan do not alleviate the asthma symptoms, or the child does not have a medical management plan, the educator will provide appropriate first aid, which may include the steps outlined by Asthma Australia as follows:
  • Sit the child upright
    • Stay with the child and be calm and reassuring
  • Give 4 puffs of blue reliever puffer medication
    • Use a spacer if there is one
    • Shake puffer
    • Put 1 puff into spacer
    • Take 4 breaths from spacer
    • Repeat until 4 puffs have been taken

Shake, 1 puff, 4 breaths

  • Wait 4 minutes
    • If there is no improvement, give 4 more puffs as above

 

  • If there is still no improvement call emergency assistance 000
    • Keep giving 4 puffs every 4 minutes until emergency assistance arrives
  • contact the child’s parent or authorised contact where the parent cannot be reached

The service will ensure that an Emergency Asthma First Aid Kit is stored in a location that is known to all staff, including relief staff, easily accessible to adults (not locked away), inaccessible to children, and at room temperature in dry areas. An Emergency Asthma First Aid kit should contain:

  • Blue or grey reliever puffer
  • At least 2 spacer devices that are compatible with the puffer
  • At least 2 face masks compatible with the spacer for use by children under 5

Spacers and masks can only be used by one person. That person can re-use the spacer or mask but it cannot be used by anyone else. We will ensure the child’s name is written on the spacer and mask when it is used.
Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan: Diabetes
Diabetes is a chronic condition where the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Glucose levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin.
The most common form of diabetes in children is type 1. The body’s immune system attacks the insulin producing cells so insulin can no longer be made. People with type 1 diabetes need to have insulin daily and test their blood glucose several times a day, follow a healthy eating plan and participate in regular physical activity.
Type 2 diabetes is managed by regular physical activity and healthy eating. Over time type 2 diabetics may also require insulin.
While developing the Medical Conditions Risk Minimisation Plan our service will implement procedures where possible to ensure children with diabetes do not suffer any adverse effects from their condition while at the service. These include ensuring they do not suffer from hypoglycaemia (have a “hypo”) which occurs when blood sugar levels are too low. Things that can cause a “hypo” include:

  • A delayed or missed meal, or a meal with too little carbohydrate
  • Extra strenuous or unplanned physical activity
  • Too much insulin or medication for diabetes
  • Vomiting

Children with Type 1 diabetes may also need to limit their intake of sweet foods. Our service will ensure information about the child’s diet including the types and amounts of appropriate foods is part of the child’s Medical Management Plan and that this is used to develop the Risk Minimisation Plan.
Our service will ensure our first aid trained educator is trained in the use of the insulin injection device (syringes, pens, pumps) used by children at our service with diabetes.
If a child is displaying symptoms of a “hypo” our service will:

    • ensure the first aid trained educator provides immediate first aid which will be outlined in the child’s medical management plan and may include giving the child some quick acting and easily consumed carbohydrate.
    • call an ambulance by dialling 000 if the child does not respond to the first aid and CPR if the child stops breathing.
    • contact the parent/guardian or the person to be notified in the event of illness if the parent/guardian cannot be contacted.

Educator Training and Qualifications
Our service will ensure that at least one educator attending the service:

    • holds a current approved first aid qualification
    • has undertaken current approved anaphylaxis management training and
    • has undertaken current approved emergency asthma management training (required from 1 January 2013).

Our staffing Arrangements Policy has more details about educator training and qualifications in this area.

Educators in our service recognise how serious anaphylaxis is and will undertake steps to minimise the possibility of occurrence. The service will maintain the following in relation to educator qualifications for anaphylaxis:

  • all educators in all services whether or not they have a child diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis undertakes training in the administration of the adrenaline auto-injection device and cardio- pulmonary resuscitation every 12 months.
  • Practice using adrenaline auto-injection devices with the Anaphylaxis Resource Kits provided by the Victorian regulator will be undertaken regularly, preferably quarterly, and recorded. The kit will be stored separately to a child’s medication to ensure that there is no confusion.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Asthma Australia
National Asthma Organisation
The Asthma Foundation Victoria
Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergywww.allergy.org.au
Australian Diabetes Council

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Last reviewed: 18/04/2013 Date for next review: 18/04/2013

 

National Quality Framework Policy

Aim
Our service participates in the National Quality Framework (NQF). The service aims is to provide the highest quality education and care available across all areas.
Related Policies
Enrolment Policy
Educators Orientation Policy
Who is affected by this policy?
Educators
Families
Child
Management
Visitors

Implementation
Our Service participates in and values the National Quality Framework (NQF), including the National Quality Standard (NQS), the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) and the National Regulations – an Australian Government initiative linked to the funding of the Child Care Benefit for parents. This is conducted through the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) and the state licensing department through scheduled site assessment visits and where appropriate, spontaneous visits.
The NQS provides standards of quality practices for care provided in our Service as well as guidance and support from the Service’s self evaluation through our Quality Improvement Plan (QIP). The system also allows educators to continually improve practices by identifying the quality aspects of care the Service is already providing and assisting the Service in developing goals for further improvement through our QIP. The Service is required to complete and submit a comprehensive QIP every twelve months.
The Service will ensure that all educators and management are informed about current practices and requirements in the NQF process by attending appropriate in-service/training, accessing any other publications and information about the accreditation process that may be of benefit – including those published by ACECQA.
Educators will involve parents, families and management in each stage to seek their input and views into practices and care in our Service – this includes having parent input into policy reviews, parent meetings and providing updates in newsletters about the Service’s current stage in the process.


The seven Standards under the NQS are –
1. Educational program and practice
2. Children’s health and safety
3. Physical environment
4. Staffing arrangements
5. Relationships with children
6. Collaborative partnerships with families and communities

7. Leadership and service management

The Rating System

The NQS is accompanied by a national quality rating and assessment process that promotes transparency and accountability and assists parents to make informed choices about the quality of education and care at a service. Our service will display the rating received for each quality area and the overall rating.
The Ratings are as follows –

  • Excellent
  • Exceeding National Quality Standard
  • Meeting National Quality Standard
  • Working towards National Quality Standard
  • Significant improvement required.

We will access regular updates on the ACECQA website – www.acecqa.gov.au

Sources
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

reviewed: 1/7/2012 Date for next review: 1/7/2013

Orientation for Children Policy

NQF

QA6

6.1.1

There is an effective enrolment and orientation process for families.

6.3.2

Continuity of learning and transitions for each child are supported by sharing relevant information and clarifying responsibilities

National Regulations

Reg

177

Prescribed enrolment and other documents to be kept by approved provider

Aim
To provide children and families with an orientation procedure that allows the child and family to transition to their child being in care, transition to a new room within the service or transitioning to school.

Related Policies
Enrolment Policy
Family Law and Access Policy
Parental Interaction and Involvement in the Service Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy
Unenrolled Children Policy

 

Implementation
We believe orientation is an important process where educators are able to get important information about the new child’s needs and those of the family. This process helps to make the transition from home to care as smooth as possible with the aim to maintain continuity between home and the service, which helps the child adjust to the new setting.
The Nominated Supervisor will arrange for the new child to attend the service (together with parents/s) to visit and meet the staff, and familiarise with the environment. The children may participate in the activities if they so desire. A number of young children prefer to just watch, rather than do. Positive interactions at this time (between parents, educators and the child) are important for the children to build positive attitudes to the service environment. Educators are aware that some children respond to new experiences faster than others and will adapt to the situation.
At this time, the daily timetable and program will be discussed, as well as routines and any special requirements for the child that may need to be accommodated. Parent/s will also be encouraged to send any special comfort items (teddy etc) to help the child in the initial settling in period. Parents will also be invited to ring and check on their child at any time if there are any concerns.
Part of this orientation visit is also to explain/collect the required documentation for the child (enrolment form, birth certificate, immunisation record and Medicare number etc). Staff will also explain modes of fee payment and communication (newsletters, pockets, communication box etc), what the child will need, the importance of labelling personal items and also show the parent library where they can access the service’s policies and other resources. Following the parent accompanied orientation visit the parent will encouraged to follow up with a 2 hour orientation visit without parents. Parents will organise a time to drop the child off for a 2 hour period to see how the child reacts and copes with the new environment. After this 2 hour visit educators and parents will liase together to discuss the best path for the child to continue care. This may be a few ½ days if the child hasn’t settled or start full day care.
Educators will also discuss how best to tailor the child’s settling in period – with some parents choosing to gradually build up to a full day so the child is reassured that the parents will return to collect them. Educators will encourage parents to say goodbye when dropping off – and reassured that if the child remains distressed over a period of time, that educators will contact them. Parents are able to stay as long as needed to reassure their child, but sometimes it’s easier for the educator to settle the child if the parents come earlier on collection to spend time with their child – rather than do this at drop off time.
Parents will be kept informed about how their child is settling in on collection and are welcome to discuss any aspects with the Nominated Supervisor at a convenient time.
Information on the service’s child orientation policy will be available in different languages when required.

 

Transition

The service aims to arrange for room transitions when a vacancy occurs or at the beginning of the new year. As each room has different challenges and expectations, children will only be transitioned when they are ready in all aspects of their development. The opportunity to transition between groups / rooms at the service is based on many factors other than just age. When the child becomes of the age to attend school, the service
The service will work with the parents and the school to prepare the child for school entry.
Transition from one room to another
Change is harder for some children than others, however, by making this transition as smooth as possible for children and families, we are helping build the child’s success. Separation can evoke children’s deep feelings which can trigger restlessness, frustration etc.
Implementation
As to minimise any distress that the transfer may cause;

  • Think about the transition ahead of time. Lay the groundwork for a new teacher to get to know their child by sharing information and insights you have gained.
  • Talk to families about how their child handles change and the strategies they use to help their child cope with change
  • Plan to have the child and family visit the new group more than once if possible.
  • Invite the new teacher to visit the child in their room numerous times
  • Talk about change, starting from 2 weeks before the transition
  • Don’t talk about the transition in terms of concern or sorrow
  • Talk about their new teacher everyday in general conversation
  • Celebrate the child’s last day in the room with a special snack or by signing a special song you have made together
  • Be sure to say goodbye.

Transition to school
When a child first attends school, there is a great change for that child and for their family. We believe that the child’s parents are the most important link in this transition.

  • The better the transition between home and school, the better the education: that’s the message of recent research.
  • The Service will always talk about starting school in a positive manner that will reinforce a healthy attitude toward the transition.
  • If possible, information on local schools will be made available to parents.
  • Toward the end of each year an excursion is arranged to visit the local school so as to familiarise the children with the school environment.
  • Parents with children who are of eligible age to commence school in the following year will be given a school readiness book in October/November.
  • Information regarding school readiness is issued in October.
  • Children will be encouraged to bring a school afternoon snack in term four to help prepare for school. Parents will be provided with information regarding appropriate nutrition and lunches for school.



Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations
National Quality Standard

 


Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties.

Parental Interaction and Involvement in the Service Policy

NQF

QA6

6.1.2

Families have opportunities to be involved in the service and contribute to service decisions.

6.1.3

Current information about the service is available to families

6.2.1

The expertise of families is recognised and they share in decision making about their child’s learning and wellbeing.

6.2.2

Current information is available to families about community services and resources to support parenting and family wellbeing.

6.3.4

The services builds relationships and engages with their local community

QA7

7.3.4

Processes are in place to ensure that all grievances and complaints are addressed, investigated fairly and documented in a timely manner.

National Regulations

Reg

157

Access For Parents

 

Aim

Communications between family members and the Service are considered crucial for a child to reach their full development. Therefore, we aim to provide an environment where there is a strong emphasis on family/Service communication to allow consistency and continuity between the home and the Service environment. By encouraging family members to be involved in the service, we aim to provide a service that best meets the needs of our community.
Related Policies
Educator and Management Policy
Enrolment Policy
Family Law and Access Policy
Fees Policy
Orientation for Children Policy

Implementation
Parent Communication
Our Service aims to provide as many outlets as possible for family/service communication. These include:

  • Face to face.
  • A monthly newsletter which will be put in the children’s cubbies to be taken home.
  • A communications book in the service’s foyer.
  • A notice board displaying upcoming events and notices.
  • Regular informal meetings with parents and the opportunity to plan formal meetings if necessary.
  • A suggestions box in the foyer where parents can anonymously (or give their names if desired) make suggestions to improve the service.
  • Short surveys regarding the service’s philosophy and how you feel your child/ren feel about the service.
  • Each family will be allocated a ‘pocket’ where private correspondence between educators, the nominated supervisor or approved provider and the family can take place.

If necessary, educators have support and access to translation services to provide this information for non-English speaking families.
Parent Grievances
Any parent/caregiver with a concern or complain in relation to the running of our Service either in administration or child interaction should do the following:

  • Voice their complaint or concern with the nominated supervisor or approved provider.
  • Write their complaint or concern addressing it to the nominated supervisor or approved provider. You will receive a personal response unless you have chosen to be anonymous.
  • Parents can speak to any educator or member of staff about a specific complaint or concern. Educators or staff will put in steps to address your concern or complaint as quickly as possible. However, educators and staff do reserve the right to have the complaint put in writing.
  • If a service-wide problem has been brought to our attention all families and staff will be informed of the contents of your complaint but not your name.
  • The service will use the Grievance Procedure/Register to ensure that the grievance is followed through and sufficiently investigated.

Parental and Family Involvement

  • Families are welcome to visit at any time of the day.
  • Families are encouraged to make suggestions and offer critique on our program, philosophy, management and food menu.
  • Families are encouraged to share aspects of their culture with the educators and children as well as appropriate experiences.
  • Families are invited to participate in the service’s daily routine by helping out with activities such as craft, the preparation of morning tea, special activities and afternoon tea.
  • A family/staff committee will be established to set goals for the service, help write and implement policies and help to meet aims of the NQF Assessment process.
  • Minutes of regular staff/parents meetings will be kept aside for either side to make suggestions.

 

Open Doors

O Our Service can be accessed at any time for parental inspection.
P Please come and see how we help your child develop and grow.
E Entry by you any time shows that we are happy for you to see our practices at any time of the day.
N Never leave your child in a Service unless you feel 100% competent in their ability to provide for your child.
D Don’t hesitate to ask us any questions about your child, their development or our Service philosophy.
O Our Service is proud of the quality of care we provide.
O Our educators are qualified, trained, experienced and talented.
R Rather than take our word for this
S See for yourselves!


Parent Survey Template

Parent Questionnaire

Dear Parent

We wish to provide your child/ren with the highest level of care. In order to do this, we would like your opinion on how you feel the Service is being run and how our programs and our philosophy are helping your child develop. It would help us if you provided us with your thoughts on what our Service’s strengths and weaknesses are so we can work to improve these.
Attached is a questionnaire which asks your opinion of some important educational issues. It would help us if you could answer these as honestly as possible. Your responses will be kept private and confidential.

Please return completed survey by_________________

Thank you for your participation.

___________________________
Nominated Supervisor


Parent Survey

Strongly Agree

Agree

Disagree

Don’t Know

1. I feel welcomed in the Service.

2. The Service takes my concerns seriously.

3. The Service provides helpful information.

4. I feel as though I can talk to the educators about my child’s progress.

5. The Service values my help and interest.

6. Teachers provide a challenging and stimulating environment for my child.

7. Teachers care if my child is not doing as well as he/she can.

8. The Service has a safe and secure environment.

9. The Service is always looking for ways to improve what it does.

10. The educators regularly praise children.

11. The children are the Service’s main focus.

12. I share in the education of my child.

13. I receive adequate notice of Service events.

14. Newsletters are regular and informative.

15. The Service’s aims are to improve the quality of learning and teaching.

What do you see as the strengths of the Service?

How do you see the Service could be improved?

In what ways would you like to be more involved in the Service?

What other comments would you like to make (if any)

Thank you for taking the time to respond to these questions.

This form should be returned to the office by ______________

Sources
National Quality Standard
Education and Care Services National Regulations
Administration, Hand with Care. (1987). Sebastian, Patricia. AE Press: Melbourne.

 

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually. Review will be conducted by

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Parents/Families
  • Interested Parties

Photography Policy

NQS


QA4

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

QA5

5.2.3

The dignity and the rights of every child are maintained at all times

EYLF

LO1

1.1

Children feel safe, secure, and supported

Aim
To ensure the privacy of children and families is respected when any individual who is not a staff member or educator is taking photographs within the service.

Related Policies
Child Protection Policy
Educator and Management Policy
Enrolment Policy
Parental Interaction and Involvement in the Service Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Social Networking Usage Policy

 

Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Families
Educators
Management

Implementation
For Parents and Family Members
In relation to any parent or family member who is visiting the service with the intention to take photographs the service will ensure:

  • All families are notified in advance of when, why and by whom photographs may be taken in the Service.
  • All families are given the opportunity to object to their child being involved in any photographs, and that these wishes are respected via our enrolment form.
  • Any parent or family member may only photograph their own child unless given permission by another child’s parent.

The Service accepts that families may want to display photographs of their own child on the internet; however we do not condone the display of photographs taken of children from other families.
The Service will respect the wishes of all families who do not wish their child to be photographed for use in newspapers, publications or our website as stated in our enrolment form. However employees will take photos for educational purposes to assist in supporting the centre curriculum. These photos may be displayed throughout the centre internally.
Photo’s may be taken by employees to accompany an incident or illness report and will only be shared with parents/guardians of that child and/or regulatory authorities if necessary.
If a parent has given permission for their child to be photographed by anyone other than a staff member or educator, the Service does not accept responsibility for the distribution or use of any photograph taken.
For any other Individual
The Service does not allow any other individual visiting the service to take photographs of any child without written permission from the child’s parent or authorised nominee. An example of such an individual may be a School Photographer.
Sources
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Reviewed: 22/7/2013 Date for next review: 22/7/2014

Physical Activity Promotion Policy

NQS

QA2

2.2.2

Physical activity is promoted through planned and spontaneous experiences and is appropriate for each child.

EYLF

LO3

Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing

Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing


Aim
To provide children with a physically active program that is developmentally appropriate.

Related Policies

Additional Needs Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy
Relationships with Children Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Children
Families
Educators
Management

Implementation
The service will implement the Get Up & Grow, Healthy Eating for Physical Activity for Early Childhood program. A copy of the program can be found at the below web address:
http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/.../gug-directorscoord.pdf
In line with this, our service will implement the following promotion of physical activity as per the age and development stage of each child in attendance:

  • For healthy development in infants (birth to 1 year), physical activity – particularly supervised floor-based play in safe environments – should be encouraged from birth.
  • Toddlers (1 to 3 years) and pre-schoolers (3 to 5 years) should be physically active every day for at least three hours, spread throughout the day.
  • Children younger than two years of age should not spend any time watching television or using other electronic media (DVDs, computer and other electronic games).
  • For children two to five years of age, sitting and watching television and the use of other electronic media (DVDs, computer and other electronic games) should be limited to less than one hour per day.
  • Infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers should not be sedentary, restrained or kept inactive for more than one hour at a time – with the exception of sleeping

Educator’s Will:

  • Encourage children to participate in physical activities through programming and spontaneous experiences.
  • Encourage and support children to undertake and participate in new or unfamiliar physical activities.
  • Participate in physical activity with the children.
  • Show enthusiasm for participation in physical activity and organise play spaces to ensure the safety and wellbeing of all individuals in the environment.
  • Set up and plan for plan for physical play activities and equipment and where appropriate encourage the children to help with the set-up.
  • Listen to children’s suggestions on what physical activities they would like to participate in and where appropriate incorporate them into the program
  • Set up indoor and outdoor areas in a manner that promotes and encourages safe physical play for all age groups and developmental abilities represented in the service.
  • Actively encourage children to accept and respect each other’s range of physical abilities.
  • Consult with families and resource agencies on providing physical experiences that reflect diverse backgrounds and abilities.
  • Role model appropriate footwear and clothing for physical activity.
  • Will ensure a balance of active and sedentary activities throughout the child’s day and minimize sedentary behaviours unless the child is tired or ill.



The service will support the children in:

  • Learning to use increasingly complex motor skills and movement patterns in order to combine gross and fine movement and balance skills, spatial awareness and problem-solving skills.
  • The development of their physical skill set by providing regular opportunities for outdoor play.
  • The development of their physical skill set by talking with children about how the human body and how important physical activity is for an individual’s health and wellbeing.
  • The development of their physical skill set by providing experiences for the children that draw on elements of dance, dramatic play and creative movement.
  • The development of their physical skill set by providing babies with encouragement and safe areas to practice rolling over, sitting, crawling, standing and walking.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Get up and Grow, Health Eating and Physical Activity for Early Childhood

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy

Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy


NQS

QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

QA3

3.1.1

Outdoor and indoor spaces, buildings, furniture, equipment, facilities and resources are suitable for their purpose

3.1.2

Premises, furniture and equipment are safe, clean and well maintained

3.1.3

Facilities are designed or adapted to ensure access and participation by every child in the service and to allow flexible use, and interaction between indoor and outdoor space.

3.2.1

Outdoor and indoor spaces are designed and organised to engage every child in quality experiences in both built and natural environments.

3.2.2

Resources, materials and equipment are sufficient in number, organised in ways that ensure appropriate and effective implementation of the program and allow for multiple uses

QA6

6.1.1

There is an effective enrolment and orientation process for families

6.1.2

Families have opportunities to be involved in the service and contribute to service decisions

6.1.3

Current information about the service is available to families

6.2.1

The expertise of families is recognised and they share in decision making about their child’s learning and wellbeing.

6.2.2

Current information is available to families about community services and resources to support parenting and family wellbeing.

6.3.1

Links with relevant community and support agencies are established and maintained.

6.3.2

Continuity of learning and transitions for each child are supported by sharing relevant information and clarifying responsibilities.

6.3.3

Access to inclusion and support assistance is facilitated

6.3.4

The service builds relationships and engages with their local community.


 

National Regulations


Reg

182

Tobacco, drug and alcohol free environment

156

Relationships in groups

103

Premises, furniture and equipment to be safe, clean and in good repair

104

Fencing and security

105

Furniture, materials and equipment

106

Laundry and hygiene facilities

107

Space requirements—indoor

108

Space requirements—outdoor space

109

Toilet and hygiene facilities

110

Ventilation and natural light

111

Administrative space

112

Nappy change facilities

113

Outdoor space—natural environment

114

Outdoor space—shade

115

Premises designed to facilitate supervision

116

Assessments of family day care residences and approved family day care venues

117

Glass (additional requirement for family day care

73

Educational programs

74

Documenting of child assessments or evaluations for delivery of educational program

75

Information about the educational program to be kept available

76

Information about educational program to be given to parents

80

Weekly menu

86

Notification to parents of incident, injury, trauma and illness

99

Children leaving the education and care service premises

102

Authorisation for excursions

111

Administrative space (centre-based services)

168(2)(k)

Policies and procedures are required in relation to enrolment and orientation

171

Policies and procedures to be kept available


 

EYLF


LO2

 

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Children respond to diversity with respect

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

LO4

Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity,
commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation,
hypothesising, researching and investigating

Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another

Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials



Aim
To provide a physical environment that is safe, appealing, constructive, well-maintained and welcoming to all individuals who use it.

Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Animal and Pet Policy
Administration of Authorised Medication Policy
Bushfire Policy
Chemical Spills
Continuity of Education and Care Policy
Emergency Management and Evacuation
Enrolment Policy
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy
Orientation for Children Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Tobacco, Drug and Alcohol Policy
Sleep, Rest, Relaxation and Clothing Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy
Technology Usage Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Children
Families
Educators
Management

Implementation

In relation to our physical environment, the service will:

  • Provide an environment that fosters children’s learning, development and safety and the safety of others in the environment by:
    • Providing appropriately sized furniture and equipment in both the indoor and outdoor settings for the age ranges represented in the service.
    • Providing challenges in relation to indoor and outdoor elements in the environment to encourage appropriate challenges and risk taking as per each child’s developmental level.
    • Providing an environment that is well organised so children, educators and others in the environment can generally move around without having to disrupt other children’s activities.
    • Incorporating any specific requirements of children with additional needs as seamlessly as possible.
    • Incorporating soft fall material into our environment and placing any climbing play equipment, swings or slides on soft fall materials.
    • Undertaking regular risk assessments of the service’s environment to ensure that risk is minimised at all times.
    • Providing an environment that allows children in various moods to exist in the same space (e.g. quiet play areas and loud play areas)
    • Providing experiences for children to interact with nature by including natural elements (e.g. plants, trees, gardens, rock, mud or water) in our outdoor environment
    • Providing adequate and ongoing training for new and existing educators and volunteers in relation to the children’s learning and relevant safety considerations.
    • As part of our sun protection strategy, providing adequate shading as per the recommendations of recognised authorities.
    • Establishing the environment to allow children to be appropriately supervised at all times.
    • Fencing the area in order to provide safety.
    • Engaging the children in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor experiences.
    • Enabling the children to access appropriate furniture, resources, materials, toys and equipment. These resources will be adequate in number for the amount of children attending our service and be developmentally appropriate.
    • Providing an environment where children can explore, solve problems, create, construct and engage in critical thinking that is developmentally appropriate for the ages represented in the service.
    • Providing an environment that allows children to engage in activities independently or work in small groups and access resources independently.
    • Providing an environment that encourages large and small group and independent activities.
    • Providing an environment that incorporates commercial, natural, recycled, home-made and real resources that can be used in a variety of ways to encourage children’s learning.
    • Providing adequate and accessible hand-washing, toileting, eating and sleeping facilities as per the amount of children attending our service. In relation to toileting and hand-washing, these will be accessible from both our indoor and outdoor environments.
    • If children attending the service use nappies, the service will provide adequate and appropriate hygienic facilities for nappy changing. If children at the service are under 3 years of age, there will be at least 1 properly constructed nappy changing bench. The nappy change facility are designed, located and maintained to ensure that children cannot access them without being directly supervised.
    • Establishing an environment that incorporates natural and artificial lighting, appropriate ventilation, heating and cooling and fresh air.
    • Provide appropriate areas for food preparation.
    • Provide quiet areas where children can sleep or rest.
    • Providing a separate indoor space for children who are under two years of age.
    • Providing a space for administrative functions, consultation with children’s parents and for private conversations to take place.
    • Ensuring children’s safety by ensuring that power points not in use have safety caps, all double adaptors and power-boards are out of reach of children and all electrical cords are secured.
    • Discussing with children the safety aspects of using toys and equipment. When circumstances allow, we will involve the children in setting these rules.
    • Communicating with families about the latest available safety information and making them information available to families.
    • Compiling details of maintenance logs and records of building and equipment.
    • Ensuring all equipment, including resources, equipment, car seats, booster seats etc meets relevant Australian Standards and educators are trained in correct maintenance and assembly.

Arrangements for Laundering of Soiled Items

  • The laundry area includes a washing machine, trough & dryer with hot & cold water supply for the laundering of soiled cloths, linen and nappies.

Choosing Appropriate Resources and Equipment

  • The service will maintain an up to date inventory/registry of equipment at the service.
  • The Approved Provider will be ultimately responsible for any purchases of equipment.
  • Educators will compile a list for the Approved Provider of equipment which needs maintenance on a prioritised basis, twice annually.
  • Resources and equipment will be chosen to reflect the cultural diversity of the service’s community and the cultural diversity of contemporary Australia, including the incorporation of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.
  • The service will actively seek the input of parents/guardians regarding toys and equipment at the service.
  • All new equipment will be checked against Australian Safety Standards.
  • Children will be carefully introduced to new toys & pieces of equipment and taught how to use and care for them appropriately.
  • Equipment that should only be used under supervision will be stored in a safe place pursuant to the relevant policies.
  • The use of pools and toys or equipment which involves the use of water will be used under the direct supervision of educators. All equipment will be emptied of water when not in use, and stored in such a manner that it cannot collect water.
  • Children will only use a trampoline whilst under the direct supervision of an adult educator.
  • Equipment will be checked regularly by the educators to ensure it is in a clean and safe condition.
  • The Approved Provider will advise the educator and parents about the purchase of new equipment and ensure a risk assessment is carried out.
  • All equipment purchased for the service will be within budget limitations.

Rearranging, Adding or Removing Furniture

  • Plans will be kept regarding the arrangement of the rooms and outdoor spaces. These plans will show how the service aims to create inviting learning spaces.
  • The service will keep a record of any changes that is made to the physical environment of the service, such as rearranging of rooms etc.
  • The service will document the links between the arrangements and choice of resources and equipment and the children’s learning.

On-going Maintenance

  • The service will consistently reflect on its environment and put in place a plan to ensure that the environment continuously reflects our ideology of providing an environment that is safe, stimulating and engaging for all who interact with it.
  • The Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor will put together an ongoing prioritised maintenance plan for the service at the beginning of each year. This will then be implemented throughout the year in accordance with any relevant policies.
  • It is the responsibility of the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor to complete a Building Safety Checklist of the service and its grounds bi-annually and ensure any works deemed necessary are done to Australian standards. The Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor will also ensure that the service and its grounds comply with Local Government and BCA regulations in regards to fire ventilation, natural and artificial lighting and safety glass.
  • Should the service undertake major renovations, management plans will be put in place to ensure that the safety of educators, children, families and others at the service is not compromised.

The Children’s Groupings
Our service groups the children throughout the day in rooms according to their age and/or developmental stage. Within that space, there are different areas where the children can explore and experience their own moods. For example, each room allows for a quiet play space, such as our book corner and a loud/physical play space such as the block area. Our outdoor environment also allows for children in different moods to be in the environment. Our outdoor table and chairs allows for children to engage in quiet activities while our climbing equipment and sandpit allows for children to engage in physical activities.
In order for children to interact with the children and educators from other rooms in the service, in the morning we have open play time, where all children attending the service are outside together.


Safety Checks
A daily inspection of the premises will be undertaken before children begin to arrive. This inspection will include the:

  • Perimeters
  • Fences
  • Gates
  • Paths
  • Buildings
  • All rooms accessible by children
  • Fixed equipment.

This must to be done in order to premeditate any dangerous objects in the grounds ranging from sharps to poisonous or dangers flora and fauna.
In the event of a sharp object being found (for example a syringe) educators will wear gloves and use tongs to pick up the object and place it in the ‘sharp object box’. This box will be disposed of as per the recommendations of our local council.
Similarly, trees in the grounds must be checked regularly for overhanging, dead or dangerous looking branches as well as check for any infestations or nests.
In regards to non-fixed play equipment in the service grounds it can be no more than one metre high and will not obstruct the sightlines of supervisory educators.
The service will also regularly have pest inspections carried out by an accreditation pest control company. Documentation of these inspections will be kept and any findings from the pest control check will be carried out in line with the recommendation of the pest control company.
The Indoor and Outdoor Daily Safety Checklists will be used as the procedure to conduct these safety checks. A record of these will be kept by the service. Any required maintenance will immediately be reported by the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor who will make the appropriate arrangements to have repairs carried out.


 

 

 

 

Please tick and sign when these tasks have been completed. Please write fridge & freezer time and temp in allocated boxes!

Daily Check
WEEK BEGINNING_____________________________


Outdoor

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Comments

Doors – finger jam protectors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fences – no climbing or escape routes for children, gates are locked

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garbage – inaccessible and lidded

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garden - debris removed

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheds - locked

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service – Cleanliness, (would you leave your child here?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-slip - floors, stairs, steps, paths

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandpit – clean and animal feces free

 

 

 

 

 

 

Under Service - no access

 

 

 

 

 

 

Window fly screens securely fitted

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blackberries

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check for broken toys, glass ect

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indoor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barriers - age appropriate, child proof, self locking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choking hazards e.g. small toy parts, beads etc secure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children’s Artwork – away from fans and heaters

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emergency evacuation - displayed

 

 

 

 

 

 

First aid kit - ready

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furniture and nursery equipment secure and safe

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plugs in all power points

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heaters Fans inaccessible to children

 

 

 

 

 

 

Machinery, tools and equipment - inaccessible

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cleaners Cupboard -Locked

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-slip and trip, floors, stairs, mats and rugs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cabinets locked with. chemicals, medicines, knives

 

 

 

 

 

 

Room Layouts - clear exit paths through setup of toys and children

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check Fire Danger- Check fire danger on computer and set sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check UV- Check UV rating and times & write when sunscreen must be applied in staff room

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fridge & FreezerTemp N/TP

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

Fridge & Freezer Temp
Kitchen

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

+

 

-

 

Signature:

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Cleaning of Buildings, Premises, Furniture and Equipment
General Cleaning
The service will use structured cleaning schedules to ensure that all cleaning is carried out regularly and thoroughly. Educators will clean the service at the end of each day and throughout the day as the need arises. Accidents and spills will be cleaned up as quickly as possible to ensure that the service always maintains a high level of cleanliness and hygiene.
When purchasing, storing and/or using any dangerous chemicals, substances, medicines or equipment, our service will:

  • Select and make use of the least hazardous substance or equipment.
  • Only purchase and make use of substances which have child resistant lids or caps. Educators will ensure that such lids or caps are properly fixed at all times.
  • Adhere at all times to manufacturer’s advice and instructions when using products to clean furniture and equipment at the service.
  • Store all dangerous chemicals, substances and medicines in their original containers provided by the manufacturer. All labels and/or use by dates should be kept intact at all times. Any substance found to be stored in a different container than originally provided, or with destroyed labels and/or unknown use by dates where appropriate will not be used under any circumstances. Containers should be disposed of correctly following local council guidelines, and not reused under any circumstances.
  • All dangerous chemicals, substances and equipment must be stored in a locked place or facility which is labelled, secure and inaccessible to children. These materials may include, but are not limited to, all cleaning materials, detergents, poisonous or dangerous substances, dangerous tools and equipment including those with sharp and razor edges and toiletries.
  • Educators should follow the instructions of manufacturers, particularly of any product which may need to be stored in a refrigerated environment pursuant to the aforementioned directives.
  • Particularly dangerous and hazardous materials such as pesticides, herbicides, petroleum, kerosene, solvents and equipment which is operated by an engine or hazardous to children, will be stored in a locked facility external to the main building of the service. The facility must have a bonded floor and be inaccessible to children and clearly labelled as storing dangerous substances and/or equipment. Such facilities should be separate from children’s play or outdoor environments.
  • Any substances that need to be refrigerated must be stored in a labelled, child resistant container, preferably in a separate compartment or in a part of the refrigerator inaccessible to children.
  • All hazardous chemicals must be supplied with a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) formerly called a Material Data Safety Sheet. Our service will adhere to the manufacturer’s instructions for use, storage, and first aid instructions recorded on the SDS.
  • The Service will keep a register of all hazardous chemicals, substances and equipment used at the Service. Information recorded should include where they are stored, their use, any risks, and first aid instructions and the current SDS. The register will be readily accessible.
  • Appropriate personal protective clothing should be worn pursuant to the manufacturer’s instructions when using and disposing of hazardous substances or equipment.
  • Seek medical advice immediately if poisoning or potentially hazardous ingestion, inhaled, skin or eye exposure has occurred, or call the Poisons Information Line on 131126, or call an Ambulance on 000.
  • In the case of any child or educator becoming injured by a chemical, substance or equipment, the service will initiate our emergency, medical and first aid procedures, notify the appropriate authority that administers workplace health and safety immediately and any other person or authority as required by regulations or guidelines.
  • In any major emergency involving a hazardous chemical or equipment, a hazardous gas or a fire or explosion hazard, call the emergency services, dial 000 and notify the appropriate authority that administers workplace health and safety and any other person or authority as required by regulations or guidelines.
  • The Poison Safety Checklist will be used in order to ensure we are consistently meeting requirements.

Minimising Potentially Dangerous Substances
Our service also implements the concept of minimising the use of potentially dangerous substances. Ordinary detergents will be used to help removed dirt from surfaces. Colour-coded sponges (e.g., pink for the kitchen, yellow for the bathroom) will be used in order to not cross-contaminate areas. Different rubber gloves will also be used in each room then hung out to dry and air. Before returning to the children educators will wash and dry hands.
Disinfectants
Disinfectants are usually unnecessary as very few germs can survive exposure to fresh air and natural light. In an outbreak situation, public health units may specify the use of a particular disinfectant. In this situation, for the disinfectant to work effectively, there still needs to be thorough cleaning using a detergent beforehand.
Essentially, there is no ideal disinfectant. Disinfectants cannot kill germs if the surface is not clean. It is more important to make ensure
Surfaces have been cleaned with detergent and warm water than to use a disinfectant. To kill germs, any disinfectant needs:

• A clean surface to be able to get to the germ.
• To be able to act against those particular germs.
• To be of the right concentrate on.
• Enough time to kill the germs, this is at least 10 minutes.
Even when all of these conditions are met a disinfectant will not kill all the germs present.

 

Detergents
Proper cleaning with detergent and warm water, followed by rising then drying and airing time kills most germs from surfaces as they are unable to multiply in a clean environment. Cleaning equipment should be stored and taken care of so it can dry between uses and not multiply germs itself.

 

 

 

 

 


Poison Safety Checklist
Week beginning:_____________


Checklist

Yes

No

Action required

Have all chemical products been checked to determine if they need to be stored in a lockable cupboard?

 

 

 

Have all chemical products been checked to determine if they require disposal (out of date or no longer required)?

 

 

 

Are all chemicals labelled correctly?

 

 

 

Are food and chemicals stored separately?

 

 

 

Are all Material Data Forms available for all chemicals in the Service and placed with the chemical?

 

 

 

SDS Register available?

 

 

 

SDS Register Current?

 

 

 

Are containers for soiled nappies securely covered and the contents inaccessible to children?

 

 

 

Are low toxicity products used whenever possible?

 

 

 

If any handbags contain medication, are they stored safely?

 

 

 

Is the Poisons Information Centre number available at every phone? (13 11 26)

 

 

 

Is there any paint flaking of the walls that may contain lead?

 

 

 

Have all poisonous plants been removed from the Service’s premises?

 

 

 

Have families been provided with information on poison safety?

 

 

 

Have chemical storage areas been labelled with chemicals stored here signs?

 

 

 

Medication is stored in locked containers/cupboard?

 

 

 

Educators Name:_____________________________
Educators Signature:__________________________


 

Cleaning Schedule

 

Wash DAILY plus when visibly soiled

Wash WEEKLY plus When visibly soiled

Bathrooms. Wash tap handles, toilet seats, toilet handles and door knobs. Check the bathroom during the day and clean if
Obviously soiled.

 

Toys and objects put in the mouth

 

Surfaces the children have frequent contact with, for example,
bench tops, taps, cots and tables.

 

Mattress covers and linen, if each child does not use the same mattress cover every day.

 

Door knobs

 

Floors.

 

Low shelves.

 

Other surfaces often touched by children

 

 

 

Special areas for Cleaning - nappy change area
Nappy change areas need to be cleaned after each use with detergent and warm water. If faecal matter spills onto the area wipe down with detergent and warm water and leave to dry. At the end of each day wash with warm water and leave to dry in fresh air and sun if possible.
Clothing
Educators clothing should be wash daily. Educators should wear aprons or something similar to cover clothing that cannot frequently be washed. Educators should also have a change of clothes available in case of accidents. Dress-up and play clothes should be washed once a week in hot water and detergent.


 

Toy Cleaning
Educators will regularly clean the children’s equipment and toys. Toys, especially in the rooms of the younger children, are to be washed daily so as to avoid the spread of disease. Educators will wash a toy immediately if it has been sneezed on, mouthed, soiled or if it has been discarded after play by a child who has been unwell. The service will have washable toys for the younger children.
Refer to the following toy cleaning schedule for toys on display in the children’s rooms.
Recommended cleaning materials:
Please use child friendly cleaners such as Bicarb, vinegar diluted 1:10 in water, tea tree, lavender or eucalyptus oil diluted 5 drops to 500ml water, lemon juice or plain water. Please rinse in water after cleaning.
Other items that may be necessary include a sponge cloth, an old toothbrush or cotton wool.
General:

  • Most toys can be washed with normal dishwashing liquid, rinsing with clean water.
  • Get into corners with a toothbrush. Please dry well.
  • Leaving items such as LEGO and construction blocks to drain on a clean tea-towel overnight is ideal.

Wooden Toys:

  • Should be wiped over with a damp cloth – please do not immerse in water.

Play Dough
Service will reduce the risk of the spread of disease when playing with play dough by:

  • Encouraging hand washing before and after using play dough
  • Storing the play dough in a sealed container in the refrigerator between uses
  • Making a new batch of play dough each week, and
  • If there is an outbreak of vomiting and/or diarrhoea, discarding the play dough at the end of each day during the outbreak.

Rattles and Baby Toys:

  • Must not be immersed in water as it can get inside, rendering the toy useless.
  • Wipe thoroughly with hot water or a cloth with diluted vinegar.

Ride-on Vehicles and Outdoor Toys:

  • Must be cleaned.
  • Please take care not leave them exposed to the elements as this reduces their lifespan.

Puzzles and Games:

  • Wooden puzzles as per 'Wooden Toys' above.
  • Cardboard should be wiped over with a slightly damp cloth.

Packaging:
Please help us by:

  • Packing small pieces in bags provided. This makes them easier to count when returned
  • Using elastic bands to contain similar items (like railway tracks).
  • Completing puzzles before returning where practical.
  • Alerting Volunteers to plastic bags which may be deteriorating.

Sun Protection

It’s important to have a healthy balance of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure. Too much of the sun’s UV can cause sunburn, skin and eye damage and skin cancer. Overexposure to UV during childhood and adolescence is a major factor in determining future skin cancer risk. Too little UV from the sun can lead to low vitamin D levels. Vitamin D is necessary for the development and maintenance of healthy bones and muscles, and for general health.
This SunSmart Policy has been developed to:

  • Ensure all children and educators get some UV for vitamin D.
  • Encourage children and educators to use a combination of sun protection measures whenever UV Index levels reach 3 and above to minimise skin and eye damage and skin cancer risk.
  • Work towards a safe outdoor environment that provides shade for children and educators at appropriate times.
  • Assist children to be responsible for their own sun protection.
  • Ensure that families and new educators are informed of the service’s sun protection policy.

Educators are encouraged to access the SunSmart UV Alert at sunsmart.com.au to find out daily local sun protection times to assist with the implementation of this policy.
We use a combination of sun protection measures for all outdoor activities from September to the end of April and whenever UV levels reach 3 and above, the level that can damage skin and eyes.
Our SunSmart practises consider the special needs of infants. All babies under 12 months are kept out of direct sun when UV levels are three and above.
1. Shade

  • A shade audit is conducted regularly to determine the current availability and quality of shade.
  • Management makes sure there is a sufficient number of shelters and trees providing shade in the outdoor area.
  • The availability of shade is considered when planning excursions and all other outdoor activities.
  • Children are encouraged to use available areas of shade when outside.
  • Children who do not have appropriate hats or outdoor clothing are asked to play in the shade or a suitable area protected from the sun.

2. Clothing

  • When outside, children are required to wear loose fitting clothing that covers as much skin as possible. Clothing made from cool, densely woven fabric is recommended. Tops with elbow length sleeves, and if possible, collars and knee length or longer style shorts and skirts are best. If a child is wearing a singlet top or dress they wear a t-shirt/ shirt over the top before going outdoors.

3. Hats

  • All children are required to wear hats that protect their face, neck and ears, i.e. legionnaire, broad brimmed or bucket hats. Baseball or peak caps are not considered a suitable alternative.

4. Sunglasses [OPTIONAL]

  • Children and educators are encouraged to wear close fitting, wrap-around sunglasses that meet the Australian Standard 1067 (Sunglasses: Category 2, 3 or 4) and cover as much of the eye area as possible.

5. Sunscreen

  • SPF 30+ broad spectrum, water resistant sunscreen is available for educators and children's use.
  • Sunscreen is applied at least 20 minutes before going outdoors and reapplied every two hours if outdoors.
  • With parental consent, children with naturally very dark skin are not required to wear sunscreen to help with vitamin D requirements.
  • From 3 years of age, children are encouraged to apply their own sunscreen under the supervision of educators.

Staff OHS and Role modelling
As part of OHS UV risk controls and role-modelling, when the UV is 3 and above educators:

  • wear sun protective hats, clothing and sunglasses when outside
  • apply SPF 30+ broad spectrum, water resistant sunscreen
  • seek shade whenever possible

Families and visitors are requested to use a combination of sun protection measures (sun protective clothing and hats, shade, sunglasses and sunscreen) when attending the service.

Planned experiences

  • Programs on sun protection and vitamin D are incorporated into planned experiences.
  • The SunSmart strategy is reinforced through educators' and children's activities and displays.
  • Educators and families are provided with information on sun protection and vitamin D through family newsletters, noticeboards and meetings.

Delivery and Collection of Children
The following procedure must be adhered to at all times to ensure the safety of the children.
Arrival:

  • All children must be signed inby their parent or person who delivers the child to our service. If the parent or other person forgets to sign the child in they will be signed in by the nominated supervisor or an educator.
  • An educator will greet and receive each child to ensure the child is cared for at all times.
  • A locker or shelf space will be made available to children and their families. A sign is posted above the lockers nominating a symbol for each child.

Departure:

  • All children must be signed outby their parent or person who collects the child from our service. If the parent or other person forgets to sign the child out they will be signed out by the nominated supervisor or an educator.
  • Children can only be collected by a parent, an authorised nominee named on their enrolment record, or a person authorised by a parent or authorised nominee to collect the child.
  • Children will not be released into the care of persons not authorised to collect the child e.g. court orders concerning custody and access.
  • Nominated Supervisors will ensure that the authorised nominee pick-up list for each child is kept up to date. It is our policy that we do not allow anyone under the age of 16 to collect children.
  • No child will be released into the care of anyone not known to educators. Parents must give prior notice where:
    • the person collecting the child is someone other than those mentioned on the enrolment form (eg in an emergency) or
    • there is a variation in the persons picking up the child, including where the child is collected by an authorised nominee who is unknown to educators.

If educators do not know the person by appearance, the person must be able to produce some photo identification. If educators cannot verify the person’s identity they may be unable to release the child into that person’s care.

  • If the person collecting the child appears to be intoxicated, or under the influence of drugs, and educators feel that the person is unfit to take responsibility for the child, educators will:
    • discuss their concerns with the person, if possible without the child being present
    • suggest they contact another parent or authorised nominee to collect the child.
    • educators will inform the police of the circumstances, the person’s name and vehicle registration number if the person insists on taking the child. Educators cannot prevent an incapacitated parent from collecting a child, but must consider their obligations under the relevant child protection laws.
  • At the end of each day educators will check all beds and the premises including outdoors and indoors to ensure that no child remains on the premises after the service closes.
  • Children may leave the premises in the event of an emergency, including medical emergencies.
  • Details of absences during the day will be recorded.

To ensure we can meet Work Health and Safety requirements and ensure the safety of our children, individuals visiting our service must sign in when they arrive at the service, and sign out when they leave.

 

Water Safety

To stop accidents and illnesses relating to swimming pools, wading pools, water troughs and other water situations our servicewill:

  • Remove any items or objects that could be used to climb into the fenced area of a pool, trough, or water storage unit e.g. chairs, bins, bikes, any overhanging trees.
  • Make sure no child swims in any water without:
    • Written permission from family member to learn water safety and swimming.
    • Appropriate educators/child ratios in place
    • Having sufficient numbers of educators present who have first aid or recognised water safety and rescue procedures.
  • At all times children near water are closely supervised. A child will never be left unattended near any water, and two educators must supervise if children are using a paddling pool/water trough.
  • Display a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) guide near any water.
  • Ensure that all water containers, e.g. pond’s, spas, nappy buckets, bathtubs are covered or made inaccessible to children and also make sure children’s play areas are safely fenced off from water hazards such as rivers, dams, creeks, lakes, irrigation channels, wells etc.
  • Immediately empty all wading pools/water troughs etc. after every use, storage should prevent the collection of water e.g. upright/inverted, also check grounds after rain or watering and empty water that has collected in holes or containers.
  • Ensure wading/water trough are hygienically cleaned, disinfected and chlorinated appropriately:
    • On a daily basis remove leaves and debris, hose away surface dirt and scrub inside with disinfectant.
    • Wash away disinfectant before filling pool/trough.
    • Add Chlorine to pool before children used the pool.
    • Check chlorine levels frequently.
    • Children with diarrhoea, upset stomach, open sores or nasal infections should not use the pool.
    • All children should wear appropriate bathers, go to the toilet before entering the pool, and follow correct toileting hygiene practices while in the pool.
    • Remove all children immediately, empty and disinfect the pool should a child pass a bowel motion whilst in the pool.

Kitchens

  • Children must not gain access to any harmful substance, equipment or amenity
  • The kitchen has a door, half-gate or other barrier to prevent unsupervised entry by children into the kitchen.
  • The preparation of bottles for children under the age of 2 years is both safe and hygienic at all times and separate from nappy change area.

 

Inspection and testing of electrical equipment

Victoria is in the process of considering new national Work Health and Safety laws.
Under the new laws, services must ensure that electrical equipment is regularly inspected and tested by a competent person if the electrical equipment is supplied with electricity through an electrical socket and used in conditions where it could be damaged, including exposure to moisture, heat, vibration, mechanical damage, corrosive chemicals or dust. A record of the testing, which may be a tag attached to the equipment tested, must be kept until the equipment is next tested or disposed of and must specify:

  • the name of the tester
  • the date and outcome of the testing
  • the date on which the next testing must be carried out.

 

Maintenance of Fire Equipment

All fire equipment at our centre will be maintained as per the legal standards. Our equipment will be checked as required as per the timeframes below.



Key

Inspection Procedure of Fire Safety Installations (F.S.I)

1. Inspect for obvious visual faults.
2. Inspect for faults and witness test of F.S.I by a competent person
3. Inspect for faults where possible and accept logbook details of F.S.I
4. Check Building file for details of any extra requirements.

Required Record of Keeping Fire Safety Installations (F.S.I)

L = log book required
R = record of maintenance required
T = Metal tag on F.S.I or service details/service label
(Y) = Weekly test may be omitted refer AS 1851-2005

Fire Fighting Equipment


Special Fire Service

Inspection Procedures for FSI

Required Record Keeping for FSI

Maintenance Schedule

Annual Survey of Installation

Maintenance Standard or Building Preference

Wk

Mth

3Mth

6Mth

12Mth

3Yr

5yr

Fire Mains

1

 

 

 

 

Y

Y

Y

 

 

1851-Section 2 & 4

Fire Hydrants (including internal & external hydrants, boosters connection/s and water storage tanks

2

L-T

 

 

 

Y

Y

 

Y

Y

1851- Section 4

Fire Pumpsets

2

L-T

(Y)

Y

 

Y

Y

 

Y

Y

1852 – Section 3

Fire Hose Reels

2

R-T

 

 

 

Y

Y

 

 

Y

1851- Section 14

Fire Extinguishers (Portable)

2

R-T

 

 

 

Y

Y

 

Y

Y

1851- Section 15

External agencies will be employed to assist the centre with this maintenance if no currently employed staff or educators are qualified to complete the maintenance checks.


Back Care and Manual Handling

Remember:

  • Manual handling means any activity requiring the use of force exerted by the individual to lift, lower, push, pull, carry or otherwise move, hold or restrain any individual or object.
  • Manual handling injuries may be caused by the above activities listed above. Injuries can include back strains, similar strains and sprains in parts of the body such as the neck, arm, shoulder and knee.
  • Manual handling injuries also encompass overuse injuries or, as a result of falling during manual handling, bruising or laceration.

 

Recommendations:

  • As working with children is physically demanding, it is wise to do warm-up exercises for three to five minutes before starting work. This is particularly important during cold periods as muscles and tendons are more likely to be damaged when cold. Simple exercises to warm and stretch all the major muscle groups will help prevent injury.
  • In addition, regular exercise such as walking, tennis, golf or aerobics will help condition muscles but anyone with neck, back or muscular problems should see a doctor before exercising.
  • To help prevent injuries, there are legal requirements for manual handling in the workplace.

The employer, in consultation with staff/educators will:

  • Provide you annually with training in Manual Handling and Back Care.
  • Display in the staff room written information regarding manual handling and any updates as required.
  • Make sure that equipment and containers are designed and maintained to be, as far as workable, safe and without risk to health and safety when manually handled.
  • Make sure that the work practices involving manual handling and the work environment are designed to be, as far as workable, consistent with safe manual handling activities.
  • Identify, assess and control all risks associated with manual handling in each workplace.
  • Clearly mark any equipment which requires more than one individual to lift or move it.

 

Principles of Preventing Manual Handling Injuries

  • Eliminate or reduce the amount of manual handling.
  • Reduce the amount of bending, forward reaching, and twisting, in all tasks.
  • Reduce worker fatigue.
  • Keep all equipment in good working order.
  • Keep the workplace environment safe.

 

To help prevent manual handling injuries:

  • Kneel down rather than bend down.
  • For example, helping a child to put their shoes on.
  • Sit down rather than bend.
  • For example, if a child needs comforting, sit down on the floor and encourage the child to sit on your lap.
  • Sit in an appropriate sized chair or on the floor.
  • A suitable chair allows an adult to sit with upper legs horizontal to hips and feet flat on the floor.
  • Carry children only when necessary.
  • The correct way to carry a child is with one arm under the child’s buttocks and the other arm supporting the child’s back. At the same time, hold the child facing you, as close to your body as possible.
  • Adults should try to avoid carrying a child on their hip because this can strain the back.
  • When lifting awkward loads, be careful to lift with a balanced and comfortable posture.
  • Minimise the need to reach above shoulder level.
  • If necessary use a step ladder.
  • Avoid extended reaching forward,
  • For example, leaning into low equipment boxes.
  • Share the load if the equipment is heavy, long or awkward.
  • To lift a child out of a cot, lean against the cot and raise the child as close as possible to your body. Do not stretch over and lift.
  • When sliding, pulling or pushing equipment that is not easy to move, e.g. trestles or gym mats, ask for help and organise a team lift.
  • Where possible, rearrange surroundings to meet the needs of both children and adults.

Remember these needs when buying furniture and equipment or upgrading facilities.

  • Use equipment and furniture that can be moved around as safely and easily as possible.
  • To complete lengthy writing tasks, e.g. program planning, sit at an appropriate adult sized chair at an adult sized table.
  • Larger children to climb up steps/ladder provided to change table.

Avoid Twisting when Lifting
Many injuries result from twisting while lifting. To avoid this:

  • Move equipment when children are not around.
  • Rearrange storage so that it is easier and safer to replace and remove items.
  • Lift only within the limits of your strength.
  • Use beds and equipment that are easy to move.
  • Make sure you can see where you are going when carrying equipment or children.
  • Be especially careful when lifting a child with special needs.

Avoid Accidents with Careful Housekeeping
Good housekeeping means fewer accidents. Check that:

  • The floors and other walking surfaces are uncluttered, even and non-slippery.
  • The workplace is tidy.
  • There is adequate space to perform each task.
  • Equipment is maintained regularly.
  • Lighting is adequate.

 

How to Lift Safely

  • Place your feet in a stride position.
  • Keep your breastbone as elevated as possible.
  • Bend your knees.
  • Brace your stomach muscles.
  • Hold the object close to your centre of gravity, i.e. around your navel.
  • Move your feet not your spine.
  • Prepare to move in a forward-facing direction
  • Ask for help when it is not possible to lift on your own.

How to Organise a Team Lift.

  • Ask a colleague who is willing and able to help.

Ideally the colleague should be fairly well matched with you in size and strength.

  • Agree on a plan of action.
    A coordinated movement during a lift is important.
  • Timing is important for co-ordination.

One individual should act as a team leader and ‘call’ the lift.

How to Assess the Correct Storage and Shelving Height
Correct storage and shelving height is important to prevent slips, falls and strains:

To check the height at which it is safest for each individual to work, stand with feet together and hands by sides:

  • The best height range for handling loads is around waist level .
  • The acceptable height for lifting is any point between the individual’s knuckle and shoulder.
  • Seldom-used objects can be stored at the shoulder-to-raised arm height (use ladders to avoid stretching).
  • Avoid storing objects at a level between an individual’s knuckles and the floor.
  • Mechanical aids such as ladders and trolleys should be used where possible to avoid lifting.

 

Sources
Australian Standards 1851-2005 “Maintenance of Fire Protection Systems and Equipment”
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Early Years Learning Framework
National Quality Standard
Occupational Health & Safety Act 2004
Cancer Council VIC Sample Sun Protection Policy

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Reviewed: 18/04/2013 Date for next review: 18/04/2014

Policy and Procedure Review Policy

Aim
As a part of our commitment to the National Quality Framework (NQF), our service will annually review our policies and procedures to ensure excellence and compliance. Our review processes also provides an important opportunity for families to offer their valuable input into the practices at the service and how best to meet the needs of each child being educated and cared for.

NQS

QA4

4.2

Educators, co-ordinators and educators are respectful and ethical.

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

4.2.2

Educators, co-ordinators and educators work collaboratively and affirm, challenge, support and learn from each other to further develop their skills, to improve practice and relationships.

4.2.3

Interactions convey mutual respect, equity and recognition of each other’s strengths and skills.

QA7

7.2.3

An effective self-assessment and quality improvement process is in place.

7.3.2

Administrative systems are established and maintained to ensure the effective operation of the service.

7.3.5

Service practices are based on effectively documented policies and procedures that are available at the service and reviewed regularly.

National Regulations

Regs

31

Condition on service approval - quality improvement plan

55-56

Quality improvement plans

168

Education and care service must have policies and procedures

170

Policies and procedures to be followed

171

Policies and procedures to be kept available

172

Notification of change to policies or procedures affecting ability of family to utilise service


Related Policies
All Policies used by the Service


Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Educators
Families
Management


Implementation

  • All policies and procedures will be made available to families during the enrolment and orientation period for their child.
  • Educators will notify families of how to access policies and procedures and where they are located in the service.
  • Our educators will ensure that all policies and procedures are reviewed annually or more often if required. This gives both families and educators opportunities to suggest elements that need to be improved.
  • For educators and management this will occur:
    • At educators meetings.
    • At the policy review points.
    • In family meeting.
  • For families this will occur:
    • Via newsletters.
    • At the policy review point.
    • At parent/educators meeting.
  • However, at any time of the year educators and family members are invited to enquire and have input into the policies and procedures.
  • All policies will be signed, sourced and dated at each review and educators will continuously seek out relevant information to provide the best possible environment.
  • All stakeholders at the service must be informed of any changes to policies. This will occur in writing and be provided to families, educators, management, the committee and any other relevant individuals.
  • The service will ensure that parents of children enrolled at the service are notified at least 14 days before making any change to a policy or procedure that may have a significant impact on—

(a) the service's provision of education and care to any child enrolled at the service; or
(b) the family's ability to utilise the service
(c) the fees charged or the way in which fees are collected.
If a proposed change to policies or procedures will pose a risk to the health or safety of any children enrolled at the service, the service will ensure that parents are notified as soon as possible.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:
Management
Employees
Families
Interested Parties

Privacy and Confidentiality Policy

NQS


QA4

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

QA5

5.2.3

The dignity and the rights of every child are maintained at all times

QA7

7.1.1

Appropriate governance arrangements are in place to manage the service

National Regulations


Regs

181

Confidentiality of records kept by approved provider

181-184

Confidentiality and storage of records

Aim

Privacy Statement

Our service recognises that every individual has the right to ensure their personal information is accurate and secure, and only used or disclosed to achieve the outcomes for which it was initially collected. Personal information will be managed openly and transparently in a way that protects an individual’s privacy and respects their rights under Australian privacy laws.

Related Policies

Educator and Management Policy
Record Keeping and Retention Policy
Social Media Policy

Implementation

Our Privacy Notice and Disclosure Statement are at the end of this Policy.
Our Service practices are consistent with the Australian Privacy Principles.

Collection of personal information

We collect personal information if it is necessary for us to carry out Service operations or to comply with our legal obligations. This includes information required to comply with the National Education and Care Law and Regulations and to promote learning under the Early Years Learning Framework. Information may also be collected to comply with other Laws including State or Territory Health Laws.

During the enrolment process the Nominated Supervisor will:

  • Explain what personal information we need to collect, why we need to collect it, whether the information is required or authorised by Law and how it may be shared.

Personal information includes name, address, date of birth, gender, family contact details, emergency contact details, authorised nominee details, parents’ occupations, cultural background, home language, religious beliefs, payment details, child care benefit information, immunisation records, medical information, medical management plans, photos of children and family members and information about children’s strengths, interests, preferences and needs, including special needs. Personal information also includes “government related identifiers” like Medicare numbers and CCB references.

  • advise families about our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy and how to access it.
  • attach a copy of our Privacy Notice to our Enrolment Form and other forms we use to collect personal information.
  • verbally advise children’s emergency contacts and authorised nominees that we have some of their personal information on file and explain the advice in the Privacy Notice.
  • explain the advice in the Privacy Notice to individuals who provide personal information verbally (eg by phone).

We usually collect personal information directly from a parent or guardian either in writing or verbally, for example during enrolment, when completing waiting list applications, or as we establish a partnership with families in caring for and educating a child. We may also collect information through our website, social media page, Family Law court orders or agreements, special needs agencies and training courses.
We may occasionally request information from other organisations which you would reasonably agree is necessary for us to educate and care for a child. For example, we may request a copy of a child’s immunisation records where they are transferring to us from another Service, or where we request information about a child from a special needs educator or organisation. We will not request information without obtaining the consent of the individual (or parent) concerned.
In most cases, if we are unable to collect relevant personal information, we will be unable to enrol a child at the Service.
The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will advise individuals about any unsolicited personal information we receive from other organisations and keep because it is directly related to our functions and activities (unless we are advised not to by a Government authority). The Nominated Supervisor will destroy any unsolicited personal information that is not directly related to our Service operations unless it adversely impacts the health, safety and wellbeing of a child or children at the service. If this happens the Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will contact the appropriate Government authorities and take action as directed while protecting the confidentiality of the individuals concerned.

 Use or disclosure of personal information

We will not use personal information for any purpose that is not reasonably needed for the proper or effective operation of the service. Personal information may be accessed by and exchanged with staff educating and caring for a child or by administrative staff.
We do not disclose your personal information to others unless you would have reasonably expected us to do this or we have your consent. For example, personal information may be disclosed to:

  • emergency service personnel so they can provide medical treatment in an emergency
  • special needs educators or inclusion support agencies
  • volunteers, trainees and work experience students (with consent)
  • trainers or presenters if children participate in special learning activities
  • organisations related to the Service (eg other Services)
  • another Service to which a child is transferring where you have consented to the transfer.
  • the new operator of the Service if we sell our business and you have consented to the transfer of enrolment and other documents listed in Regulation 177 of the National Education and Care Regulations.

We may disclose personal information where we are permitted or obliged to do so by an Australian law. For example, personal information may be disclosed to:

  • authorised officers when our service is assessed and rated under the National Education and Care Law and Regulations
  • Government employees (eg for CCB, Immunisation, Medicare purposes)
  • software companies that provide child care management systems
  • management companies we may engage to administer the Service
  • software companies that provide tailored computer based educational tools for children
  • lawyers in relation to a legal claim.
  • officers carrying out an external dispute resolution process
  • a debt collection company we use to recover outstanding fees
  • authorities if we are taking action in relation to unlawful activity, serious misconduct, or to reduce or prevent a serious threat to life, health or safety.

We do not disclose personal information to any person or organisation overseas or for any direct marketing purposes.

Quality of personal information

The Nominated Supervisor will take reasonable steps to ensure the personal information we collect, use and disclose is accurate, current and complete. Educators and staff will:

  • view original sources of information if practical when information is collected.
  • collect and record personal information in a consistent format, for example using templates for enrolment, incident, injury, trauma and illness and administration of medication.
  • record the date personal information was collected or updated.
  • update information in our physical or electronic records as soon as it’s provided.

In addition the Nominated Supervisor will:

  • regularly remind families via newsletters, emails or through displays on the Service notice board to update their personal information including emergency contact details and their child’s health information.
  • ask parents to update their enrolment details annually, or whenever their circumstances change.
  • verify the information is accurate, current and complete before disclosing it to any external organisation or person.
  • ensure documentation about children and families is based on facts and free from prejudice.

Security of personal information

The Nominated Supervisor will take reasonable steps to protect personal information from misuse, interference and loss, unauthorised access, modification or disclosure. These steps include:

  • taking responsibility for the security of personal information and regularly checking the practices implemented to protect it. This will include management of access privileges to ensure only people who genuinely need to see personal information can access it.
  • ensuring information technology systems have appropriate security measures including password protection, anti-virus and ‘malware’ software, and data backup systems.
  • ensuring physical repositories of personal information are secure in the Nominated Supervisor’s Office in a filing cabinet which is locked when a Responsible Person is not present.
  • ensuring all educators and staff are aware of their obligations in relation to the collection, use and disclosure of personal information, through activities like mentoring, staff meetings or on-line training courses.
  • requiring all educators, staff, volunteers and work experience students to sign a ‘Confidentiality Statement’ acknowledging that personal information:
    • can only be accessed if it is necessary for them to complete their job
    • cannot be disclosed to other organisations (including colleges, RTOs) or discussed with individuals outside the service including personal family members unless they have written consent from the person (or parent) concerned.
    • must be stored in compliance with service practices which safeguard its security.
  • ensuring records which we don’t need to keep, including unsuccessful job applications and records which fall outside the record keeping timeframes under the National Education and Care Law and Regulations (refer to our Record Keeping and Retention Policy) are destroyed in a secure way as soon as possible by, for example, shredding, incinerating or permanently deleting electronic records including archived or back-up copies. Where possible, the destruction of records containing personal information will be overseen by two staff members.
  • ‘de-identifying’ personal information so that people (eg our accountant) who require the information may access it without being able to identify individuals. We will do this by appointment with the nominated supervisor.
  • ‘de-identifying’ personal information which may come into the public domain. For example, removing identifying names or details from newsletters etc.
  • ensuring staff comply with our Social Media Policy (for example by obtaining authorisation from a child’s parents before posting any photos of their child on the Service social media page, and not posting personal information on any social media page which could identify children or families.)
  • ensuring confidential conversations with parents or with staff are conducted in a quiet area away from other children, parents and staff.

Access to personal information

Individuals may request access to their (or their child’s) personal information and may request the correction of any errors. These requests may be made to the Nominated Supervisor by telephone on 5977 8000 or email info@somervillechildcare.com.au or by mail 18-20 Gomms Road, Somerville.
Personal information will be provided as soon as possible, and no later than 30 days from a request. We will provide the information in the form requested, for example by email, phone, in person, hard copy or electronic record unless it is unreasonable or impractical to do this for example due to the volume or nature of the information.
The Nominated Supervisor will always verify a person’s identity before providing access to the information, and ensure someone remains with the individual to ensure information is not changed or removed without our knowledge.

There is no charge for making a request to access the information. However, we may charge a reasonable cost for staff, postage and material expenses if the information is not readily available and retrieving the information takes a lot of time. We will advise you of the cost and get your agreement before we proceed.

There may be rare occasions when we are unable to provide access because we believe:

  • giving access would be unlawful, the information relates to unlawful activity or serious misconduct, or it may prejudice the activities of a law enforcement body.
  • there is a serious threat to life, health or safety.
  • giving access would unreasonably affect the privacy of others.
  • the request is frivolous or vexatious, for example to harass staff.
  • the information relates to legal proceedings (eg unfair dismissal claim) between the Service and the individual.
  • giving access would reveal sensitive information about a commercial decision.

We may, however, provide the information in an alternative way for example by:

  • deleting any personal information which cannot be provided
  • providing a summary of the information
  • giving access to the information in an alternative format
  • allowing the individual to inspect a hard copy of the information and letting them take notes.

We will advise you promptly in writing if we are unable to provide access to the information, or access in the format requested. The advice will include the reasons for the refusal to provide the information (unless it is unreasonable to do this) and information about how to access our grievance procedure.

Correction of personal information

Individuals have a right to request the correction of any errors in their personal information. These requests may be made to the Nominated Supervisor by telephone on 5977 8000 or email info@somervillechildcare.com.au or by mail 18-20 Gomms Road Somerville.

The Nominated Supervisor will take reasonable steps to correct personal information that is inaccurate, out of date, incomplete, irrelevant or misleading as soon as it is available. The Approved Nominated Supervisor will:

  • take reasonable steps to ensure information supplied by an individual is correct.
  • verify the identity of an individual requesting the correction of personal information.
  • notify other organisations about the correction if this is relevant, reasonable or practical.
  • advise the individual about the correction to their information if they are not aware.
  • if immediately unable to correct an individual’s personal information, explain what additional information or explanation is required and/or why we cannot immediately act on the information provided.
  • if unable to correct the information, include reasons for this (for example we believe it’s current) and inform the individual about our grievance procedure and their right to include a statement with the information saying they believe it to be inaccurate, out-of-date, incomplete, irrelevant or misleading.
  • correct the information, or include a statement if requested, as soon as possible.

We will not charge you for making a request to correct their personal information or for including a statement with your personal information.

Complaints

If you believe we have breached Privacy Laws or our Privacy Policy may lodge a complaint with the Nominated Supervisor by telephone on 5977 8000 or email info@somervillechildcxare.com.au or by mail 18-20 Gomms Road, Somerville. The Nominated Supervisor will follow the Service’s grievance procedure to investigate the complaint. Individuals who are unhappy with the outcome of the investigation may raise their complaint with the Office Australian Information Commissioner www.oaic.gov.au GPO Box 5218 Sydney NSW 2001 or GPO Box 2999 Canberra ACT 2601, phone 1300 363 992 or email enquiries@oaic.gov.au.

Child’s Individual Portfolio’s

Children’s individual portfolio’s are available for both parents & children to access at any-time on request. Parent’s and children must ask an educator prior to accessing the portfolio to ensure confidentiality is maintained. Parents & children are only able to view their own or own child’s portfolio.

Sources

National Quality Standard
Education and Care Services National Regulation

Privacy Act 1988 (includes Australian Privacy Principles)
United Nations Convention of the Rights of a Child

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Reviewed: 31.3.2014 Date for next review: 31.3.2015


Disclosure Statement

We will not use personal information for any purpose that is not reasonably needed for the proper or effective operation of the service. Personal information may be accessed by and exchanged with staff educating and caring for a child or by administrative staff.
We do not disclose your personal information to others unless you would have reasonably expected us to do this or we have your consent. For example, personal information may be disclosed to:

  • emergency service personnel where this is necessary to provide medical treatment in an emergency
  • special needs educators or inclusion support agencies
  • volunteers, trainees and work experience students (with consent)
  • trainers or presenters if children participate in special learning activities
  • organisations related to the Service (eg other Services)
  • another Service to which a child is transferring where you have consented to the transfer.
  • the new operator of the Service if we sell our business and you have consented to the transfer of enrolment and other documents listed in Regulation 177 of the National Education and Care Regulations.

We may disclose personal information where we are permitted or obliged to do so by an Australian law. For example, personal information may be disclosed to:

  • authorised officers when our service is assessed and rated under the National Education and Care Law and Regulations
  • Government employees (eg for CCB, Immunisation, Medicare purposes)
  • software companies that provide child care management systems
  • management companies we may engage to administer the Service
  • software companies that provide computer based educational tools which use a child’s personal information.
  • lawyers in relation to a legal claim
  • officers carrying out an external dispute resolution process
  • a debt collection company we use to recover outstanding fees
  • react to unlawful activity, serious misconduct, or to reduce or prevent a serious threat to life, health or safety. We are obliged to cooperate with law enforcement bodies in some circumstances.

Privacy Notice

Personal information will be managed openly and transparently in a way that protects an individual’s privacy and respects their rights under Australian privacy laws.
We only collect or use personal information if this is needed to education and care to children at the service, or to comply with our legal obligations. We will take reasonable steps to make sure you know we have your personal information, how we got it and how we'll handle it.

We collect most personal information directly from a parent or guardian. We may also collect information through our website, social media page, Family Law court orders or agreements, special needs agencies and training courses. We may occasionally request information from other organisations which you would reasonably agree is necessary for us to educate and care for a child.

The information collected includes information required under the National Education and Care Law and Regulations or needed to promote learning under the Early Years Learning Framework. This includes name, address, date of birth, gender, family contact details, emergency contact details, authorised nominee details, parents’ occupations, cultural background, home language, religious beliefs, payment details, child care benefit information, Medicare number, , immunisation records, medical information and medical management plans, photos of children and information about children’s strengths, interests, preferences and needs, including special needs.
We do not disclose personal information to others unless you would reasonably expect us to do this, we have your consent or we are complying with an Australian law.

We aim to keep the personal information we hold accurate, up-to-date and complete. This enables us to provide high quality education and care while ensuring the health and safety of children, and it is also important that we can contact you in the event of an emergency.

We have systems and practices in place to ensure personal information is secure and can only be accessed by those who need the information or may legally access it.

You have the right to access your personal information. There are some circumstances under Australian privacy laws where we may not be able to give you access. We will tell you if this is the case. There is generally no cost for accessing your information. We will tell you if there is a charge before providing access.
Our Privacy Officer for privacy matters, including complaints, is the Nominated Supervisor who may be contacted by telephone on 5977 8000 or email info@somervillechildcare.com.au or by mail 18-20 Gomms Road, Somerville.
We will provide a copy of any updates to our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy on our Service Noticeboard and include the changes in our Newsletter.

Record Keeping and Retention Policy

NQS

QA4

4.1.1

Educator-to-child ratios and qualification requirements are maintained at all times.

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

4.2.2

Educators, co-ordinators and staff members work collaboratively and affirm, challenge, support and learn from each other to further develop their skills, to improve practice and relationships

4.2.3

Interactions convey mutual respect, equity and recognition of each other’s strengths and skills

QA7

7.3.1

Records and information are stored appropriately to ensure confidentiality, are available from the service and are maintained in accordance with legislative requirements.

7.3.2

Administrative systems are established and maintained to ensure the effective operation of the service.

7.3.3

The Regulatory Authority is notified of any relevant changes to the operation of the service, of serious incidents and any complaints

National Regulations

Reg

55

Quality improvement plans

125

Application of Division 4

126

Centre-based services – general educator qualifications

158

Children’s attendance record is to be kept by approved provider

161

Authorisations to be kept in enrolment record

162

Health information to be kept in enrolment record

167

Record of service’s compliance

173

Prescribed information to be displayed

177

Prescribed enrolment and other documents to be kept by approved provider

180

Evidence of prescribed insurance

181

Confidentiality of records kept by approved provider

183

Storage of records and other documents

184

Storage of records after service approval transferred


Aim
To ensure that our service maintains appropriate records in line with our regulatory requirements.


Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Administration of Authorised Medication Policy
Enrolment Policy
HIV AIDS Policy
Immunisation and Disease Prevention Policy
Infectious Diseases Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Children
Families
Educators

Implementation
Records to be Kept in Relation to Staff
The following records must be kept in relation to the service’s Nominated Supervisors:

  • The full name, address and date of birth.
  • Evidence of any relevant qualifications held by the Nominated Supervisor.
  • If applicable, evidence that the Nominated Supervisor is actively working towards that qualification. If this is the case, the following must be recorded:
    • Proof of enrolment.
    • Documentary evidence that the Nominated Supervisor has commenced the course, is making satisfactory progress towards the completion of the course, is meeting the requirements of maintaining the enrolment.
    • For Nominated Supervisors who are working towards the completion of a Diploma level education and care qualification, proof that they hold an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification or has completed the units of study in an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification determined by ACECQA.
  • Evidence of any approved training (including first aid training) completed by the Supervisor.
  • If applicable, a Working with Children Check.

The following records must be kept in relation to other staff members:

  • The full name, address and date of birth.
  • Evidence of any relevant qualifications.
  • If applicable, evidence that the staff member is actively working towards that qualification. If this is the case, the following must be recorded:
    • Proof of enrolment.
    • Documentary evidence that the staff member has commenced the course, is making satisfactory progress towards the completion of the course, is meeting the requirements of maintaining the enrolment.
    • For staff members who are working towards the completion of a Diploma level education and care qualification, proof that they hold an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification or has completed the units of study in an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification determined by ACECQA.
  • Evidence of any approved training (including first aid training) completed by the staff member.
  • If applicable, a Working with Children Check.

The following records must be kept in relation to the Educational Leader:

  • The name of the educator who is designated at this role.

The following records must be kept in relation to Students and Volunteers:

  • The full name, address and date of birth of each student or volunteer.
  • The Approved Provider must also keep a record for each day on which the student or volunteer participates in the service, the date and hours of participation.

The following records must be kept in relation to the Responsible Person:

  • The staff record must include the name of the responsible individual at the centre-based service for each time that children are being educated and cared for by the service.

The following records will be kept in relation to educators working directly with children:

  • The name of each educator.
  • The hours that each educator works directly with children. Please note that a staff roster or time sheet is sufficient record of this.

The following records will be kept in relation to access to early childhood teacher/s:

  • The approved provider of a centre-based service that provides education and care to fewer than 25 children preschool age or under must ensure that a record is kept of the following:
    • The period that an early childhood teacher is working with the service in accordance with the time frames set out in the Staffing Arrangements Policy.
    • The periods that the early childhood teacher is working directly with children and not working directly with children.
  • The approved provider of a centre-based service that provides education and care to 25 or more children preschool age or under must ensure that a record is kept of the period that an early childhood teacher is in attendance at the service.

Records Relating to Enrolled Children
The following records will be kept in relation to enrolled children:

  • Documentation relating to child assessments or evaluations for delivery of the education program, including:
    • Assessments of the child’s developmental needs, interests, experiences and participation in the education program.
    • Assessments of the child’s progress against the outcomes of the educational program.
  • An Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Record (within Incident, Injury, Trauma and Illness Policy), including:
    • Details of any incident in relation to a child or injury receive by a child or trauma to which a child has been subject while being educated and care for by the service. The following must be included:
      • The name and age of the child.
      • The circumstances leading to the incident, injury or trauma.
      • The time and date the incident occurred, the injury that was received or the child was subjected to the trauma.
    • Details of any illness which becomes apparent while the child is being educated and care for by the service. The following must be included:
      • The name and age of the child.
      • The relevant circumstances surrounding the child becoming ill and any apparent symptoms.
      • The time and date of the apparent onset of the illness.
    • Details of the action taken by the service in relation to any incident, injury, trauma or illness which a child has suffered while being educated and cared for by the service. The following must be included:
      • Any medication administered or first aid provided.
      • Any medical personnel contacted.
    • Details of any individual who witness the incident, injury or trauma
    • The name of any individual who the education and care service notified or attempted to notify of any incident, injury trauma or illness a child has suffered at the service and the time and date of the notification and notification attempts.
    • The name and signature of the individual making an entry in the record and the time and date that the entry was made.
    • This record must be recorded as soon as is practicable, but not later than 24 hours after the incident, injury, trauma or onset of illness occurred.
  • A medication record which includes the following:
    • The name of the child
    • The authorisation to administer medication (including self-administration is applicable) signed by a parent or an individual named in the child’s enrolment record as authorised to content to administration of medication.
    • The name of the medication to be administered.
    • The time and date the medication was last administered.
    • The time and date or the circumstance under which the medication should be next administered.
    • The dosage of the medication to be administered.
    • The manner in which the medication is to be administered.
    • If the medication is administered to the child:
      • The dosage that was administered.
      • The manner in which the medication was administered.
      • The name and signature of the individual who administered the medication.
      • If another individual is required to check the dosage, the name and signature of that individual.
  • A record of attendance for enrolled children, including:
      • The full name of each child attending the service.
      • The date and time each child arrives and departs.
      • The signature of the individual who delivers the child to the education and care service premises and the signature of the nominated supervisor or an education.
  • Child enrolment records which include the following:
    • The full name, date of birth and address of the child.
    • The name, address and contact details of:
      • Each known parent of the child
      • Any individual who is to be notified of any emergency involving the child if any parent of the child cannot be immediately contacted
      • Any individual who is an authorised nominee
      • Any individual who is authorised to consent to medical treatment of, or to authorise administration of medication to the child.
      • Any individual who is authorised to authorise an educator to take the child outside the education and care service premises.
      • Details of any court orders, parenting orders or parenting plans provided to the approved provider relating to powers, duties, responsibilities or authorities of any individual in relation to the child or access to the child.
      • Details of any other court orders provided to the approved provider relating to the child’s residence or the child’s contact with a parent or other individual.
      • Gender of the child
      • Language used in the child’s home
      • Cultural background of the child and parents (if applicable)
      • Any special considerations for the child (e.g. cultural, religious, dietary requirements or additional needs)
      • Authorisations signed by a parent or a individual named in the enrolment record as authorised to consent to the medical treatment of the or nominated supervisor to seek:
        • Medical treatment for the child from a registered medical practitioner, hospital or ambulance service.
        • Transportation of the child by any ambulance service.
      • Authorisation to take the child on regular outings.
      • The name, address and telephone number or the child’s registered medical practitioner or medical service.
      • The child’s Medicare number if available.
      • Details of any specific healthcare needs of the child including any medication conditions or allergies including whether the child has been diagnosed as at risk of anaphylaxis, including details of any medical management plan.
      • Details of any dietary restrictions for the child
      • The immunisation status of the child
      • A notation that states that a staff member or approved provider has sighted a child’s health record.
    • A record of the services compliance with the law, including:
      • Details of any amendments of the service approval made by the Regulatory Authority including:
        • The reason stated by the Regulatory Authority for the amendment.
        • The date on which the amendment took, or takes, effect
        • The date (if any) that the amendment ceases to have effect.
        • Details of any suspension of the service (other than a voluntary suspension) including:
          • The reason stated by the Regulatory Authority for the suspension.
          • The date on which the suspension took, or takes, effect.
          • The date that the suspension ends.
        • Details of any compliance direction or compliance notice issued to the approved provider in respect of the service, including:
          • The reason stated by the Regulatory Authority for issuing the direction or notice
          • The steps specified in the direction or notice.
          • The date by which the steps specified must be taken.
        • This information must not include any information that identifies any individual other than the approved provider.
        • A record of certified supervisors placed in day to day charge of the education and care service.

The approved provider must ensure that the documents referred to above in relation to a child enrolled at the service are made available to a parent of the child on request. In line with this, if a parent’s access to the kind of information referred to in this documentation is limited by an order of a court, the approved provider must refer to the court order in relation to the release of information concerning the child to that parent.
The record of compliance referred to above must be available for access on request by any individual.
Length of Time Records must be Kept
Our service will keep records for the following periods:

  • If the record relates to an incident, illness, injury or trauma suffered by a child while being educated and cared for by the service, until the child is aged 25 years.
  • If the record relates to an incident, illness, injury of trauma suffered by a child that may have occurred following an incident while being educated and cared for by the service, until the child is aged 25 years.
  • If the record relates to the death of a child while being educated and cared for by the service or that may have occurred as a result of an incident while being educated and cared for, until the end of 7 years after the death.
  • If the case of any other record relating to a child enrolled at the education and care service. Until 3 years after the last date on which the child was educated and cared for by the service.
  • If the record relates to the Approved Provider, until the end of 3 years after the last date on which the approved provider operated the education and care service.
  • If the record relates to the nominated supervisor or staff member of an education and care service, until the end of 3 years after the last date on which the nominated supervisor of staff member provided education and care on behalf of the service.
  • In the case of any other record, 3 years after the date on which the record was made.

Storage of Records
Records made by our service will be stored in a safe and secure location for the relevant time periods as set out above and only made accessible to relevant individuals.
This location is 18-20 Gomms Road, Somerville, 3912
If a service is transferred under the law, documents relating to a child must not be transferred without the express consent of the child’s parents.
Confidentiality and Storage of Records
The approved provider will ensure that information kept in a record is not divulged or communicated through direct or indirect means to another individual other than:

  • The extent necessary for the education and care or medical treatment of the child to whom the information relates.
  • A parent of the child to whom the information relates, except in the case of information kept in a staff record.
  • The Regulatory Authority or an authorised officer.
  • As expressly authorised, permitted or required to be given by or under any Act or law.
  • With the written consent of the individual who provided the information.

Sources
Privacy Act 1988
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Relationships with Children Policy

NQS

QA5

5.1.1

Interactions with each child are warm, responsive and build trusting relationships.

5.1.2

Each child is able to engage with educators in meaningful, open interactions that support the acquisition of skills for life and learning.

5.1.3

Each child is supported to feel secure, confident and included.

5.2.1

Each child is supported to work with, learn from and help others through collaborative learning opportunities.

5.2.2

Each child is supported to manage their own behaviour, respond appropriately to the behaviour of others and communicate effectively to resolve conflicts.

5.2.3

The dignity and the rights of every child are maintained at all times.

National Regulations

Regs

155

Interactions with children

156

Relationships in groups

EYLF

LO1

Children feel safe, secure, and supported.

Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency.

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self identities.

Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect.

LO2

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the
reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation.

Children respond to diversity with respect.

Children become aware of fairness.

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment.

Aim
Our Service aims to ensure that all educators form positive relationships with children that make them feel safe and supported in the Service. Educators will encourage positive relationships between children and their peers as well as with educators and volunteers at the Service.

Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Continuity of Education and Care Policy
Enrolment Policy
Orientation for Children Policy
Physical Activity Promotion Policy

Implementation

Interactions with Children
Our Service’s statement of philosophy will guide our interactions with children as follows:
At Somerville Childcare & Kindergarten we believe that every child has the right to feel safe and secure in an environment that respects and caters for each child and family’s individual needs.

The development of our program reflects the beliefs that: -

  • That each child is different but equal.
  • Family values, beliefs and culture are important.
  • As parents are the first educators their involvement and contribution to the program has value.
  • A child’s gender, race or religion should not inhibit growth and learning opportunities.
  • Play is the most important media through which young children learn.


The program aims to encourage the children to be independent, self confident, enthusiastic learners.

Through quality care and a secure and happy environment the staff:-

  • Will respect each child, helping them to develop their own sense of self worth and self-esteem.
  • Will recognize that children have individual development needs and mature at different paces.
  • Will provide each child with opportunities to problem solve and make their own decisions to develop independence and responsibility for their own actions.
  • photo3
    Will keep developmental records (e.g. anecdotal, a journal of progress in developmental areas, a developmental checklist) on each individual child and use these observations to devise a program and strategies to respond to these individual development needs.
  • Will constantly evaluate the educational program, inviting parent responses to ensure the program reflects centre philosophy and the goals set for the children.
  • Will provide stimulating and challenging experiences to develop confidence in exploring their environment including a variety of mediums and materials, both natural and recyclable.
  • Will provide opportunities and support for children to develop independence and skills in self-help during meal, toileting and rest procedures.

Through messy and clean, noisy and quiet, large group or individual experiences that provide opportunities for fine and gross motor, cognitive and social development, your child will explore and experiment with the environment to find out how things work and about the world they live in. Your child will develop curiosity, the desire to understand and learn and further develop listening, talking and pre-reading skills.

In order to maintain positive interactions with children our service and educators will maintain the following:

  • Our service will provide a relaxed and happy atmosphere for the children.
  • Our service will ensure mealtimes are relaxed and unhurried and educators take the time to sit and talk with children.
  • Our educators will encourage children to initiate conversations about their experiences inside and outside the service as well as what is happening around them, express their ideas and feelings, share humour with the nominated supervisor, educators, coordinators and educators and seek assistance as they take on new challenges and try to do things for themselves.
  • Our educators and coordinators will respond sensitively and appropriately to children’s efforts to communicate and engage them in sustained conversations about their interests in a positive manner.
  • Our educators will talk with children in a two-sided manner. That is, encourage children to have their own opinions, ideas and comments. Educators should support children with this and let them know that their ideas are valued.
  • Our service will have in place predictable personal-care routines that are enjoyable experiences for babies and toddlers and will respond to babies and toddlers when they practice their verbal communication skills.
  • Our routines, as well as planned and spontaneous experiences will be organised to maximise opportunity for meaningful conversations between children and educators and the service will ensure that all children have equal opportunity to engage in one to one and small group conversations with educators.
  • Our educators will be knowledgeable in the communication strategies and non verbal cues of babies and toddlers and staffing and grouping arrangements within the service will support the development of trusting relationships between educators, babies and toddlers to allow them to feel secure in the service.
  • Our statement of philosophy and policy on interactions with children will be visible
  • Our educators will participate in children’s play using children’s cues to guide their level and type of involvement while always maintaining a positive approach when responding to children and offering assistance.
  • Our educators will model reasoning, prediction and reflection processes and language.
  • Our educators will collaborate with children about routines and experiences.
  • Our educators will use techniques such as sign language and other resources and tools to support children with additional needs.
  • Our educators will engage in give and take communication by adding to interactions initiated by babies and toddlers by describing objects and talking about routine activities with babies and toddlers.
  • Our educators will use their interactions with children to support the maintenance of home languages and learning English as an additional language.
  • Our educators and coordinators will use information from their observations of interactions with children to extend the children’s thinking and learning.
  • Our educators will also support children to build secure attachments with one and then many educators and use a favourite toy or comfort item to help them feel secure in the service. Most toddlers suffer a form of separation anxiety when away from their families. Educators need to reassure the toddler and work with the toddler’s family in order to make the child feel safe and happy at the Service.
  • Our service will ensure that there are many opportunities for babies and toddlers to experience relaxed physical contact and close interactions with familiar educators.
  • Our nominated supervisor, educators and coordinators will learn more about the histories, cultures, languages, traditions, child rearing practices and lifestyle choices of families using the service.
  • Our educators will frequently talk with families to get an idea of the non-verbal forms of communication used by their children in order to convey messages such as hunger, needing the toilet, tiredness and emotions.
  • Our educators will allow time to talk to parents about their children. This allows educators to gain insight into their home life.
  • Our service will implement strategies to assist all children to develop a sense of belonging and confidence through positive interactions between the children and educators.
  • Our service’s roster will be planned in a way that promotes continuity for children.
  • Our service will gather information from families in the enrolment form in order to be able to provide support for children during the settling in process.
  • When children have special needs our service will consult with other professionals or support agencies that work with children to gather information that will guide our interactions with these children. This information will be recorded in the child’s file.
  • Our service’s approach to equity and inclusion will be documented in our statement of philosophy.
  • Our service will ensure that educators document the knowledge gained about children, through their interactions, in the child’s file for reference for other educators and will continually review the experiences that are planned for children in light of this information.

Sand Pit Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations

Reg

168

Child safe environment policies and procedures


Aim
To ensure sand pits are clean and safe for all users.

Related Policies
Animal and Pet Policy
Chemical Spills Policy
Incident, Injury, Illness or Trauma Policy
Physical Activity Promotion Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy

Implementation
In order to ensure our sand pit is always a safe and hygienic place for children to play and learn we will:

  • Construct sandpits so that they have adequate drainage.
  • Ensure sand is of a depth that can be easily raked over before each use and during the day.
  • Rake sand pits at regular intervals each day and remove any dangerous or foreign matter such as animal or human faeces and urine which could cause illness or infection in children or educators.
  • Wash the sandpit regularly with tap water if it is not regularly washed by the rain
  • Remove toys from the sandpit at the end of each day.
  • Regularly sanitise sand by raking salt thoroughly through the sand.
  • Carefully remove and dispose of any contaminated sand.
  • Change sand at least annually but preferably every 6 months.
  • Use sand that is appropriate for use in sandpits and meets state regulations
  • Cover sand pits when they are not in use.
  • Ensure children wash their hands with soap and water after playing in the sandpit.

If sand is contaminated by animal or human faeces, blood or other body fluids remove all children from the sandpit and then:

  • Use a shovel and dispose of the contaminated sand in a plastic bag. Educators will wear suitable protective clothing.
  • Wash remaining sand thoroughly with water then rake salt through the sand at intervals during the day and leave exposed to the sun.
  • Change sand completely if it is contaminated extensively.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Early Years Learning Framework
National Quality Standard
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 (VIC)

Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 (VIC)

National Health and Medical Research Council: Preventing Infectious Diseases in Childcare 2005
Health and Safety in Family Day Care 2003 UNSW

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Sleep, Rest, Relaxation and Clothing Policy

NQS

QA2

2.1.2

Each child’s comfort is provided for and there are appropriate opportunities to each child’s need for sleep, rest and relaxation.

National Regulations

Reg

81

Sleep and Rest


EYLF

LO3

Children recognise and communicate their bodily needs (for example, thirst, hunger, rest, comfort, physical activity).

Educators engage children in experiences, conversations and routines that promote healthy lifestyles and good nutrition.

Educators consider the pace of the day within the context of the community.

Educators provide a range of active and restful experiences throughout the day and support children to make appropriate decisions regarding participation.


Aim
This policy is based on recommendations from SIDS & Kids. If a family’s beliefs and practices conflict with SIDS & Kids, the service will only endorse an alternative practice unless the service is provided with written advice from and the contact details of a registered medical practitioner. In meeting the service’s duty of care, it is a requirement that all educators implement and adhere to this policy.
Our service believes in a short period of rest each day for every child to ensure their growth and development. We will aim to respect and cater for each child’s specific needs.

Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Death of a Child Policy
Medical Conditions Policy
Physical Environment Policy
Staffing Arrangement Policy


Implementation
The Approved Provider will ensure that the Nominated Supervisor (who is responsible for ensuring all staff members, educators and volunteers) must implement the following requirements –

  • The service will provide a quiet and restful environment for sleep and rest periods that is within hearing and observation range for educators to closely monitor children.
  • We recognise the differences between each child and family’s preferences in relation to routines for rest, sleep and clothing. These needs will be met provided they are within the service’s requirements.
  • We respect the need for rest, sleep and clothing requirements to be aligned with each child’s social and cultural background and personal preferences.
  • We will communicate daily with parents about their child’s routines that are in place at the service and at the child’s home.
  • Educators will work with children to help them learn about their need for rest and comfort. Children will be encouraged to communicate their needs where possible.
  • Educators negotiate the need for sleep and rest with children.
  • Children who do not require sleep or rest will be provided with appropriate and quiet play activities.
  • Children will be encouraged to make appropriate decisions about their participation throughout their time at the service.
  • Each child will be supplied with clean, appropriate spare clothes when necessary.
  • Children will be grouped in a way that minimises overcrowding.
  • The privacy needs of each child will be respected during dressing and undressing times.

Safe resting for babies (birth to 24 months)

  • Babies will be placed on their back to rest.
  • If a medical condition exists that prevents a child from being placed on their back, the alternative resting practice must be directed in writing by the child’s registered medical practitioner.
  • If older babies turn over during their sleep, allow them to find their own sleeping position, but always lay them on their back when first placing them to rest.
  • At no time will a baby’s face be covered with bed linen.
  • To prevent a baby from wriggling down under bed linen, they will be placed with their feet closest to the bottom end of the cot.
  • Quilts and duvets will not be used as bed linen. Pillows, soft toys, lamb’s wool and cot bumpers will not be used.
  • Light bedding is the preferred option, which must be tucked in to prevent the baby from pulling bed linen over their head.
  • Sleeping bags with a fitted neck and arm holes are an alternative option to bed linen and encourage a baby to rest on their back. Sleeping bags should not have a hood.
  • Calm relaxing music will be played.
  • Dummies will be provided but they will not be attached to chains.

Safe resting practices for toddlers (18month – 3 years).

  • Toddlers will be placed on their back to rest, unless otherwise directed in writing by the child’s medical practitioner.
  • If toddlers turn over during their sleep, allow them to find their own sleeping position, but always lay them on their back when first placing them to rest.
  • At no time will a toddler’s face be covered with bed linen.
  • If using a cot, toddlers will be placed with their feet closest to the bottom end of the cot to prevent them from wriggling down under bed linen.
  • Quilts and duvets will not be used to cover toddlers in a cot or on a mattress. Pillows, soft toys, lamb’s wool and cot bumpers will not be used.
  • Light bedding is the preferred option, which must be tucked in to prevent the toddler from pulling bed linen over their face.
  • Sleeping bags with a fitted neck and arm holes are an alternative option to bed linen and encourage a toddler to rest on their back. If parents request tocontinue using the sleeping bag option when the toddler rests on a mattress, then the service will comply.
  • Quiet experiences may be offered to those toddlers who do not fall asleep.
  • Calm relaxing music will be played.

Safe resting practices for preschool children (3-5yrs)

  • Preschool children will be placed on their back to rest. If they turn over during their sleep, allow them to find their own sleeping position but always ask them to lay on their back when first placing them to rest.
  • At no time will a preschooler’s face be covered with bed linen when they are sleeping.
  • Light bedding is the preferred option.
  • Quiet experiences may be offered to preschoolers who do not fall asleep.
  • Calm relaxing music will be played.

Supervision of resting children

  • All children who are resting will be supervised by educators ensuring ratios are upheld at all times.
  • All children who have fallen asleep in the service will be monitored regularly with specific attention to breathing patterns. All babies will be monitored every 10 minutes.


Settling children for rest
Carers will comfort children when required. We discourage rocking children to sleep as this will form an unworkable habit with families at home.
Beds, Cot and Sleeping Areas Checks
Every 4 weeks the service will conduct a safety check of the resting environments, equipment and/or aids by following the Bedding and Cot room Audit.
Cots
All cots meet Australian Standards for Cots and be labelled AS/NZS 2172:2010 or AS/NZS 2195:2010. Cot mattresses should be in good condition, clean, firm, flat and must fit the cot base with no more than a 25mm gap between the mattress and the sides of the cot.
Prams and strollers are not to be used for children to sleep or rest in.
Hygiene practices, please refer to cleaning schedules

  • Cots and mattresses protective covers are cleaned with soap and water are visibly soiled and as per cleaning schedule which is displayed in rooms.
  • Each child has their own bed linen.Children’s bed linen will be washed at the end of care during the week or at the end of week, whichever comes first.

Rest environment
Please refer to the Physical Environment Policy for information regarding the appropriate sleep and rest environment for children.
Sleepwear
Educators monitor the temperature of the rest environment and address children’s clothing needs.Children will not have hoods and cords from clothing as per our clothing policy.
Communicating with families
Rest strategies and practices are outlined in the Family Handbook, enrolment forms, newsletters, posters and brochures. Information regarding SIDS & Kids Safe Sleeping Practices will be displayed on noticeboards and given to all new enrolments.

Children’s Clothing

  • Children should be clothed in an appropriate manner which will allow them to explore and play freely and not restrict them using equipment while at play
  • Clothing should also allow easy access for toileting i.e. elasticised trousers, track pants – rather than buttons, zips, belts etc.
  • Children will be encouraged by educators to use aprons for messy play and art experiences to protect their clothing. For this reason it is important to not send the children in their best clothes.
  • Children should be appropriately protected from the sun during outdoor play - please refer to sun safety policy for further directives on hats and clothing.
  • Child clothing should accommodate weather conditions. I.e. be loose and cool in summer to prevent overheating and warm enough for cold weather – including outdoor play. At all times educators will monitor children to ensure they are appropriately dressed for all weather, play experiences, rest and sleep routines.
  • Children should have appropriate footwear that enables them to play comfortably and not cause safety concerns. I.e. thongs, clogs or backless shoes have a trip factor and do not allow children to use equipment safely.
  • Comfortable and non-restrictive clothing is important at sleep time to promote your child’s comfort at this time of the day.
  • Clean and appropriate spare clothing will be made available to children should it be needed.
  • All clothing and belongings must be clearly labelled with the child's name.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
Early Years Learning Framework
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 2001
Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). (2003). SIDS in Australia 1981-2000: A statistical overview. Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 2172:2010, Cots for household use—Safety requirements
Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 2195:2010, Folding cots—Safety requirements
SIDS & Kids. Wrapping babies.
SIDS & Kids. (2005a). Fast facts: Past, present & future.
SIDS & Kids. (2005b). SIDS & Kids: Safe sleeping in child care kit.
SIDS & Kids. (2005c). SIDS & Kids: Safe sleeping – Lullabies aren’t the only things you’ll need to know to put your baby to sleep.
SIDS & Kids. (2005e). Wrapping infants.
SIDS & Kids (2006a). Information statement: Baby’s head shape.
SIDS & Kids. (2006b). Sudden Unexpected Death in Infants (SUDI) frequently asked questions: SIDS & Kids: Safe sleeping in child care kit.
United Nations Conventions on the Rights of a Child


Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Social Networking Usage Policy

NQS

QA4

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

4.2.3

Interactions convey mutual respect, equity and recognition of each other’s strengths and skills

QA5

5.2.3

The dignity and the rights of every child are maintained at all times

QA6

6.1

Respectful supportive relationships are developed and maintained

QA7

7.1.1

Appropriate governance arrangements are in place to manage the service

National Regulations

Reg

181

Confidentiality of records kept by approved provider

181-184

Confidentiality and storage of records


Aim
To ensure that our service, children, educators or families are not compromised on any form of social networking or related website.

Related Policies
Educator and Management Policy
Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
Technology Usage Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Staff
Families
Management

Implementation
A social networking website can be defined as a website used to socialise or communicate. These include but are not limited to Facebook, MySpace and Twitter (including usage on any device such as the internet, mobile telephone or tablet).

  • Our stance on social networking websites is that they are for personal use only and should not be accessed while the staff member is at work.
  • Educators who can access a social networking site via their mobile phones are not to do so during their shifts at the service and are not to use their camera or video phones to take photos/pictures while at the service.
  • No information about what happens at the service should be posted on a social networking website, nor should any photos taken at the service or on an excursion, be put on a social networking website. If an educator does put photos of a child or children enrolled at the service on a social networking website, families will immediately be contacted. If possible, the social networking website will be contacted to delete the photos. The educator will face an inquiry into their actions and possibly face termination of employment.
  • Please be aware that social networking websites are not a private means of communication but can be accessed by the public, therefore, it is important not to share private information about service families or other educators on social networking websites. Should you do so, the staff member will face an inquiry into the situation by Nominated Supervisor and any involved party and depending on the severity of the situation face possible termination of employment.
  • Should harassment of any kind take place on a social networking site, such as, but not limited to, sexual or verbal harassment, educators will face an inquiry into their actions and depending on the severity of the situation face possible termination of employment.
  • Should a family member related to the service harass an educator via a social networking website, the Nominated Supervisor will conduct an inquiry into their actions and depending on the severity of the situation they may face possible termination of their child’s place at our service.
  • This policy also complies with state and national laws regarding social networking websites. Should a staff member break the law on a social networking website, such as, but not limited to, defamation, the service will contact the police and other relevant authorities.

Sources
National Quality Standard
Education and Care Services National Regulations


Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Staffing Arrangements Policy

NQS

QA4

4.1.1

Educator-to-child ratios and qualification requirements are maintained at all times.

QA7

7.1.1

Appropriate Governance arrangements are in place to manage the service.

National Regulations
Regulations numbered 240 and higher are state or transitional regulations

Reg

122

Educators must be working directly with children to be included in ratios

Reg

123

Educator to child ratios—centre-based services

Reg

126

Centre-based services—general educator qualifications

Reg

130

Requirement for early childhood teacher—centre-based services—fewer than 25 approved places

Reg

131

Requirement for early childhood teacher—centre-based services—25 or more approved places but fewer than 25 children

Reg

132

Requirement for early childhood teacher— centre-based services—25 to 59 children

Reg

133

Requirement for early childhood teacher—centre-based services—60 to 80 children

Reg

134

Requirement for early childhood teacher—centre-based services—more than 80 children

Reg

135

Early childhood teacher illness or absence

Reg

136

First aid qualifications

Reg

150

Staff record must include name of responsible person at service each time children being educated and cared for by the service.

Reg

173(2)(c)

Offence not to clearly display name of responsible person in the main entrance

Reg

240

Qualifications for educators—centre-based service applies until 31.12.15
Applies to reg 126

Reg
Reg

241
242

Persons taken to hold an approved early childhood teaching qualification
Persons taken to be early childhood teachers applies from 1.1.14 to 1.1.16
Applies to regs 130-134

Reg

243

Persons taken to hold an approved diploma level education and care qualification

Reg

244

Persons taken to hold an approved certificate III level education and care Qualification

Reg

245

Person taken to hold approved first aid qualification.
Applies until 31.12.12 or qualification expires.

Reg

246

Anaphylaxis training

Reg

247

Asthma management training

Reg

355

Educator to child ratio—children over preschool age
Applies to reg 123(1)(d)

Reg

356

Qualifications for educators—children over preschool age
Applies to reg 126(2)

Reg

357

Educator to child ratio—children aged over 24 months but less than 36 months
Applies to reg 123(1)(b)

Reg

358

Working with children check to be read

Reg

360

Educator to child ratios—children aged 36 months to preschool age
Applies to reg 123(1)(C)until 31.12.15

Reg

361

General qualifications—centre-based service
Applies to reg 126(1) until 31.12.15

Reg

362

Early childhood teacher in attendance—fewer than 60 children
Regs 130-132 do not apply until 1.1.14.

Reg

363

Early childhood teacher in attendance—60 or more children
Reg 133(1)(a) and (b)does not apply until 1.1.14
Reg 134(1)(a) and (b) does not apply until 1.1.20

Reg

364

Educational qualifications—centre-based services— saving of existing experience and qualification
Applies to reg 126(1)(b)


Aim
To ensure that our education and care service is at all times compliant in relation to staff/child ratios and qualified educators.
Related Policies
Excursion Policy
Transportation policy
Child Protection Policy
Continuity of Education and Care Policy
Educator and Management Policy
National Quality Framework Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Children
Families
Educators
Management

Implementation

Our service will maintain compliance to the following:

  • Our service will nominate a qualified and experienced educator, co-ordinator or other individual as the service’s Educational Leader. This person is responsible to lead the development and implementation of the service’s educational programs.
  • Our service will ensure that any educator that is under eighteen years of age does not work alone at the service and is supervised at all times by an educator who is over eighteen.
  • We will only include educators in the educators to child ratio who are working directly with the children.

Our service will maintain compliance to the following in relation to the everyday practicalities of service’s operations:

  • Educators rostering and routines will at all times make sure enough educators are available for the adequate supervision of children.
  • Supervising educators give their attention to the children and not to any other duties.
  • At no time will students or volunteers be included in the ratio of adults supervising children.
  • A nominated supervisor or certified supervisor will be on the premises at all times when children are being educated or cared for.
  • There will be more than one educator present when children are in attendance. No child will at any time be in the care of a sole educator.
  • Students and volunteers will never be left alone with a child or a group of children.
  • In any situation where adequate supervision of children is threatened, any educators on a meal-break must be prepared to return to duty to supply adequate supervision.
  • The Approved Provider or Nominated Supervisor will ensure that regulations in relation to the supervision of children are adhered to.
  • Educators supervising outdoors, should position themselves to see as much of the play area as possible.
  • One educator should be positioned close to the climbing frame as often as possible.
  • Any water activity should be closely supervised by one educator at all times.
  • Except for necessary discussions or concerns regarding children or matters relating to the Centre, educators will not congregate together outside.
  • When children are resting or sleeping they will be supervised.
  • During hand washing and/or toilet times children will be supervised in the bathroom area.
  • Toddlers and children undergoing toilet training will not be left unsupervised in the bathroom.
  • No child is to be left unattended at the table when eating.
  • Rosters will be designed and implemented to ensure that children receive continuity of care.
  • Our service will, when possible and to the best of our ability, make use of a regular pool of relief staff.

Supervision of Services
Our services must have at least one “responsible person” present at all times when caring for and educating children. A responsible person is:

  • an approved provider
  • a nominated supervisor
  • a certified supervisor who is in charge of the daily running of the service.

If more than one person at the Service is a “responsible person”, we will develop a roster to ensure at least one is present whenever children are present.
The name of the responsible person will be clearly displayed in the main entrance of the service.
Educator to Child Ratios
Our educator to child ratios will always meet the minimum requirements as stated below:

  • For children aged from birth to less than 36 months, 1 educator to 4 children.
  • For preschool aged children 36 months and over

Until 31 December 2015, 1 educator to 15 children
From 1 January 2016, 1 educator to 11 children.

  • If children being educated and cared for at the service are of mixed ages the minimum number of educators for the children must meet the requirements above at all times.
  • When an early childhood teacher (ECT) is required to be in attendance at the service as per the licensed places of our service, that teacher is counted as an educator at the service for the purposes of this regulation.
  • If the service is required to have access to an ECT for a period of time as per the licensed places, the ECT must be added to the minimum number of educators required for that service for that period.
  • If the service is a preschool program in a school in a class or classes where a full-time education program is also being delivered, educator ratio and qualification requirements do not apply.
  • At all times we will consider the needs of the children and provide adequate supervision.

Educator Qualifications
The qualification requirements for educators at a centre-based service educating and caring for children preschool age or under are as follows:
Until 31 December 2013:

  • At least 1 of every 3 educators required to meet the relevant educator to child ratio for a centre-based service for children ages less than 36 months must hold an approved diploma-level education and care qualification.
  • At least 1 of every 2 educators required to meet the relevant educator to child ratio for a centre-based service for children preschool age or under who are 36 months of age or over must hold at least an approved diploma-level education and care qualification.

From 1 January 2014:

  • At least 50% of the educators who are required to meet the relevant educator to child ratios for the service must have or be actively working towards at least an approved diploma level education and care qualification.
  • All other educators required to meet the relevant educator to child ratios for the service must have or be actively working towards at least an approved certificate III level education and care qualification.

Approved Diploma Qualification
A person is taken to hold an approved Diploma level education and care qualification if immediately before 1 January 2012:

  • Was recognised under the former education and care services law of any participating jurisdiction as a Diploma level educator or
  • Holds an approved qualification or former qualification as published on http://www.acecqa.gov.au/qualifications/

Approved Certificate III Qualification
A person is taken to hold an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification if immediately before 1 January 2012:

  • Was recognised under the former education and care services law of any participating jurisdiction as certificate III level educator or
  • Held an otherwise approved qualification or former as published on http://www.acecqa.gov.au/qualifications/ or
  • Before 1 January 2012 the educator completed a professional development course approved by the Secretary under the Children’s Services Regulations 2009 of Victoria and :
    • was employed full-time and continuously as an educator at a licensed children’s service or outside school hours care service for a period of at least 5 years immediately preceding 25 May 2009 or
    • was employed at least part-time and continuously as an educator at a licensed children’s service or outside school hours care service for a period of at least 10 years immediately preceding 25 May 2009.

Requirements for an Early Childhood Teacher (ECT)
By 1January 2014

  • For services licensed for fewer than 25 approved places:
    • The service must have an ECT working with the service for at least 20% of the time the service provides education and care.
    • In order to comply with this, the ECT may be working with the service by means of information communication technology.
    • This can be calculated on a quarterly basis.
    • For services licensed for 25 or more children but caring for fewer than 25 children, the service must meet the above during any period that it is educating fewer than 25 children. In line with this, any period that an ECT is in attendance at the service may be counted towards the 20% timing of the period of access for under 25 children.
  • For services licensed for fewer more than 25 but fewer than 59 children on any given day:
    • The service must have an ECT in attendance for at least 6 hours on that day if the service operates 50 or more hours a week or
    • If the service operates for under 50 hours per week for 60% of the time that the service is open on that day.
    • A service is not required to comply with this if the service employs a full time or full time equivalent ECT at the service.

  • For services licensed for fewer more than 60 but fewer than 80 children on any given day:
    • By 1January 2014, the service must have an ECT in attendance for at least 6 hours on that day if the service operates for 50 or more hours a week or
      • If the service operates for under 50 hours per week and ECT must be in attendance for 60% of the time that the service is open on that day.
    • By 1 January 2020, the service must have a second ECT for at least 3 hours on that day if the service operates for 50 hours or more a week or
      • If the service operates under 50 hours a week 30% of the time that the service is open on that day.
    • The service is not required to comply with this if the service employs a full-time or full-time equivalent ECT at the service and a second ECT for half of the full-time hours or half of the full-time equivalent hours.
  • For services licensed for more than 80 children on any given day:
    • By 1January 2014, the service must have an ECT in attendance for at least 6 hours on that day if the service operates 50 or more hours a week or
      • If the service operates for under 50 hours per week the service must have an ECT in attendance for 60% of the time that the service is open on that day.
    • By 1 January 2020, the service must have a second ECT in attendance for at least 6 hours on that day if the service operates 50 or more hours a week or
      • If the service operates for under 50 hours per week for 60% of the time that the service is open on that day.
    • The service is not required to comply with this if the service employs a full-time or full-time equivalent ECT at the service and a second ECT for full-time hours or full-time equivalent hours.

In the event of an ECT being sick or absent the service will meet the following requirements if the ECT is absent for periods under twelve weeks:

  • A person with an approved Diploma level education and care service qualification may be taken as an ECT.
  • A person who holds a qualification in primary teaching may be considered an ECT.

If the period is over 12 weeks, the service will engage another ECT.
Approved ECT qualifications:

  • an approved qualification that is published on http://www.acecqa.gov.au/qualifications/
  • The educator holds a qualification that is published in the list of former qualifications on http://www.acecqa.gov.au/qualifications/. The educator was recognised as an ECT under the former law of any participating jurisdiction, or for the purposes of a preschool funding program.
  • The educator was registered as an ECT in accordance with the requirements of another jurisdiction. This does not apply if the educator was working towards an ECT qualification.
  • If immediately before 1 January 2012, the educator was recognised as an ECT because they were enrolled in a course for a qualification that is published on http://www.acecqa.gov.au/qualifications/ in the list of former qualifications approved as early childhood teacher qualifications, the educator is taken to hold an approved ECT qualification when they complete the course.
  • If immediately before 1 January 2012, the recognition, registration, accreditation or qualification as an ECT as written above was subject to any restrictions imposed by or under an education law of a participating jurisdiction, the person is taken to be an ECT with the same restrictions.
  • The educator was registered as a teacher under the Teachers Registration and Standards Act 2004 of South Australian and was employed to deliver a preschool program.
  • In some cases, educators who were registered as teachers in other States or jurisdictions hold an approved qualification. These are listed in regulation 241 and on the national regulator’s website www.acecqa.gov.au/qualifications.
  • From 1 January 2014 to 1 January 2016, an educator who has completed at least 50% of a relevant qualification that would enable them to be qualified as an ECT and is actively working towards the completion of the qualification or holds an approved diploma level education and care qualification can be counted as an ECT.

Other Educators Qualifications:
First Aid Qualifications

  • The approved provider must ensure that at least one educator attending the service :
    • holds a current approved first aid qualification
    • has undertaken current approved anaphylaxis management training and
    • has undertaken current approved emergency asthma management training.
  • if immediately prior to the 1 of January 2012 a person held a first aid qualification or had completed first aid training that met the requirements under the former education and care services laws even if the qualification or training is not included in the list of approved qualification on the national regulator’s website. In this case the educator is taken to hold the approved first aid qualification until the earlier of 31 December 2012 or the date the training or qualification would have needed to be renewed under the former law.
  • If immediately prior to 1 January 2012 the education and care services law did not require that educators have anaphylaxis management training, the service will implement this by 1 January 2013.
  • If immediately prior to 1 January 2012 the education and care services law did not require educators to have asthma management training, the service will implement this by 1 January 2013.

Working With Children Check

  • The approved provider of an education and care service must read or ensure that the nominated supervisor or certified supervisor in day to day charge of the service has read a person’s working with children check before the person is engaged or registered as a family day care educator or works as a volunteer at the service. This doesn’t apply if:
    • A Working With Children Check cannot be issued due to the individual’s age and
    • The person cares or educates children at the service only under the immediate supervision of an educator who has attained the age of 18 years and holds or is actively working towards a diploma level education and care qualification or
    • A person who is registered as a teacher under the Victorian Education and Training Reform Act 2006 and the approved provider or nominated in day to day charge of the service has checked the relevant register to ensure the person is registered.
    • Further information is available at http://www.justice.vic.gov.au/workingwithchildren/home/about+the+check/

 

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Children’s Services Regulations 2009
Department of Justice Vic

 

Review

The policy will be reviewed annually.
Review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Technology Usage Policy

NQS

QA1

1.1.1

Curriculum decision making contributes to each child’s learning and development outcomes in relation to their identity, connection with community, wellbeing, confidence as learners and effectiveness as communicators.

QA4

4.2.1

Professional standards guide practice, interactions and relationships.

National Regulations

Reg

73

Educational programs

EYLF

LO5

Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking

Aim
The Service will provide an extension to the daily program assisting in development of social, physical, emotional, cognitive, language and creative potential of each child.

Related Policies
Enrolment Policy
Education, Curriculum and Learning Policy
Social Networking Usage Policy

Implementation
Computer and Related Technology Usage

  • Computers at the service may only be used for work relevant to the operations and activities of the service. Examples of these activities include administration, research, programming and professional development.
  • If relevant to the children’s learning, child appropriate websites may be accessed. However, children will only access the computers when directly supervised by appropriate educators.
  • Similarly, music, videos etc may be streamed from the computer if it is relevant to the children’s learning or relevant to research or professional development undertaken by educators. However, streaming of this kind will only take place from websites where this can legally take place such as iTunes or YouTube.
  • If an educator has brought in their own laptop to complete work, educators will follow the premise that what they are doing whilst on their laptop is relevant to their job roles at the service.
  • For those educators who can access the internet from their mobile phone, it is preferred that educators do not access the internet (whether they are using the service’s Wi-Fi or their personal data plans) via their mobile phones but rather use the service’s computers for work relating to their job role.
  • Any staff member found to be using the computers inappropriately will face an enquiry by management and other relevant parties to decide a course of action based on the severity of their misconduct.
  • This policy is also incorporative of state and federal laws regarding computer usage. Should a staff member or other relevant individual use the service’s computers in a way that breaks a law, the service will take the appropriate required action (eg. Reporting to the police). Furthermore, the staff member or individual will face an enquiry held by management and other relevant parties to assess whether this conduct will affect their role within the service’s operations.

Television and DVD Player Usage
The T.V will be an additional tool to enhance curriculum activities, not a substitution.
Guidelines for use would be:

  • To assist in expanding the content of the daily program and current affairs.
  • Be suitable to the needs and development levels of each child watching.
  • Chosen programs should hold the interests of the children
  • Long Day Care and free activity times can be assisted when inclement weather keeps children indoors.

Programs must be carefully selected with suitable content. Programs depicting violence e.g. graphic news reports should not be shown. Children are to view 'G' rated videos only.

Educators will sit with the children to monitor and discuss any aspects of the video or television program they are viewing.


Sources
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Parents
  • Interested Parties.

Tobacco, Drug and Alcohol Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations

Reg

82

Tobacco, drug and alcohol free environment


Aim
To ensure children are not subjected to the dangers associated with tobacco, drugs and alcohol, we will maintain a harm free environment where no individual staff member is affected by alcohol or drugs.

Related Policies
Health, Hygiene and Safe Food Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Implementation
Our service is strictly tobacco, drug and alcohol free.
In order to keep children, educators, families and visitors free from the dangers of drugs, alcohol, tobacco smoke and other smoke, including illegal substances, the following rules apply -
The consumption of tobacco, drugs and alcohol is prohibited in all areas of the service including -

  • Inside.
  • Outside in the playground.
  • Outside in the car-park.

Smoking and the consumption of alcohol is also prohibited -

  • On incursions or excursions at any point during the event.
  • While travelling with a child.
  • At educator meetings.
  • At parent meetings.
  • At any social activity, whether in work hours or not, where the children and staff are involved.

Under no circumstances will any individual attend the service if they are affected by alcohol or drugs, including prescription medication, if in any way the consumption of these items impairs an individual’s capacity to supervise, educate or care for children.
The service will have No Smoking signs displayed.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Early Years Learning Framework
Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Transportation Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.1

Children are adequately supervised at all times.

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

QA6

6.3.2

Continuity of learning and transitions for each child are supported by sharing relevant information and clarifying responsibilities.

National Regulations

Reg

100

Risk assessment must be conducted before excursion.

101

Conduct of risk assessment for excursion.

102

Authorisation for excursion.

99

Children leaving the education and care premises

 

Aim
The safety of each child and all educators is paramount at all times. This includes those children and accompanying educators who travel on the service’s bus. Proper restraint systems will be used according to current Australian Standards. The vehicle itself will be maintained according to Australian Standards.

Related Policies
Additional Needs Policy
Excursion Policy
Parental Interaction and Involvement in the Service Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy
Tobacco, Drug and Alcohol Policy
Physical Environment (Workplace Safety, Learning and Administration) Policy

Implementation
The guidelines in the Transportation Policy will be used to educate children, families and the community on safely transporting children, road and pedestrian safety.
Educators will assist motor vehicle drivers and bus drivers to ensure each child is transported safely at all times. The service understands that the driver maintains ultimate responsibility for road safety and ensuring each child is properly seated and restrained. All educators, however, have an equal responsibility to assist the driver and check that each child is seated and restrained appropriately using the following guidelines. Under no circumstances will any child be transported if all of the following guidelines are not met.

 

General Transport Guidelines

  • Smoking of any substance, the intake of alcohol or the use of any illegal substance by any individual while involved with the transportation of children is prohibited. Educators will refer to the service’s Tobacco, Drug and Alcohol Policy for further guidelines.
  • Children will never be left unattended in any vehicle to promote positive supervise and to prevent heat stress.
  • Educators will ensure that car seats, booster seats and seat belts are properly secured on each child and themselves before departing.
  • Educators will assist each child to fasten and release the safety restraints on their seats.
  • Children will only be transported in a vehicle in the manufacturer’s stated capacity is adhered to at all times.
  • Children will be prohibited from drinking, eating, standing and any other dangerous activities whilst in the vehicle.
  • Children will be accompanied at all times, including to and from the vehicle.
  • If possible, children who have special needs will have their needs accommodated for. An educator who is familiar with these needs will travel with the child.
  • Educator ratios apply as they do when travelling for an excursion.

 

Guidelines for Seatbelts and Restraints

  • Seatbelts and restraints must meet Australian Standards (AS/NZS1754) and be marked as complying with the Australian Standard.
  • Educators will ensure that each child under seven years of age must be secured in a child restraint or booster seat when travelling in a vehicle.
  • Babies up to six months of age must be restrained in a rearward facing restraint.
  • Children from six months to under four years of age must be restrained in a rearward facing or forward facing restraint.
  • Children under four years of age must not be in the front row of a vehicle with two or more rows.
  • From four years to under seven years of age a forward facing restraint or booster seat must be used.
  • Children from four to under seven years of age can only sit in the front row of a vehicle with two or more rows when all other seats are occupied by children of a lesser age in an approved child restraint.
  • The ages specified above are a guide for the safety of each child. If a child is too small for a restraint specified for their age, they should be kept in their current restraint for as long as necessary.
  • If a child is too large for a restraint specified for their age, they may move to the next level of restraint.
  • Child restraints purchased overseas do not comply with Australian Standards and they are not compatible with Australian vehicles.
  • More information will be accessed as necessary using the following information

Buses (more than 12 seats)

  • A driver of a bus, that is designed to seat over 12 adults (including the driver), is not required to ensure passengers, including those under 16 years of age are in a restraint.
  • It is recommended that where a restraint is available, it should be worn.

Small Buses (9 to 12 seats)
A driver of a small bus (between 9 to 12 seats including the driver) providing a public passenger service under the Passenger Transport Act 1990 must ensure that:

  • All passengers younger than 12 months are secured in a child restraint.
  • All passengers aged over 12 months and under 16 years:
    • occupy a seating position that is fitted with a suitable seatbelt, and
    • not occupy the same seating position as another passenger, and wear the seatbelt properly adjusted and fastened.
  • No passenger under 4 years old is in the front seat and a child 4 years or older but under 7 years may only sit in the front row if all of the other seats in the row or rows behind the front row are occupied by passengers who are also under 7 years old.
  • A driver of a small bus not providing a public passenger service under the Passenger Transport Act 1990 is required to fully comply with the child restraint laws and must ensure that all passengers under 7 years old are appropriately restrained in an approved child restraint or booster seat.

Medical Exemptions

  • Children are exempt from wearing a child restraint if they hold a medical certificate signed by a medical practitioner which certifies that the child should not, for medical reasons, be restrained while travelling in a motor vehicle.
  • Generally, if a child is unrestrained within a vehicle on medical grounds, they must travel in a rear seat. However, if the medical certificate signed by a medical practitioner certifies that the child should not, or cannot, for medical reasons, travel in a rear seat, then the child may sit in the front row.

Vehicles

  • Only insured, licensed and vehicles with a high level of maintenance will be used.
  • The vehicle will have a First Aid Kit inside it and emergency contact details for all children and educators in the vehicle.
  • A mobile phone will be available in case of emergencies.

Drivers

  • Drivers must be legally-licensed.
  • Learners or Provisional licence (P-Plate licence) holders will not be allowed to drive the bus
  • Drivers will meet staff qualifications and must be able to pass a criminal history check.
  • Drivers will hold first aid certificates.
  • Drivers will drive legally and follow road rules at all times.
  • Drivers will not be included in the educator ratios.
  • Drivers will not be talking on a mobile phone at any time, including hands free systems, and loud music will not be played to prevent distractions.
  • The Nominated Supervisor is responsible for collecting background check and driving histories of the bus drivers and updating this information annually.
  • The Nominated Supervisor is responsible for ensuring the safety of the vehicle, insuring the vehicle and keeping it at a safe standard.

Excursions

  • The service will follow the Excursions Policy at all times.

 


Road Safety
Pedestrian Safety
Based on KidSafe Australia’s guidelines, our service recognises and will follow the following information –

  • Children are vulnerable road users.

Although children may think they can handle crossing a road by themselves, remember that children:

  • are easily distracted and focus on only one aspect of what is happening
  • are smaller and harder for drivers to see
  • are less predictable than other pedestrians
  • cannot accurately judge the speed and distance of moving vehicles
  • cannot accurately predict the direction sounds are coming from
  • are unable to cope with sudden changes in traffic conditions
  • do not understand abstract ideas - such as road safety
  • are unable to identify safe places to cross the road
  • tend to act inconsistently in and around traffic

Children need to be accompanied and closely supervised by a parent or adult carer to keep them safer.
A simple way of doing this is to hold hands.

Educators will use the following to guide education with families and the community –

  • Parents and caregivers have a key role in educating their children about road safety. Children learn about road safety largely by experience.
  • Parents and adult carers have opportunities in day-to-day routines to discuss road safety with children on the way to the newsagent, local shop or going to school.
  • Whenever crossing roads, it is an idea to talk about when and why it is safe to cross the road with your children so they can gain understanding about the broad range of factors involved.
  • Anywhere where there is a potential for moving vehicles is a potentially dangerous traffic situation for children. This includes residential areas, car-parks, at traffic lights, along footpaths, zebra and other crossings, driveways, quiet streets, and busy streets.
  • Children need parental/adult carer close supervision in and around traffic to make them safer.

 

Drive Way Safety

  • ALWAYS SUPERVISE your children whenever a vehicle is to be moved - hold their hands or hold them close to keep them safe.
  • If you’re the only adult around and need to move a vehicle, even just a small distance, PUT CHILDREN SECURELY IN THE VEHICLE WITH YOU while you move it.
  • ENCOURAGE CHILDREN TO PLAY IN SAFER AREAS AWAY FROM THE DRIVEWAY & CARS - the driveway is like a small road and should not be used as a play area.
  • MAKE CHILD ACCESS TO THE DRIVEWAY DIFFICULT – for example use security doors, fencing or gates.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Passenger Transport Act 1990
Road Rules 2008
Roads and Maritime Service, Safer Child Restraints: your guide to buying a child restraint
KidSafe NSW
Road Safety Act 1986
Road Safety Road Rules 2009
Road Safety (Vehicles) Regulations 2009
Road Safety (Drivers) Regulations 2009
Road Safety (General) Regulations 2009
Road Safety (Traffic Management) Regulations 2009

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

Unenrolled Children Policy

Aim
To ensure that educators and the service are only responsible for children who are enrolled at our service to meet our legal requirements and child/educator ratios.

Related Policies
Child Protection Policy
Enrolment Policy
Excursion Policy
Family Law and Access Policy
Orientation for Children Policy
Relationships with Children Policy
Staffing Arrangements Policy

Who is affected by this policy?
Child
Educators
Families
Management

Implementation

  • On occasion, children who are not enrolled at our service may be present at the service.
  • An example of this is when families come to pick up an enrolled child and they bring their other children with them.
  • At times like this, the children who are not enrolled at the service are the responsibility of the adult that brought them to the service.
  • We ask these adults to keep unenrolled children off any equipment at the service, and for the child to be accompanied by the adult at all times.
  • Should a child who is not enrolled at the service attend an excursion with the service, they may only attend should the child to educator ratio not be compromised for enrolled children.
  • Any child that is enrolled at the service on a temporary basis will be included in the educator/child ratios.

Sources
Education and Care Services National Regulations
National Quality Standard

Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:
Management
Employees
Families
Interested Parties

Work Health and Safety Policy

NQS

QA2

2.3.2

Every reasonable precaution is taken to protect children from harm and any hazard likely to cause injury.

National Regulations

Regs

168

Policies and procedures are required in relation to health and safety

Aim
We aim to do everything possible to protect the health, safety and welfare of all educators and other people who may be affected by our operation including our children and their families.
Implementation
Duty of Care

The Approved Provider and Nominated Supervisor will ensure he or she takes all reasonable steps to ensure the health and safety of all educators, staff, volunteers, children, their families and any other people impacted by the service operations. This includes identifying and eliminating or reducing all reasonably foreseeable hazards and providing appropriate training and instruction. Our educators, staff and volunteers will also ensure they take reasonable care for their own health and safety and that their conduct does not adversely affect the health and safety of other people.

Consultation, Cooperation and Coordination

Our service will share information about health and safety matters with educators, staff, and volunteers and encourage them to express their views or raise issues. We will involve our Health and Safety Representative in the consultations (if applicable).

Our service will consult with educators, staff, and volunteers when:

  • identifying hazards and assessing risks arising from work
  • proposing changes that may affect the health and safety of workers
  • carrying out activities prescribed by the Work Health and Safety Regulation.

Our service will also consult with educators, staff, and volunteers when making decisions about:

  • ways to eliminate or minimise risks
  • the adequacy of their facilities
  • consultation procedures
  • resolving health and safety issues
  • monitoring their health and safety or the safety of workplace conditions
  • how to provide health and safety information and training.

Consultation with our educators, staff, volunteers and health and safety representatives (if applicable see below) means:

  • relevant work health and safety information is shared
  • they have a reasonable chance to express their views
  • they are given a reasonable opportunity to contribute to the decision making process
  • their views are taken into account
  • they are advised of the outcome of the consultation in a timely manner.

Our educators, staff, and volunteers are entitled to:

  • elect a health and safety representative
  • request the formation of a health and safety committee
  • cease unsafe work
  • have health and safety issues resolved in accordance with an agreed issue resolution procedure
  • not be discriminated against for raising health and safety issues.

Health and safety representatives

Our educators and staff can elect Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs). If a request is made for a HSR, our Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor will:

  • commence negotiations with workers about the number of HSRs and any deputy HSRs, and which workers will be represented by the HSRs (in groups called work groups) within 14 days. Workers from multiple services can be part of the same work group.
  • give all educators and staff the chance to nominate as a HSR and to vote in an election if there is more than 1 candidate.
  • notify workers of the outcome of the negotiations as soon as possible.

The Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor must keep a current list of all HSRs and deputy HSRs and display a copy at the workplace. The list must also be given to Workplace Health and Safety Queensland.

A HSR can:

  • inspect the workplace of their work group
  • accompany a workplace health and safety inspector during an inspection
  • be present at an interview with a worker that the HSR represents (with their consent) and the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor or an inspector about health and safety issues
  • request a health and safety committee be established
  • monitor compliance measures by the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor
  • represent the work group in health and safety matters
  • investigate complaints from members of the work group
  • inquire into any risk to the health or safety of workers in the work group
  • request the assistance of any person, including a union, whenever necessary.
  • issue Provisional Improvement Notices in the form and manner prescribed in the legislation (these Notices must be adhered to and displayed)
  • direct workers to cease unsafe work where the HSR considers there is a serious health and safety risk if consultations the Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor do not resolve the issue.

Our service will ensure HSRs and deputy HSRs:

  • are never prevented from carrying out any of their duties
  • are able to give people assisting them access to the workplace
  • can take paid leave to attend to their health and safety duties
  • can take paid leave to attend an initial work health and safety course or annual refresher training approved by the regulator within 3 months of their request to attend. We will pay the course costs and reasonable expenses
  • can access any resources, facilities and assistance that they reasonable require to undertake their duties.

HSRs or Deputy HSRs are elected for 3 years unless they leave the work group, are disqualified, resign or the majority of workers they represent agree they should not represent them. They
are not personally liable for anything done, or not done, in good faith while carrying out their role.

Health and Safety Committees

A Health and Safety Committee (HSC) can facilitate cooperation between the Approved Provider and educators, staff and volunteers in developing and implementing measures to ensure health and safety at our service.

At least 5 of our educators, staff, and volunteers, or our HSR, can request the establishment of a HSC. We will establish a HSC within 2 months of a request. We can also establish a HSC without a request. At least half the members of a HSC won’t have been nominated by the Approved Provider /Nominated Supervisor. A HSR can consent to be a member of the committee.

Our service will ensure:

  • a HSC has access to any information related to workplace hazards and the health and safety of workers, except for personal or medical information which would identify individual workers.
  • a HSC meets at least once every three months or at any reasonable time at the request of at least half of the committee members
  • HSC members are able to take paid leave to comply with their health and safety duties.

 

Notification of Death, Serious Injury or Illness
The Approved Provider/Nominated Supervisor must notify Workplace Health and Safety Queensland as soon as they become aware of a death, or a serious injury or illness that results in:

  • immediate treatment as an in-patient in a hospital, or
  • immediate treatment for:
    • the amputation of any part of the body
    • a serious head injury
    • a serious eye injury
    • a serious burn
    • the separation of skin from an underlying tissue (such as degloving or scalping)
    • a spinal injury
    • the loss of a bodily function
    • serious lacerations or
  • medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance.

A serious illness is:

  • any infection to which the carrying out of work is a significant contributing factor, including any infection that is reliably attributable to carrying out work:
    • with micro-organisms
    • that involves providing treatment to a person
    • that involves contact with human blood or body substances, or
    • involves handling or contact with animals, animal hides, skins, wool or hair, animal carcasses or animal waste products.

A dangerous incident is also notifiable under the legislation. Dangerous incidents include:

  • an uncontrolled escape, spillage or leakage of a substance
  • an uncontrolled implosion, explosion or fire
  • an uncontrolled escape of gas or steam
  • an uncontrolled escape of a pressurised substance
  • electric shock
  • the fall or release from a height of any plant, substance or thing
  • the collapse, overturning, failure or malfunction of, or damage to, any plant that is required to be authorised for use in accordance with the regulations
  • the collapse or partial collapse of a structure
  • the collapse or failure of an excavation or of any shoring supporting an excavation
  • the inrush of water, mud or gas in workings, in an underground excavation or tunnel

The approved provider or nominated supervisor must notify the regulator by telephone or in writing (including by facsimile or email) as soon as possible after the injury, illness or incident. If notified by telephone, the regulator may require a written notice of the incident within 48 hours. Records of the incident must be kept for at least 5 years from the date that the incident is notified. The approved provider/nominated supervisor must ensure the site where the incident occurred is left undisturbed as much as possible until an inspector arrives or as directed by the regulator.

 

Source
Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011
National Quality Standard
Work Health and Safety Act 2011
Work Health and Safety Regulation 2011



Review
The policy will be reviewed annually.
The review will be conducted by:

  • Management
  • Employees
  • Families
  • Interested Parties

PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION PROGRAM

At Somerville Childcare & Kindergarten we aim to provide the highest quality care & education for every child. We believe that every child has the right to feel safe and secure in a warm & nurturing environment that respects and caters for each child and family’s individual needs regardless of gender, age, ability, economic status, family structure, lifestyle, religion, culture or language.

The development of our curriculum reflects the beliefs that: -

  • Every child is different but created equal
  • Family values, community, beliefs and culture are important
  • The curriculum should be child & community focused
  • Play is the most important media through which children become active & involved learners
  • That educators must actively share the children’s experiences with them through meaningful interactions
  • Children should be free to explore the environment & have fun
  • Families & educators work collaboratively together to form a solid link between home & care
  • Educators are active role models for the children
  • We respect each child, helping them to learn through their own sense of self-worth and self-esteem

Our educators will;

  • Comfort and nurture your child by creating a feeling of acceptance & sense of belonging within the environment
  • Recognize that children have individual needs
  • Provide each child with opportunities to assist in exploring & creating their own environment by making their own choices & encouraging children to be creative & spontaneous
  • Keep records of each child’s learning through the daily curriculum, individual & group learning stories, child analysis, strength trees & achievement charts
  • Provide stimulating and challenging experiences to encourage confidence in exploring their environment including a variety of mediums and materials, both natural and recyclable
  • Provide opportunities and support for children to develop independence and skills in self-help during meal, toileting and rest procedures
  • Provide an educational curriculum that supports both indoor & outdoor play experiences which encourage play within different sized groups large, small & solitary
  • Ensure the curriculum reflects the children’s interests of the group & individual interests
  • Ensure your child has a quiet place to go to relax & rest whenever they choose
  • Use redirection & the use positive reinforcement to guide behaviour
  • Encourage the children to care for the environment & engage in sustainable practices throughout their day
  • Will value each child’s individuality & unique capabilities & interests which allow them to develop to their full potential